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Tie knots - Page 2

post #16 of 28
The half-windsor is my usual knot of choice, as I can always get a knot that is tight, well-formed, and secure.  Occasionally, just to upset my routine, I will use a Pratt knot/Shelby knot, which I find to be an attractive alternative.
post #17 of 28
I'll put my vote down for the Windsor, even if I don't use it all that often for the reasons stated by others. Incidentally, many of the "how to tie..." websites give conflicting instructions on the 'standard' knots. Fortunately for us all, the Cambridge physicists who wrote that "85 ways to tie a tie" book first wrote several technical articles on the topic.  These erudite monographs are at once an important leap forward in men's fashion and an object lesson in how to emphatically run a trivial topic into the ground.   I will now sheepishly admit to having the salient table from their Physica A paper taped to the inside of my closet.  It concisely lists all the "moves" (coded in vector shorthand) for tying the four well-known knots, as well as 6 or 7 unnamed others that are "aesthetic" in their view.  My wife thinks I'm a bit insane, and maybe I am...but at least I never get stuck trying to remember how to tie a Windsor knot.   Oh, yeah, I'm new, by the way.  Hi, and all. Adam C.
post #18 of 28
Welcome. This must be the oldest topic ever revived.
post #19 of 28
I was one of the two "other" votes. I'm a fan of the Shelby, if only because so few people use it and I just like being unique.
post #20 of 28
I'll also throw a vote in for the Pratt-Shelby, which for years has been about the only knot I used. I've recently started using the four-in-hand a fair amount, too. The Shelby is a very versatile knot.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
I'll put my vote down for the Windsor, even if I don't use it all that often for the reasons stated by others. Incidentally, many of the "how to tie..." websites give conflicting instructions on the 'standard' knots. Fortunately for us all, the Cambridge physicists who wrote that "85 ways to tie a tie" book first wrote several technical articles on the topic.  These erudite monographs are at once an important leap forward in men's fashion and an object lesson in how to emphatically run a trivial topic into the ground.   I will now sheepishly admit to having the salient table from their Physica A paper taped to the inside of my closet.  It concisely lists all the "moves" (coded in vector shorthand) for tying the four well-known knots, as well as 6 or 7 unnamed others that are "aesthetic" in their view.  My wife thinks I'm a bit insane, and maybe I am...but at least I never get stuck trying to remember how to tie a Windsor knot.   Oh, yeah, I'm new, by the way.  Hi, and all. Adam C.
What an incredible post.  I haven't a clue about what it (The "Physica A Paper") is all about, but I certainly enjoyed it.  
post #22 of 28
Navystyles- tying a bow tie confused the heck out of me too, until someone gave me the simpliest of all tips: tying a bowtie is the EXACT same thing as tying your shoelaces, only around your neck.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
I will now sheepishly admit to having the salient table from their Physica A paper taped to the inside of my closet.  It concisely lists all the "moves" (coded in vector shorthand) for tying the four well-known knots, as well as 6 or 7 unnamed others that are "aesthetic" in their view.
Great, great paper about tie knots: I got it printed. This is not a crank by the way: it actually appeared in "Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications" in February 2000. I wonder if the Editors of the Journal of Computational Physics would accept a paper I am planning to write, entitled "A New Numerical Method to Determine the Fitting Error on a Man's Suit". bern
post #24 of 28
I've stuck with a knot I came up with myself years ago after a bit of experimenting; it's probably got a name, but yet to come across it anywhere. I guess it's pretty similar conceptually to the Shelby: referring to the steps in the picture guide for the Shelby from the website... 1. Same, but with the thin end flipped over so that the stitching is facing inward. (Probably doesn't do anything special.) 2. Same. 3. Same. 3 1/2. Repeat steps 2 and 3, but this time bring the wide end up and over the other side (i.e. your left). The reason for doing this is to give the other side of the triangle more body so the resulting knot comes out more symmetrical. 4, 5, 6. EXACTLY the same, i.e. you form the loop by swinging the wide end from your RIGHT side to your left, pull through the top and tuck through. And that's it. Gives a medium-sized and pretty symmetrical knot which I think goes well with both normal and button-down collars. If you like a bigger knot, you can just repeat steps 2, 3, and 3 1/2, alternating sides and building up the triangle as you go along, before looping the knot and tucking. I don't like big knots though, which is why I've never liked the Windsor. I've also never liked the four-in-hand, because: a) I've never been able to get the knot even remotely symmetrical; and b) I'm pretty short so after getting the right length with the wide end, I end up with the thin end far too long.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
This must be the oldest topic ever revived.
I had forgotten all about it when I saw it revived, haha.  I was about to post on my favorite, when I saw someone replied to a post I had made back when the topic was originally posted.    Well, just for an update, I still have yet to learn the ways of the bowtie, haha.  Phil, I'll have to give it another shot with your advice in mind. I've been using the Half-Windsor a lot, lately.  But I still stick with the Four in Hand for the most part.
post #26 of 28
It depends on the circumference of your melon to some degree. A full Windsor with a smaller head gives the pinhead effect while a thin 4-in-hand with a Neil Cavuto-esque cranium might make you look like a pumpkin-head. Hint - when you untie your tie reverse the tying procedure rather than yanking the loose end through and your tie will last longer. Also, don't leave them tied after wearing (LAZY.) but untie them, hang loosely and let them regain the proper shape. NEVER iron your ties, use steam only or if you must press it put a cloth between tie and iron and use steam and light pressure to get out kinks - then hang it loosely. WARNING: heat/moisture will cause some cheaply made ties to turn into garbage....
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Hint - when you untie your tie reverse the tying procedure rather than yanking the loose end through and your tie will last longer.
Very good advice. Thanks for the tip, Carlo.
post #28 of 28
4 in hand Windsor is "à faux pas."
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