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Opening a law office - Page 4

post #46 of 82
As an added bonus, I recommend you immediately start preying on the countless interns who want to practice law or want to learn about what it means to be a lawyer and all that....
post #47 of 82
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know of a service where I could get a legal assistant for about 10 hours a week or so? It's not enough work that I can afford to hire someone full time or even part time. I thought about going the law student slave route but I would rather have someone with some training and I don't want to have to work around a school schedule.
post #48 of 82
Thread Starter 
I wouldn't even need them to come into my office most of the time. I do most of my work from home anyway so it could pretty much all be done telecommuting.
post #49 of 82
There are a lot of services that offer temporary legal staffing on a limited basis. Just google temporary legal staffing and you'll find plenty in your area.

Be aware though that you'll pay more per hour for a limited employee than you would for a full or even part-time regular employee.
post #50 of 82
I'm about to graduate from law school, and this is a potential option for me as well. So I took a solo practice course some alumni were offering at our school. They have extremely successful practices, so I thought I'd pass along some of their advice.

One thing that gets repeated over and over is to create systems for doing your work. Break things down into component parts and create a process for fulfilling it. For example, if you do get a receptionist or secretary, what do you want them to tell clients walking in the door? Also, how are you going to allocate the resources you do have to maximize the time you can spend providing a service to the client. It sounds like micromanagement, but it's really a matter of delegation and how to get it done. Someone said it earlier, but think like a businessman, not a lawyer.

Also, don't just see your salary as a function of whatever is left in the account after paying overhead. Think about what you'd like to make, within reason, and make it part of overhead. This isn't a guaranteed paycheck, but it will help you to understand exactly how much work you really need to bring in to get your practice where you want it.

There is a lot of great advice on here, especially from those already slugging it out. So, if what I've said conflicts with them, chances are good they are right(er) than I am.

Another book I could recommend is The E-myth Attorney. Very short and to the point. I've also heard great things about the Jay Foonberg book.

Good luck!
post #51 of 82
People per Hour is a great outsourcing website. Gets a huge amount done without my thinking about it.
post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post

Does anyone know of a service where I could get a legal assistant for about 10 hours a week or so? It's not enough work that I can afford to hire someone full time or even part time. I thought about going the law student slave route but I would rather have someone with some training and I don't want to have to work around a school schedule.

You are the kind of person I'll be interning for during summers...? *shudder*

Congrats that your practice is taking off. Hope to be in your shoes in 4 years.
post #53 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

You are the kind of person I'll be interning for during summers...?
If you're lucky tounge.gif
post #54 of 82
I've been running my own practice for about 3 years now after working for a big firm. I'm still not making what I made at the big firm, but I'm getting there. If I could give you one piece of advice, it's this: forget about the books on how to run a law firm and all that; instead, get some books on how to effectively network. The hardest part of running a law firm (at any level really) is developing business and the best way to develop business is to network effectively. I recommend books like "Never Eat Alone" by Keith Ferrazzi. Learn how to master the art of business development, and all of the rest of that stuff will just fall in place. And, if you don't have any business, then it doesn't matter if you know how to delegate to your secretary or not.
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by VaderDave View Post

Talk to a graphic designer and have him or her choose a couple of signature fonts for you to use on all your documents, so that you start to develop a recognizable style (but keep it simple).

Would you recommend a custom one of a kind font or do you just suggest getting a professionals help in finding a nice one pre-designed one?
post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Would you recommend a custom one of a kind font or do you just suggest getting a professionals help in finding a nice one pre-designed one?

I dunno. I would think that any of a number of existing fonts would be fine. I don't actually know anyone who designs fonts, so it never occurred to me to do that.
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattR View Post

Another book I could recommend is The E-myth Attorney. Very short and to the point. I've also heard great things about the Jay Foonberg book.
Good luck!

I'll have to check out the E-myth book. A financial planner I know told me that he had read the non-attorney version and that it changed his whole practice.
post #58 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by VaderDave View Post

I'll have to check out the E-myth book. A financial planner I know told me that he had read the non-attorney version and that it changed his whole practice.

That is almost word for word what my profs said about how it affected the way they run their practice.
post #59 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattR View Post

That is almost word for word what my profs said about how it affected the way they run their practice.

I downloaded it last night and read about half of it. I'll probably finish it today. It's very thought-provoking, at just the right time. The end of the year is when I review how things have gone and set goals/direction for the next year. This year my changes may be a little more drastic than in years past.
post #60 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by VaderDave View Post

I downloaded it last night and read about half of it. I'll probably finish it today. It's very thought-provoking, at just the right time. The end of the year is when I review how things have gone and set goals/direction for the next year. This year my changes may be a little more drastic than in years past.

hope it goes well! glad to hear it at least gave you some pause.
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