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Br suede jacket

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi, this is my first post so I will introduce myself. I'm 23, a business student in Canada, and I am currently working in Germany for the summer. I look forward to spending time on this forum, as there seems to be a lot of excellent style information, and the posters seem to be standup guys. As a student I typically shop at BR, Club Monaco, Mexx, and some items at the Gap. I'm also interested in the odd designer item by Boss, Polo, Lacoste, Ken Cole, DKNY, etc. (Nothing too high end) But I do have a pare of black Prada sport shoes that I picked up for sale here in Germany for about $140 American. (I couldn't resist) I'm also interested in some club clothing (like Diesel) for nights out. Overall I would say my style is "dressy casual", a typical outfit being: dark jeans, button down, shoes that are half dressy/half sneaker and a nice nylon jacket. I want to look stylish, but at the same time I don't want to look like I am trying too hard. Moving along.. I'm currently thinking about purchasing a Tan Suede Banana Republic Jacket. (you can find it on their website) What should I wear with this? I'm trying to coordinate shoes, belt, and bag. So far my instinct says that I should wear a matching belt and shoes, but I think the bag might be overkill. Any suggestions? Thanks, MonteCristo
post #2 of 10
Welcome to the forum. As for your question re. the Banana Republic Tan Suede jacket, my feeling is that you do not need to match all you assesories as much as make sure that any given outfit have a coherent feel. As I've written elsewhere, I actually think that too much exact matching looks overly fussy. I think that the rugged texture of suede and neutral color of the jacket work particularly well with denim. The jacket could be worn with bootcut jeans and desert boots (not necessarily suede) or sneakers. And you could try a thick tooled brown leather belt. You can wear a vintage tee, a fitted, untucked button down or a sweater with this combination, whatever fits you mood and the weather. Alternatively, the texture of corduroy goes well with those of suede and denim, and you could wear cords instead of jeans, or carry a corduroy messenger bag. Moleskin is another possibility.
post #3 of 10
Wo bist du denn in Deutschland? Ich kenne mich ziemlich gut in Berlin bzw. Koeln aus, falls du welche Tipps brauchst. OK back to Englisch. Germans aren't too fussy about coordination. Just look at the galling cloth interiors of some of their cars. I would say pair the jacket with jeans and leather (not suede) loafers. Match the belt and shoes. Bag should match neither. That said, you should be exploring some of the options available to you in Europe that most North Americans don't have, instead of ordering from Banana on the web. Step into an H&M for cheap und aktuell club looks or daily streetwear. For higher quality but still reasonable prices and quality that is Borrelli-like compared to Club Monaco's dross, try Zara. There should be one in any decent-sized town. (In Berlin, it's on the Tauenzienstr. maybe 150m after the Gap, walking from Bahnhof Zoo towards Wittenbergplatz/KaDeWe. If you're in Wien, there's one right on Stephansplatz, as well as one right about the U-Bahn station Neubaugasse.) A slightly more expensive (in the range of Hugo Boss, but considerably more interesting cuts and better fabrics) way to dress a cut above the other Jungs is to try Rene Lizard or Wolfgang Joop. Rene Lizard has standalone stores. Joop.'s only standalone store that I can recall is in Berlin's Tegel airport, but is available from many department stores, including Peek und Cloppenburg. Speaking of department stores, P-und-C is OK. C&A is inexpensive but sometimes has some interesting things. KaDeWe has lots of nice stuff but is pricey and has some surprising omissions (Polo but not RL Purple Label, for instance). Karstadt, Galleria Kaufhof, usw., they're pretty worthless. Peace, JG
post #4 of 10
Joe G and everyone else familiar with German department stores, Why is it that Peek und Cloppenburg stores (at least the few I've visited) are among the most boring, depressing retail spaces ever created. Apart from the appalling lack of good streetwear and the equally appalling abundance of ill-fitting, bulky, overly detailed leather jackets, which German men seem to like to wear with too short, too tight jeans and chunky footwear, it always amazed me that instead of grouping clothing by designers or looks, P und C stores seem to group everything by clothing item, such that if you are not swimming in a sea of wool overcoats, you are walking an entire aisle of indistinguishable trousers. I would expect this type of display at a discount store, but not at a high end department store. And their wares, which seem to range from middle to high end, are displayed as if they were the leftovers from a Robinson-May sale. It would seem that P und C could use the services of a first rate creative director like Simon Doonan. Ah, my rant for the day.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Joe G and everyone else familiar with German department stores, Why is it that Peek und Cloppenburg stores (at least the few I've visited) are among the most boring, depressing retail spaces ever created.  Apart from the appalling lack of good streetwear and the equally appalling abundance of ill-fitting, bulky, overly detailed leather jackets, which German men seem to like to wear with too short, too tight jeans and chunky footwear, it always amazed me that instead of grouping clothing by designers or looks, P und C stores seem to group everything by clothing item, such that if you are not swimming in a sea of wool overcoats, you are walking an entire aisle of indistinguishable trousers.  I would expect this type of display at a discount store, but not at a high end department store.  And their wares, which seem to range from middle to high end, are displayed as if they were the leftovers from a Robinson-May sale.  It would seem that P und C could use the services of a first rate creative director like Simon Doonan. Ah, my rant for the day.
P-u.-C is exceedingly boring in layout, but you've got to consider the market, which is basically the stolid teutonic upper middle class.... They do carry a shocking amount of indifferent stuff, a lot of it badged YSL (not Rive Gauche) or Burberry....not too different from an American Macy's or Parisian. From my experience, they do group things by item, but also have "stores within a store" for some designers. (In the one on Mariahilferstr. near the Museumsquartier in Vienna, they have "standalone" stores for Zegna Soft, Joop., Burberry London, Polo Ralph Lauren, and probably someone else. As for the lack of "streetware", both big department stores (P-u.-C on Mariahilferstr. and Steffl on Kaertnerstr.) both have basements for that purpose. Both of them mostly carry diffusion lines. I've bought all of my PS by Paul Smith shirts in the Vienna P-u.-C, for example. They also have JPG, & by D&G, Diesel, a smattering of Samsonite Blacklabel, that sort of thing. Peace, JG
post #6 of 10
Okay, Joe's comment about the presence of Polo and the absence of Purple Label in some higher end stores in Germany and Austria has gotten me on another rant. Why is it that in many European stores, American designers are represented by low-end Levi's and hackneyed brands like Gant and Marlboro, which get little or no play in better stores on this side of the pond? It seems that many Europeans are obsessed with a vision of Americana circa 1985. One would think that European buyers would be jumping to carry marquee designers like Calvin Klein and Donna Karan, discover newcomers like DSquared, and introduce *real* American style streetwear/denim by the likes of Pd&c and James Perse. Or, at very least, they could carry the better range of companies like Levi's. The Levi's Premium line has some terrific washes, for example. I mean, I really don't know too many people here who actually wear Marlboro, or Coca-Cola clothing, or MTV clothing, all of which feature prominently in Europe. I realize that many of the better, smaller, American designers and companies (Frankie B. and Andrew Dibben, for starters) just aren't equipped for large scale distribution, but surely this can't be the reason Donna Karan Signature isn't sitting next to Hugo Boss and Toni Gard, and Pd&c isn't kicking Armani Jeans out of business.
post #7 of 10
Okay, Joe's comment about the presence of Polo and the absence of Purple Label in some higher end stores in Germany and Austria has gotten me on another rant. Why is it that in many European stores, American designers are represented by low-end Levi's and hackneyed brands like Gant and Marlboro, which get little or no play in better stores on this side of the pond? It seems that many Europeans are obsessed with a vision of Americana circa 1985. One would think that European buyers would be jumping to carry marquee designers like Calvin Klein and Donna Karan, discover newcomers like DSquared, and introduce *real* American style streetwear/denim by the likes of Pd&c and James Perse. Or, at very least, they could carry the better range of companies like Levi's. The Levi's Premium line has some terrific washes, for example. I mean, I really don't know too many people here who actually wear Marlboro, or Coca-Cola clothing, or MTV clothing, all of which feature prominently in Europe. I realize that many of the better, smaller, American designers and companies (Frankie B. and Andrew Dibben, for starters) just aren't equipped for large scale distribution, but surely this can't be the reason Donna Karan Signature isn't sitting next to Hugo Boss and Toni Gard, and Pd&c isn't kicking Armani Jeans out of business.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
I realize that many of the better, smaller, American designers and companies (Frankie B. and Andrew Dibben, for starters) just aren't equipped for large scale distribution, but surely this can't be the reason Donna Karan Signature isn't sitting next to Hugo Boss and Toni Gard, and Pd&c isn't kicking Armani Jeans out of business.
Good point. American fashion over there (I say "over there" because I'm currently visiting my parents in Lagos) is pretty hackneyed. Timberland is surprisingly popular and well thought-of. The cigarette company Camel has had a line of clothing for some time that's sort of morphed into a European Eddie Bauer. (Eddie Bauer also has a few stores in Germany.) In a store in Vienna that's recently become hip among the student set (Blaumax, it's called) they actually had some OLD NAVY stuff. A few of America's big name collections are available, though. You just have to dig harder to find them. In Vienna, a store called Chenegi (sp?) carries a decent amount of DSquared (which I thought was Italian, but I'm probably wrong). A boutique that specialises in Franco-Japanese fashion (Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake, Comme des Garsons, that sort of thing; their only European line is Jil Sander) named emis also carries Calvin Klein's more exotic pieces. But has for why buyers aren't jumping onto new American stuff, I think there are two main reasons. First, a European fashioniste doesn't think that Americans can really compete with Europeans or Japanese in terms of design or quality. Those that are more open-minded are those who are likely to shop in NY where prices will be lower, anyway. (The costs incurred whilst travelling are not apt to be an issue.) And, in some cases, I think that their corporate parents (LVMH owns Donna Karan, for example, right?) don't want to cannibalise sales. Peace, JG
post #9 of 10
Joe G., FYI - DSquared is a labeled designed by two Canadian brothers - twins, if I remember correctly. It's not a label I actually know that much about, but if I remember the story correctly, the name comes from the fact that the first names of both brothers begin with D. I take your point that some European buyers might think that North Americans can't compete, but this explanation flies in the face of the popularity of Levis, for example. Many of my European friends believe that 501's are a miracle of design and quality, and they cost about twice as much as they do here; and Levis Engineered is popular in some European countries the way it never has been here. So I don't seen why Levi's Premium, for example, wouldn't be as popular. And IMO, the quality of Levi's Premium, as well as Paper Denim and Seven jeans blows those of companies like Diesel, Energie, Gas, or any of a plethora of popular European brands out of the water. It's just a shame that the GAP can garner such credibility while much better companies have no representation at all. Sorry, way off topic, I know.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Joe G., FYI - DSquared is a labeled designed by two Canadian brothers - twins, if I remember correctly.  It's not a label I actually know that much about, but if I remember the story correctly, the name comes from the fact that the first names of both brothers begin with D. I take your point that some European buyers might think that North Americans can't compete, but this explanation flies in the face of the popularity of Levis, for example.  Many of my European friends believe that 501's are a miracle of design and quality, and they cost about twice as much as they do here; and Levis Engineered is popular in some European countries the way it never has been here.  So I don't seen why Levi's Premium, for example, wouldn't be as popular. And IMO, the quality of Levi's Premium, as well as Paper Denim and Seven jeans blows those of companies like Diesel, Energie, Gas, or any of a plethora of popular European brands out of the water.  It's just a shame that the GAP can garner such credibility while much better companies have no representation at all. Sorry, way off topic, I know.
DSquared is Dan and Dean Caten, two Canadian brothers. However, they're based in Italy if I'm not mistaken. Their line is very Italian/Euro (to me, anyway) not North American/Canadian at all (compared to something like Kamkyl, which is based in Montreal.) As for the popularity of Levi's, Marlboro Classics, Camel, etc. I think with the bulk of the population, it's largely marketing along with the perception of across-the-water cachet. The same thing applies in North America - at Harry Rosen (an upscale business/casual type of clothing store) the only jeans they sell are from Boss, Zegna, and Armani. Don't even get me started on washes - it's all basic blue and black, nothing out of the ordinary, so you could sub in 501s and hardly know the difference.
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