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HOF: Labels, heels and nail patterns - Secrets to ID the maker - Page 7

post #91 of 2415
There is always a possibility that some of these manufacturers use the same label maker (I doubt they print their own labels) and end up with similar looking labels. I looked for a pic of a Corneliani label but couldn't find one. Here is a Corneliani for RLBL:



Here is a Zegna label:


Borrelli:


Samuelsohn:
post #92 of 2415
Isaia for Valentino Tailoring: Corneliani for RL Polo (again): Mysterious fully canvassed Italian suit from Burlington. Excellent Cerruti 1881 fabric and great cut. Does anyone recognize the tag? Really, really crappy suit for "Oliver" by another mysterious manufacturer. I have no idea who made this but I'm posting the tag in order to let you guys know to avoid the manufacturer. The decent Canonico fabric does not nearly make up for the suit's construction.
post #93 of 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by EL72 View Post
There is always a possibility that some of these manufacturers use the same label maker (I doubt they print their own labels) and end up with similar looking labels.

Definitely possible but I've never seen it happen before, their have never been more than slight resemblences. The current Canali and Corneliani labels on the other hand are extremely similar, almost exact.
post #94 of 2415
Vestimenta for Vestimenta?
post #95 of 2415
ralph lauren 2008 black label. can anyone confirm the maker? from the first page it seemed like it fits the zegna for dunhill pic, but searching this forum tells me that it's by caruso...???

post #96 of 2415
^^ Yes, it's made by Caruso.
post #97 of 2415
100% Sweet Caruso, the Sartoria de Parma level at that.
BAD ASS.
post #98 of 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Harris View Post
Definitely possible but I've never seen it happen before, their have never been more than slight resemblences. The current Canali and Corneliani labels on the other hand are extremely similar, almost exact.

They perhaps use the same piece of software to make the labels.
post #99 of 2415
who ordinarily makes Black label?
post #100 of 2415
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFusilliJerry View Post
who ordinarily makes Black label?

Caruso aka MaCo
post #101 of 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFusilliJerry View Post
who ordinarily makes Black label?

Caruso
post #102 of 2415
..
post #103 of 2415
Has anyone seen this tag before?

post #104 of 2415
1934 - 1936 In 1933, ACWA started to include a union label in all garments that were produced. The vintage tag shown to the left illustrates the union's sewing machine symbol and scissors in the center of a diamond with red numbering across the center of this tag. The left side of the tag will read " Union Made" on the first line and either "Work Clothes", "Suit", or "Garment" on the second line. The lower left corner of the tag underneath the "Workers of" will read copyright 1934 by ACW of A. 1936-1939 Tags identical to the 1934 tag have been found with copyright date of 1936. This tag was used from 1936 to 1939. Photo not currently Available 1939 - 1949 In 1939 a new tag was issued. The 1939 vintage label is identical to the 1934 issued tag. It has all the same features listed above except a new copyright date of 1939 followed by ACW of A. The right side of the tag will have the union bug mark followed by an number 80. 1949 - 1962 In 1949 the union label tag was redesigned. This vintage clothing tags of this type illustrate a sewing machine in the center, without scissors and a new layout for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America text. The red numbering will be on left of the tag and a "copyright 1949" will be on the right of the tag followed by a series code consisting of 3 letters. The lower left corner will not contain a circled R. 1962- 1976 In 1962 the circled R trademark symbol was added to the lower left corner of the tag. These tags will stil have the copyright date of 1949 on the right hand side. In later years, the numbering on the left was changed to black instead of red.
History of ACWA
The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America was formed in 1914 as a direct result of a bitter union strike in 1910 involving members of the AFL affiliated United Garment Workers (UGW), the AFL leadership, and their employer, Hart Schaffner and Marx. The strike expanded to city wide, 45,000 member garment workers strike in Chicago resulting in a division in the UGW membership. The union membership feeling that the union leadership did not reach a fair settlement on rejected the offer and continued striking. By 1914 the membership was ready for change and at the 1914 UGW convention 66 percent of the UGA membership defected to form Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America or ACWA. Shortly afterward, Sidney Hillman became president of the newly formed union and led it's membership for the first 30 years. As a result of this split, at its inception the AFL refused to recognize the ACWA as an AFL affiliate. Through a series of strikes in the late 1910's, ACWA continued to solidify its membership in garment industry and eventually established a stronghold in the key cities of Chicago, Baltimore, and Rochester, New York. By the 1920's, ACWA was the largest men's clothing union in the United States and was responsible for manufacturing a staggering 85% of men's garment. Like all unions of the time, the great depression thinned the ranks of ACWA's membership. ACWA survived the downturn and much of it's membership returned thanks to the union's legal right to organize gained from the National Recovery Act of 1933. As a result, despite the 19 years of opposition with the AFL, ACWA finally gained the AFL recognition as an affiliate in 1933. In 1935, while still leading the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and a member of the AFL, Sidney Hillman founded the Committee of Industrial Organizing (CIO) with the leaders of seven other AFL affiliate unions. At it's inception the CIO was not a rival of the AFL, but a part of the AFL that was focused on organizing labor in the mass production industries along industrial lines rather the by craft, skill, or trade. Other AFL leaders were opposed to organizing labor in this manner and in September, 1936 the eight founding unions including the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and two additional affiliates that joined the CIO were suspended from the AFL. In 1938 the CIO renamed itself the Congress of Industrial Organization and officially formed as a rival to the AFL. While other garment related unions such as ILGWU and the Millinery Workers returned to the AFL at this time, ACWA remained committed to the CIO until 1955 when the AFL and CIO finally merged back together forming the AFL-CIO. The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America continued to grow through the 1950's and remained a dominant union in the manufacturer of men' suit through the 1960's and early 1970's. In 1976 it ended 62 year of organizing labor under the name Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America when it merged with the Textile Workers of America and formed a new union known as the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU).
post #105 of 2415
Anderson & Sheppard hanger, circa 1950's:



Caraceni custom tag:

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