or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Ancient shoes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ancient shoes - Page 2

post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
Im sorry, those all look like shit.

Those shoes are certainly past their serviceable life. But how can a humble cobbler say no to a prince?
post #17 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
You would put on your freshly pressed bespoke suit, laundered shirts, crisp linen PS....and then these? And feel right about it? Seriously...


The suit is probably old too.
post #18 of 57
Yes, HRH wears everything to last...and beyond. I've seen photos of his shirt collars quite frayed many times over the years.
post #19 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
You would put on your freshly pressed bespoke suit, laundered shirts, crisp linen PS....and then these? And feel right about it? Seriously...
Without defending the appearance of it, the guy is 62 years old.
post #20 of 57
In the US, those kind of shoes are traditionally called "the Boston cracked shoe" look - one should be impeccably dressed, except for shoes that look like they're long past their useful life - it's obviously a not so subtle hint that although the wearer is wealthy, he admires well-worn traditional things and is frugal.

Here's a pair of Cleverlys that were in heavy rotation for 40 years - follow the link for a larger version of the picture (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-8R-QRniy7l...Cleverleys.jpg)
post #21 of 57
I love the look of those shoes. Most important is the fact that he wore them to that level, he didn't buy them secondhand. I hope all my shoes last me 40+ years.
post #22 of 57
The spit shine look has a practical purpose: it basically waterproofs the shoes. Military gents tend to bull the toecap - you see it a fair bit. Once you've got the shine it's easy to maintain, but it takes hours. Personally, I wouldn't do the whole shoe, but toecap - fine. No flexing there. Simple to do.

http://www.wikihow.com/Give-Your-Boo...y-Mirror-Shine
post #23 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
In the US, those kind of shoes are traditionally called "the Boston cracked shoe" look - one should be impeccably dressed, except for shoes that look like they're long past their useful life - it's obviously a not so subtle hint that although the wearer is wealthy, he admires well-worn traditional things and is frugal.

Here's a pair of Cleverlys that were in heavy rotation for 40 years - follow the link for a larger version of the picture (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-8R-QRniy7l...Cleverleys.jpg)

So Alan Flusser says in Style and the Man, but he also points out that it's a look and a set of values that have passed into mid-20th c. history. Personally, I love very old things, be it furniture, or well cared-for shoes. But you can only get away with this particular look in specific circumstances. Prince Charles can wear them, but a member of his staff never could.

However, I have noticed an interesting thing. I have an old Barbour jacket which I wore most days this past winter. It is showing its age, in terms of patina, shall we say, and has a few small holes here and there. People stop me and ask about it. One of them, a stranger, said that at the Barbour shop on Madison avenue they sell vintage ones just like mine for more than the price of a new one. So... maybe we are entering a new era where the appreciation of good things that are kept and worn to shreds will return. As for my oldest shoes... I'm not throwing them away.
post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
In the US, those kind of shoes are traditionally called "the Boston cracked shoe" look - one should be impeccably dressed, except for shoes that look like they're long past their useful life - it's obviously a not so subtle hint that although the wearer is wealthy, he admires well-worn traditional things and is frugal.

Now, see? You learn something everyday. Thanks, BBC - thats actually pretty interesting.
post #25 of 57
^ +1
post #26 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Also, HRH uses colored shoelaces? How come I never noticed that? I've seen pictures of those burgundy captoes a million times, but never noticed that.

you tell me, you don't have burgundy laces in your burgundy shoes? wtf
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
Now, see? You learn something everyday.

shouldn't this be the added value to the fun factor here? M.
post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
shouldn't this be the added value to the fun factor here? M.

I come to learn.
post #29 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
I come to learn.

post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by srivats View Post


Anyone notice how low those heels are?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Ancient shoes