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Ambrosi Napoli - Page 13

post #181 of 1785
I luv whnay
post #182 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big A View Post
I, like many before me, have come to realize that arguing with you is like playing "fetch" with a slightly retarded bulldog ... Just when you think you've gotten somewhere, it runs back into the wall.

I should have gone with the simplest form of the argument, which was: stop acting like a superior prick just because you've commissioned a bunch of bespoke garments from a foreign tailor.

You didn't have to say you thought you were better than NYR - it's rather evident in the "subtext" you keep referring to. One doesn't usually talk down to a person he considers an equal. Also, your "cool with that" statement smacked of classism - funny from someone who purports to never even have considered the subject (the horror! where's the divan, I might faint!)

I'm not saying you're necessarily a snob, although that's what the evidence suggests - you might just be an asshole.

Big words still bugging you? Figures. I knew kids like you in college. Spent too much time coping with not being Anglo-Protestant establishment to actually learn anything. The tragedy is mitigated by the fact those sorts tended to amongst the most loathsome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big A View Post
Finally, I wonder if you've had the opportunity to compare Ercole's work with Ambrosi's? If not, how is your opinion any more valid than NYR's?

Maybe it's never too late, so here's a lesson. I claimed that Ambrosi's trousers are exceptional in the amount of hand-sewing. This is backed by photographic evidence that very few seams are left to be done by hand. Moreover, in their completely hand-sewn model, literally all seams are hand-sewn. Thus, when compared to the latter, it is impossible for another trouser to have more handsewing. When compared to the former, it is exceedingly unlikely--given what we know about how much handwork is typical for bespoke trousers and the higher cost of labor in a place like Brooklyn versus Naples.

Simple analogy (let's see if you can follow): if you score perfect on a test, it's safe to say nobody has scored higher. If you score almost perfect, it is unlikely anyone has scored higher--estimably less likely when the person in question won't tell you his score.

So, yes, Ercole's, could be similarly hand-sewn, but there is no evidence of it and nobody has bothered to discuss it in detail. The only argument is "Wah, wah, who says my cheaper pants can't be as nice as yours!"

Get it? I tried to avoid using the word "parlance." If any of my other words aren't Asian enough for you, just let me know.
post #183 of 1785
I am actually wearing Ercole pants today. I can't say that I know how they compare WRT handwork. What's clear is that the Ambrosi handwork is much more visible or obvious. Ercole's more fades into the cloth and is harder to spot.

However, all visible stitches are by hand. Also, just like Ambrosi, he does a lap down the outer leg seam, also by hand. One difference is that Ambrosi hand tacks both the top and the bottom of belt loops whereas Ercole does them in the more British/American way of tucking the tops of the loops into the waistband.

Ambrosi pants have a unique configuration of buttons and fasteners. Ambrosi's have a little panel that attaches to two buttons on the inside plus two more buttons on the waistband. Ercole's are again more British/American: French fly with one button, hook closure, zipper.

The silhouette of Ecrole is different. More full, slightly higher rise, deeper pleats. These are "mid-Atlantic" in sihouette. Not as high as SR, not as low as a typical American RTW. Pleats in the English style. Ambrosi pleats are shallower and closer together.
post #184 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I am actually wearing Ercole pants today. I can't say that I know how they compare WRT handwork. What's clear is that the Ambrosi handwork is much more visible or obvious. Ercole's more fades into the cloth and is harder to spot.

However, all visible stitches are by hand. Also, just like Ambrosi, he does a lap down the outer leg seam, also by hand. One difference is that Ambrosi hand tacks both the top and the bottom of belt loops whereas Ercole does them in the more British/American way of tucking the tops of the loops into the waistband.

Ambrosi pants have a unique configuration of buttons and fasteners. Ambrosi's have a little panel that attaches to two buttons on the inside plus two more buttons on the waistband. Ercole's are again more British/American: French fly with one button, hook closure, zipper.

The silhouette of Ecrole is different. More full, slightly higher rise, deeper pleats. These are "mid-Atlantic" in sihouette. Not as high as SR, not as low as a typical American RTW. Pleats in the English style. Ambrosi pleats are shallower and closer together.

Inner leg seams?
post #185 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Inner leg seams?

Not on Ercole. I don't think my Ambrosis have that either but I would have to check.

Mina did not do a hand stitch on even the outer leg seam.
post #186 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Not on Ercole. I don't think my Ambrosis have that either but I would have to check.

Mina did not do a hand stitch on even the outer leg seam.

On the regular Ambrosi trousers, the inner seam is machine-stiched. On the "golden" trousers, they are done by hand. Additionally, all pockets are hand-stiched--I don't see why that would be a good thing, but it's more hand-stitching.
post #187 of 1785
I recall seeing Mina's having the pancerina as well, which I quite like.
post #188 of 1785
I am betting that on Ambrosis the actual leg seam is done by machine but a little overlap is left, which is then tacked down by hand. I don't think they actually sew the entire leg totally by hand. Could be wrong but I doubt it.
post #189 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I am betting that on Ambrosis the actual leg seam is done by machine but a little overlap is left, which is then tacked down by hand. I don't think they actually sew the entire leg totally by hand. Could be wrong but I doubt it.

Ah, true. I'll have to look.
post #190 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I am actually wearing Ercole pants today. I can't say that I know how they compare WRT handwork. What's clear is that the Ambrosi handwork is much more visible or obvious. Ercole's more fades into the cloth and is harder to spot.

However, all visible stitches are by hand. Also, just like Ambrosi, he does a lap down the outer leg seam, also by hand. One difference is that Ambrosi hand tacks both the top and the bottom of belt loops whereas Ercole does them in the more British/American way of tucking the tops of the loops into the waistband.

Ambrosi pants have a unique configuration of buttons and fasteners. Ambrosi's have a little panel that attaches to two buttons on the inside plus two more buttons on the waistband. Ercole's are again more British/American: French fly with one button, hook closure, zipper.

The silhouette of Ecrole is different. More full, slightly higher rise, deeper pleats. These are "mid-Atlantic" in sihouette. Not as high as SR, not as low as a typical American RTW. Pleats in the English style. Ambrosi pleats are shallower and closer together.

Thank you for the most informative post on this thread.
post #191 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post
Thank you for the most informative post on this thread.

+1
post #192 of 1785
I'd say it's a tie with post #178
post #193 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
If you score almost perfect, it is unlikely anyone has scored higher--estimably less likely when the person in question won't tell you his score.
This is a logical fallacy. If you scored almost perfect, that doesn't tell you anything about the likelihood of how everyone else has scored. It just means you almost scored perfectly. Every other person could have almost scored perfectly too. Hell, every other person could have scored higher. Standing alone, your score doesn't mean anything as a reflection of other scores. With the pants, there was an implication, whether you intended it or not, that Ambrosi's pants were better than others, because they score almost perfect. That just doesn't make sense. There could very well be other pants out there that score almost perfect too. The fact that Ambrosi's pants are almost perfect doesn't eliminate the possibility that other pants are almost perfect too. I actually need to order more pants. I think I'll stick with my current tailor for now.
post #194 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I'd say it's a tie with post #178

A tie indeed. Forgive the initial oversight. Still, neither has red lines or circles, the SF gold standard for infallible proofs and theorems.
post #195 of 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post
Nice.



Wait, you ride the pipe?!?! Pics or gtfo.

Not well but yes.
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