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Ambrosi Napoli - Page 12

post #166 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post
- - = +
A brilliant summation ... I'm not sure anything more can be said.
post #167 of 1859
Ambrosi + Jantzen Tailor ought to merge... and rename themsevles 'Scusi'
post #168 of 1859
So if I'm reading correctly, the Ambrosi magic is in the sewing/construction and not the fit?
post #169 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post
So if I'm reading correctly, the Ambrosi magic is in the sewing/construction and not the fit?

Both.
post #170 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post

Btw, how was Utah?

Sick, though the half pipe was super icy on one side.
post #171 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by sellahi22 View Post
The iron shaping is inherently temporary. The cloth returns to its original shape over time, and humidity/steam accelerates the process. The trousers then need to be carefully pressed to achieve the same effects as the original shaping. Jeffreyd has written extensively on this topic, so you should probably read up before posting further.

I know what you're speaking of, and naturally garments will mold to wear and your body over time. That said, I maintain that the general shape is upheld fine by anyone being somewhat capable of handling an iron.
post #172 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
No. I don't swim in the ethno-class-obssessed frame-of-mind that you can't find your way out of. In fact, I think it's laughable to infer anything about 'class' based on the fact someone lives in Brooklyn. You done caught your own tail. You must be a lunatic. You're the one who brought up my Asian-ness, insinuating that I'm somehow trying to rise 'above' it by using Italian tailors, yet remain nonethless 'just' an Asian. Truly disgusting sub-texts When the f*ck did I say I was better than him?!? His experience with tailors has nothing to do with the fallacy of his economic argument--it has everything to do with his claim that his tailor is every bit as good as those better-known and of higher repute.
I, like many before me, have come to realize that arguing with you is like playing "fetch" with a slightly retarded bulldog ... Just when you think you've gotten somewhere, it runs back into the wall. I should have gone with the simplest form of the argument, which was: stop acting like a superior prick just because you've commissioned a bunch of bespoke garments from a foreign tailor. You didn't have to say you thought you were better than NYR - it's rather evident in the "subtext" you keep referring to. One doesn't usually talk down to a person he considers an equal. Also, your "cool with that" statement smacked of classism - funny from someone who purports to never even have considered the subject (the horror! where's the divan, I might faint!) I'm not saying you're necessarily a snob, although that's what the evidence suggests - you might just be an asshole. Finally, I wonder if you've had the opportunity to compare Ercole's work with Ambrosi's? If not, how is your opinion any more valid than NYR's?
post #173 of 1859
Are those Foo's pants? They look great. I guess i can see why everyone puts up with his crap if they look that good.
post #174 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by S. Magnozzi View Post
I know what you're speaking of, and naturally garments will mold to wear and your body over time. That said, I maintain that the general shape is upheld fine by anyone being somewhat capable of handling an iron.

We're not talking about garments molding to the body over time. We're talking about the cutter using an iron to stretch/shrink the cloth so that the garment takes a particular shape even before it is ever worn. This shaping is temporary, and the garment needs to be pressed with a specific technique, preferably by an expert, in order to restore it.
post #175 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by sellahi22 View Post
We're not talking about garments molding to the body over time. We're talking about the cutter using an iron to stretch/shrink the cloth so that the garment takes a particular shape even before it is ever worn. This shaping is temporary, and the garment needs to be pressed with a specific technique, preferably by an expert, in order to restore it.

Again, I am not refuting this. I simply state that the shape will be maintained fine by careful regular pressing (mostly flannels and linens in my case). Whilst I understand and welcome the need for having jackets professionally pressed (by the very tailor if possible), I fail to see the same utility when it comes to trousers.
post #176 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by whnay. View Post
Sick

Nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whnay. View Post
the half pipe was super icy on one side.

Wait, you ride the pipe?!?! Pics or gtfo.
post #177 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post
Wait, you ride the pipe?!?! Pics or gtfo.
Shaun Whnay?
post #178 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post
So if I'm reading correctly, the Ambrosi magic is in the sewing/construction and not the fit?

Ever heard of the magic number referred to as the "golden ratio"?

Let's see...

established that his other pants (hereby labeled "b") have 60% of the handwork of his Ambrosi pants (labeled "a")

So we have:







On the other hand, the golden ratio derived by the quadratic formula is



Yes, you correctly identified a 3% difference between these two numbers.

Is it at all possible that 's 60% number was a little bit of an approximation? I say that's possible... it's possible...
post #179 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post
Shaun Whnay?

whnay's was riding pipe when shawn was still in his diapers. whnay is an old school pipe rider.
post #180 of 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
whnay's was riding pipe when shawn was still in his diapers. whnay is an old school pipe rider.

LULZ
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