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Can having a bachelor's degree work against your career mobility? - Page 3

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
I have not looked into it, but again, it would seem not too many offer them. I have never met anybody who had one or heard of it. Yet, online, I see it mentioned often enough.

Let's get off this. I have known a couple of people in graduate level communications programs and they were highly intelligent and well versed in various areas of math and study design. The concept that somehow Canadian universities are only churning out degrees that are more marketable than ones in US universities is bullshit. You have gone from, "I don't think we have such degrees here in Canada," to just your anecdotal experience of not having met a communications degree person.

To the OP: quit the call center. Just give your notice and quit. Either get further education or seek an employment councilor and just do the leg work to change your employment.
post #32 of 39
I can only speak for the west coast, but it was one of the few (pre. 2008) degrees that students were snapped up from post grad. Mostly PR, Investor Relations, especially with the oil companies and television stations (CTV and CBC) that sort of thing. SFU and UCalgary's are pretty big.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
I have not looked into it, but again, it would seem not too many offer them. I have never met anybody who had one or heard of it. Yet, online, I see it mentioned often enough.
post #33 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice guys.

Just wish there was anything I was remotely interested in getting a masters in.

Hey, maybe Communications! heh...

But after 5 years in this, there's not much of a choice left to make and no time to be picky.
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by justinwillims View Post

If you think a Masters degree would be beneficial to your career prospects but can’t narrow down a master’s degree that you want to pursue, you should think about getting an MBA. A Masters degree in Business gives you a broad base of knowledge on areas such as management, accounts, finance, business development, human resources, etc, all of which are vital to the smooth and efficient operation of any organization in any industry. Supplementing your current degree, an MBA would help you escape the stagnancy of your current job and position by qualifying you for well paying, more satisfying jobs. If you are concerned about the financial aspect of getting this degree, you could even opt for an accredited, established online MBA degree which would allow you to keep your current job while you receive the instruction, experience and credentials required for better employment opportunities.
 


Any benefits to having an MBA when you are a software engineer (in Information Technology)?
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarim View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by justinwillims View Post

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Any benefits to having an MBA when you are a software engineer (in Information Technology)?

I believe you have just become a victim of spam[1].gif
post #36 of 39
It depends on the person. Most people with degrees end up getting stuck because they walk into a place of business acting like they're entitled to things. When on the other hand, you have the guy with no degree who works his butt off and he gets the promotion. The guy with the degree thinks that his piece of paper entitles him to rise in the ranks without working his way up. But people with degrees who think that way always end up getting a reality check.
post #37 of 39
I'm confused by what the OP is saying. I did some preliminary research about Communications careers because I am considering eventually entering that field.

What I found said that Communications is a need that every organization has, and hence there are many employment opportunities for those with education in Communications.

Is that information wrong? Or are the OP's complaints against his Communications degree wrong?

Based on what I know, (which is admittedly limited), my question to the OP is: why the heck did you take a call center job? Doesn't your Communications degree qualify you for much better jobs? That is, with better not meaning "higher up in the call center," but instead meaning "on a whole different level, way above the respectability and financial compensation afforded to call center jobs."

I put the same question to others as well who are not the OP, but perhaps can offer insights as to whether the OP's problem is that he has been/is misusing his degree instead of using it to its potential.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by JesseJB View Post

I cannot seem to grow out of my entry-level call center purgatory (its been 5 years now).

I don't know how having relevant education to include a college degree would hinder one's career.

Not to malign those in this career, but there is the stereotype of the job and those who hold it. If I'm interviewing someone who's held an entry-level position for 5 years... actually, I'm very unlikely to interview someone who's held an entry-level job for that long. I'd feel they have no initiative. Five years and no career progression? It's usually cheaper for companies to promote from within than to hire from outside, i.e., unless you're working for a mom and pop shop there are some opportunities for advancement in almost all firms. However, there could be legit reasons, such as the person was going to school whilst working full time, thus he couldn't take on the additional work responsibilities that come w/ promotion. I'd interview that person.
post #39 of 39

Why not to get a masters or professional degree?

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