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What Skills Give You an Edge in the Workplace? - Page 2

post #16 of 62
creativity. it sounds so simple but it isn't. the truly creative thinkers in any field will always have an edge.
post #17 of 62
confidence trumps competence
post #18 of 62
networking is by far the most valuable skill out there. why do you think people pay ~600k to get MBA degrees?
post #19 of 62
600 k for a MBA degree? Does that degree come in a gem encrusted format?

I firmly believe fake it till you make it, as long as you are smart enough you will always be able to make it.

I think getting along with others and not losing your cool. I noticed alot of blue collars tend to handle problems by finding a cause and blaming someone, a manager doesn't care much about who's to blame he/she only wants to know how to fix it and make sure it doesn't happen again.

I also believe in sizing up people and using them to their strengths.
post #20 of 62
"Networking," at least the way most people seem to understand the concept, is practically worthless. Building meaningful professional relationships with people in tour industry can be incredibly useful. Going to a cocktail reception and shaking the CEO's hand isn't networking -- it's a waste of time.
post #21 of 62
I can put steel on steel in three rounds! Shot over! Oh wait...wrong forum.

Bmac
post #22 of 62
"How to win friends and influence people" by Dale Carniegie is a really good read for any person who wants to be a manager and interact better with people. This is the best book for soft skills As far as skill for hard skills... IMO any skill you have can be out dated; thus, keep your skills updated. Try taking courses, workshops or even learn on your own, the worst thing you can be is outdated. Attempt not to be one of those people that hates change, embrace new things, and try to pick up new skills. The more you learn and can put on your resume will make you more desirable to either your own firm or another firm. Networking is great but as someone said earlier it works when the connections are meaningful. if you are the guy that likes to drink and are a bar buddy, your definitely not the guy they want for the job. my 2c...
post #23 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post
The best thing you can do at a junior/entry level is:

Make yourself as indispensable as possible.
Make an effort to be liked. I think being "respected" is for the bosses. If you can do both, congratulations but I think at a junior level it's more important to be liked than respected.
Be competent.
Be respectful.
Look outside for yourself first and foremost but respect the needs of your workplace and those around you.

These haven't worked for me. And I know what has been keeping me down and I'm not sure how to break free from my own career destroying morality.

Learning how to lie. This apparently happens constantly and it's driving me mad. I'm a horrible liar, someone asks me something and whoops, there's the truth spilling out my stupid mouth.

Boss, "You excited about the staff retreat?"
Me, "No."
Boss, "You don't think you'll learn anything?"
Me, "Not at all."

Fuuuuuuuuuu. Don't ask me shit. I know that I should smile and say that it should be fun and blah blah blah, but it never comes out. FML.


And as mentioned before, schmoozing (aka, brown nosing, ass kissing, being a sycophant). I thought that my work ethic, and my abilities would do the talking for me. WRONG, schmoozing is 100% more effective. I don't go to work to make friends, I go to do my job. I don't care what you did on the weekend, don't care about your children, don't want to go to your backyard BBQ on Saturday, I want to do a good job at work.

I'm really working on this, I'm able to stomach a short convo about mundane things. I finally ask people how they're doing and how their weekend was. And I've learned to smile and pretend like I don't want to run away immediately.

Don't get me wrong, I have some work friends who I will gladly chat with, but those relationships took time to form. I just fail at BS'ing.


The worst part is knowing that my behavior is hurting me, and knowing that I have the power to change it.
post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by celery View Post
These haven't worked for me. And I know what has been keeping me down and I'm not sure how to break free from my own career destroying morality.

Learning how to lie. This apparently happens constantly and it's driving me mad. I'm a horrible liar, someone asks me something and whoops, there's the truth spilling out my stupid mouth.

Boss, "You excited about the staff retreat?"
Me, "No."
Boss, "You don't think you'll learn anything?"
Me, "Not at all."

Fuuuuuuuuuu. Don't ask me shit. I know that I should smile and say that it should be fun and blah blah blah, but it never comes out. FML.


And as mentioned before, schmoozing (aka, brown nosing, ass kissing, being a sycophant). I thought that my work ethic, and my abilities would do the talking for me. WRONG, schmoozing is 100% more effective. I don't go to work to make friends, I go to do my job. I don't care what you did on the weekend, don't care about your children, don't want to go to your backyard BBQ on Saturday, I want to do a good job at work.

I'm really working on this, I'm able to stomach a short convo about mundane things. I finally ask people how they're doing and how their weekend was. And I've learned to smile and pretend like I don't want to run away immediately.

Don't get me wrong, I have some work friends who I will gladly chat with, but those relationships took time to form. I just fail at BS'ing.


The worst part is knowing that my behavior is hurting me, and knowing that I have the power to change it.

dude seriously read How to win friends and influence people by Dale Carnigie, in your case its definitely going to help also The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey... sounds like you need to learn how to socialize a bit better and you'll be fine
post #25 of 62
I might just do that, I need all the help I can get.
post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Carlos View Post
Networking. Learn how to schmooze, kiss ass, politick, and generally introduce yourself to people with whom you would not have occasion to do ordinary business (higher-ups, way-higher-ups, people in different divisions or departments, and so forth). Best workplace skill of them all. It's not a substitute for doing a good job, despite what popular culture would have us believe. But it's every bit as effective as it's always been.

The people who excel at this skill tend to view office politics as a game, and it's a game they like to play. Also, I've noticed that certain types of women tend naturally to excel at this game. It requires a sociability and grace that most men don't have, but which comes easily to many women. Furthermore, women are often viewed as less threatening, less blatantly political, and more charming.

ugh
post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by celery View Post
These haven't worked for me. And I know what has been keeping me down and I'm not sure how to break free from my own career destroying morality.

Learning how to lie. This apparently happens constantly and it's driving me mad. I'm a horrible liar, someone asks me something and whoops, there's the truth spilling out my stupid mouth.

Boss, "You excited about the staff retreat?"
Me, "No."
Boss, "You don't think you'll learn anything?"
Me, "Not at all."

Fuuuuuuuuuu. Don't ask me shit. I know that I should smile and say that it should be fun and blah blah blah, but it never comes out. FML.


And as mentioned before, schmoozing (aka, brown nosing, ass kissing, being a sycophant). I thought that my work ethic, and my abilities would do the talking for me. WRONG, schmoozing is 100% more effective. I don't go to work to make friends, I go to do my job. I don't care what you did on the weekend, don't care about your children, don't want to go to your backyard BBQ on Saturday, I want to do a good job at work.

I'm really working on this, I'm able to stomach a short convo about mundane things. I finally ask people how they're doing and how their weekend was. And I've learned to smile and pretend like I don't want to run away immediately.

Don't get me wrong, I have some work friends who I will gladly chat with, but those relationships took time to form. I just fail at BS'ing.


The worst part is knowing that my behavior is hurting me, and knowing that I have the power to change it.

You sounds like the stereotypical negative coworker.
post #28 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post
You sounds like the stereotypical negative coworker.

+1 that is true,

managers don't want to promote people who are negative, but cant fire them either. A negative person at work will pull down the whole dept and cause more ppl to be negative, thus making it harder to manage people and keep morale up. believe it or not these are real issues at work places...
post #29 of 62
learn to read the underlying messages behind what people are saying, what they really mean.. it's related to the point about seeing things from their perspective, but basically it's listening intelligently. eg, Celery (ninja edit!), when your boss said "You excited about the staff retreat?", he probably didn't really care if you were excited or not. What he probably meant was "you guys have been really sucking lately, I pushed hard to get some funding for a nice retreat and nobody seems to be giving me any appreciation for it, you're always so miserable around the office can this at least chear you up?"... or something like that... so hear that, and then respond the same way... "Oh yeah, I really appreciate that you guys are sending us on this retreat, it should be fun and I'm sure we'll learn a few good points from it. We're always working together but this will be some good time for the team to get to know each other in a more relaxed environment and I'm sure we'll bond better. So yeah, it sounds like it'll be a good time. How're you feeling about it"... notice the follow up question, the guy's obviously thinking about it and wants to tell someone what he's thinking.
post #30 of 62
My greatest skill is schmoozing on the phone with the court clerks. Getting what you need from public workers in a timely manner requires great and nuanced social/communication skills.
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