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Random Amateur Soccer Observations - Page 6

post #76 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

Football is the biggest sport in the world. I never understood why you call it soccer. All the other names for sports make sense like this one, but you don´t you use it the right way, i.e, baseball (base+ball), basketball (baske+ball), handball (hand+ball), football (foot+ball), but what you call football is actually more similar ot rugby- Yes, i know the differences between both sports, but at the end, even though rugby doesn´t stop that much like american football, the end goal is the same, take the ball to the end zone and score a try/touchdown, and then you kick to make the conversion, and you can also kick it between during play and get 3 points. TO get back on track, in american football the foot hardly ever touches the ball (that actually happens more often in rugby, where players can kick the ball forward, so rugby has more right to call itseld football XD). In football, what you call soccer (BTW, where does that word come from? I never bothered to check), the footbal is pretty much touching the ball all the time. I know it might be a silly way to look at it but the reality is everyone else (country) call it by the real name, football, where a player carries the ball across the pitch with his, you guessed it, foot.

I'm an American, so I'm dumb and ignorant of other cultures, but you might be surprised to know that the game was called soccer before it was called football. Usage of the word "football" began as a crude nickname for it among the lower classes of England (sounds like something an American would do, amirite?)
post #77 of 108
Wow, didn´t know that. Since the british invented the sport (though the aztecs - or mayans- played something similar but with the ball going into a high hole and being hipped instead of kicked) I always thought footbal was the original name and didn´t really know why people in the states referred to it as soccer, or actually, where the word came from.
post #78 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

Wow, didn´t know that. Since the british invented the sport (though the aztecs - or mayans- played something similar but with the ball going into a high hole and being hipped instead of kicked) I always thought footbal was the original name and didn´t really know why people in the states referred to it as soccer, or actually, where the word came from.

"Football" originally began as a general term for any peasant sport - gentlemen rode horses for their sports, peasants played on foot. Therefore, by the time "football" came to mean specifically "soccer" in England, several countries (the US, Australia, Ireland for a while) already had sports that were called football. So, in the US and Australia, "football" usually means something different than soccer.

My men's league soccer team is mostly hispanic. It's funny to think about how in Latin America "futbol", (pronounced "football") means soccer, even though "football" translated into Spanish would be something like "patapelota". So in our league, you have Yanks calling it "soccer", while both the expat Brits and hispanics are calling it "football".

Obviously, I'm a big language nerd.
post #79 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

"Football" originally began as a general term for any peasant sport - gentlemen rode horses for their sports, peasants played on foot. Therefore, by the time "football" came to mean specifically "soccer" in England, several countries (the US, Australia, Ireland for a while) already had sports that were called football. So, in the US and Australia, "football" usually means something different than soccer.

I remember reading something to this effect while doing a research paper on the history of World Soccer a semester ago. Felt pretty vindicated. Football was any game not played on horseback, and there were hundreds of derivatives throughout the highlands of the Northern UK (where you'll still find rugby, gaelic football, etc). In "soccer" you could originally pick the ball up with your hands and tackle the carrier (a la rugby now), and rules became codified in specific regions as the games developed there. You had teams down towards London that would "kick & rush" as we know it now, versus groups that focused on dribbling, versus teams that preferred to run with the ball in their hands. It used to all be essentially the same sport with regional variations. Rules only became official as boy's schools tried to compete from different regions of England with other schools, and upon arriving they found very different "games" being played. If you were out in a wide-open field, you used big cross-field passes, whereas if you were more urban and pressed for space you had to dribble more, etc. It's pretty interesting.
post #80 of 108
Being an argentinian and an english teacher, everytime a student says soccer (because it´s the most popular sport here - crazy religious sect like- and we talk about it at length) I end up correcting them and telling them that fútbol is not soccer in english, that is just the way people in the US call football. But having read and found out about all of this will make me address the subjetc differently next time and will make for an interesting talk in classes to come.
Much appreciated the history lesson guys.
post #81 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

Being an argentinian and an english teacher, everytime a student says soccer (because it´s the most popular sport here - crazy religious sect like- and we talk about it at length) I end up correcting them and telling them that fútbol is not soccer in english, that is just the way people in the US call football. But having read and found out about all of this will make me address the subjetc differently next time and will make for an interesting talk in classes to come.
Much appreciated the history lesson guys.

No problem, sorry for being so snotty in my initial reply. Just for curiosity's sake, what would you say is the second-most popular sport in Argentina? Basketball? Baseball? Rodeo?
post #82 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

Being an argentinian and an english teacher, everytime a student says soccer (because it´s the most popular sport here - crazy religious sect like- and we talk about it at length) I end up correcting them and telling them that fútbol is not soccer in english, that is just the way people in the US call football. But having read and found out about all of this will make me address the subjetc differently next time and will make for an interesting talk in classes to come.
Much appreciated the history lesson guys.

The Chinese were the first ones to play a kind of football game..
post #83 of 108
Rodeo rotflmao.gif Basketball could be second, though not really. It´s popular, but mainly because of the national team, which garnered a lot of attention with the golden medal at athens (if i recall correctly) and that runner up position at the indianapolis world cup in 2002 frown.gif I guess probably tennis is the second most popular sport. In the past 10 years we´ve had a great "batch" of very talented players like gaudio, nalbandian, coria, cañas, puerta. They´ve won lots of titles, from MS1000, Master Cup (now ATP World Tour Finals) to GS (gaudio at RG and delpo at the US Open). And (with this year) we´ve reached 3 davis cup finals and haven´t been out of the world group in more than a decade. And a lot of kids are playing right now. At the club where I go to take classes and play tournaments, there are tons of kids playing, and I´m talking about a windy city in the middle of patagonia. And without the possibility of playing outdoors most of the time (´cause of the weather), the kids still play in national tournaments and the club, along with another small club (with only one court) organize tournaments together and stuff. In Buenos Aires it is a whole different deal. Lots of places to play, loads of clubs and courts... yet it´s still hard to reach the top, specially with the financial issue here and how weak our currency is.
Rugby could also be another sport that is followed and played a lot. I don´t know much about it because I´ve never really played it - it´s not my kind of sport - but it is quite the popular sport. We have some very good players and a more than decent national team (Los Pumas, who are playing against the All Blacks in the quarterfinals of the World Cup), but in terms of popularity, it´s no where near football, and because of success, it´s the same with tennis. I think those are the 3 most important sport we´ve been succesfull in during this time (football, tennis and basket). One could aslo mention Las Leonas, our national women´s hockey team, who have won I don´t know how many world cups and other very important tournaments; yet the thing is Hockey is a bit elitist here, so there´s no real opportunity for any girl to play, because the clubs charge ridicously amount of money for becoming a member and the sticks tend to be a tad expensive.
post #84 of 108
Thread Starter 
Cool, thanks. You laugh at rodeo, but Brasil has arguably the best rodeo talent in the world.
post #85 of 108
There´s no rodeo here, at least as far as I´m aware. We have something called jineteadas, which in part has something that you´d see in rodeo, but I don´t know if it´s considered a sport, and if it is, it definately doesn´t have a huge popularity as any of the other sports mentioned.
post #86 of 108
Thread Starter 
post #87 of 108
Polo is super huge in Argentina as well, at least to the degree Rugby is, especially among the wealthier classes because they're both prep school sports.
post #88 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

Polo is super huge in Argentina as well, at least to the degree Rugby is, especially among the wealthier classes because they're both prep school sports.

Polo will be difficult to play in slumbs..

They will eat the horses if they could afford them...
post #89 of 108

hahahahahhha... yeah, we´re the best at polo.. for real. But it´s super exclusive.

post #90 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

hahahahahhha... yeah, we´re the best at polo.. for real. But it´s super exclusive.


Argentinians are the best polo players in the world...

No doubt about that...

The question is ; Do the Argentinians do really care about that?
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