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Gaziano & Girling Appreciation & Shoe Appreciation Thread (including reviews, purchases, pictures, etc...) - Page 828

post #12406 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulianL View Post

My experience is that EG and G&G sizing, at least for the TG73 last, are very different.

I have one pair of EG in 888 and one pair of G&G in TG73. My G&G TG73 (the pair I first got) is a UK size 7D and it pinches my toes something terrible. I find the toe box far too small and can't wear them comfortably for more than a few hours. The problem is all in the toe box because elsewhere the fit is either OK or loose. My EG 888 is a UK size 6.5D and if anything it's slightly too big. I still have some room in the toe box so I'm considering sizing down to a 6.5C or maybe a 6D in order to get a snugger fit at the heel to get rid of some heel slip.

I'm told by EG that I don't have duck feet at all, in fact that my toes taper in to my big toe very nicely on both feet, so it doesn't seem to be down to me having totally weird feet. My experience is that the toe box on a TG73 really is narrow.

Another point on G&G sizing is that, if you find the Deco last too pointy for your tastes then, in addition to the fit issues that I already mentioned, be very cautious about sizing a TG73 down to a narrower fitting for aesthetic reasons. Going to a narrower width accentuates the standard level of pointiness of the TG73 last and mine ended up looking rather too much like the Deco last for my liking.

- Julian

I have the same problem here Julian. I fit perfectly well on EG888 7E but had such terrible experience with fitting on TG73. Based on conventional advice, I tried on TG73 7E but the shoe is so tight I can't even walk with it, so then I took a half width up to 7F and it fits perfectly - except the toes, the toe box pinches so badly I hardly wear them now, I tried half size up to 7.5E but the shoe is too lengthy.

All in all, the fitting problems I have with GG are almost to the point of giving up (while I fit so perfectly on EG most standard E last). Maybe I should try MH71 some point in time
post #12407 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by kydy View Post

...

All in all, the fitting problems I have with GG are almost to the point of giving up (while I fit so perfectly on EG most standard E last). Maybe I should try MH71 some point in time

 

Sorry to hear that you're having problems as well kydy. Trying an MH71 is on my list of things to try as well. Luckily I live in London so can call into the G&G store. When G&G only had the little display area in the basement on the other side of Savile Row the fitting options weren't good. They only had their full range of sizes in the DG70 last which they used as their fitting pairs and it wasn't possible to try on any other lasts. Hopefully the fitting experience is a whole lot more comprehensive now that they have a proper store.

 

Unfortunately my fit isn't perfect on the EG 888 last either, I have significant slip on my left heel. Trying to address my EG fit issues is still plan A because I love the 888 last but G&G MH71 is definitely plan B. Bespoke is probably plan C but I'd really prefer to find a standard fitting that works for me because my tastes are quite mainstream so I wouldn't get any style advantage from bespoke. Both the EG and G&G MTO programs have enough style and colour options to feed my buying habits for at least the next couple of decades.

 

- Julian

post #12408 of 21786
Thanks for the input. It does make me a bit apprehensive buying blind based on my 888 fitting. Luckily I like the MH71 last as well, although I have read that all GG lasts fit the same.
post #12409 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsuo View Post


Has anyone tried the above with any success? Can you elaborate on your experience? Thank you!

About the creasing with pens, and not pencils, as the plastic is harder...I have tried them with cordovan with great success.  I believe calf is a little more independent as to where it wants the crease, but use, its a good idea to give guidance on initial wears. The problem though is if there is a lot of room, which is the reason why you want to guide the crease, it can go in its own direction...bit of hit and miss. As I say, due to the properties of cordovan, giving it a memory crease does work better on these leathers.

post #12410 of 21786
Are we talking about using the pencil/pen creasing technique while wearing the shoe, or with shoe in hand? Just wanted to clarify...
post #12411 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

Are we talking about using the pencil/pen creasing technique while wearing the shoe, or with shoe in hand? Just wanted to clarify...

IMO, this should be done while wearing the shoe. If the shoe is in hand, the lines of "natural" creasing--where the foot itself wants to bend--will not be apparent. Any creases made while the shoe is in hand will be suborned to what the foot ultimately wants, but, at the same time, the leather itself will be creased. And those marginal, out-of-place creases will be hard to remove entirely.

This is one of the reasons the common (and ignorant) practice of flexing a new shoe by casual "window shoppers" is so anathema.

If the foot is in the shoe when the creasing technique is done, placement of the pens or pencils can be adjusted in the early stages of the initial creasing so that the creases are consistent with where the foot actually wants to bend.
post #12412 of 21786
Thanks DW for a fine explanation, as always.
post #12413 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

Thanks DW for a fine explanation, as always.

Yr. Hmb. Svt.



--
Edited by DWFII - 7/1/14 at 7:43am
post #12414 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by daizawaguy View Post
 

About the creasing with pens, and not pencils, as the plastic is harder...I have tried them with cordovan with great success.  I believe calf is a little more independent as to where it wants the crease, but use, its a good idea to give guidance on initial wears. The problem though is if there is a lot of room, which is the reason why you want to guide the crease, it can go in its own direction...bit of hit and miss. As I say, due to the properties of cordovan, giving it a memory crease does work better on these leathers.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


IMO, this should be done while wearing the shoe. If the shoe is in hand, the lines of "natural" creasing--where the foot itself wants to bend--will not be apparent. Any creases made while the shoe is in hand will be suborned to what the foot ultimately wants, but, at the same time, the leather itself will be creased. And those marginal, out-of-place creases will be hard to remove entirely.

This is one of the reasons the common (and ignorant) practice of flexing a new shoe by casual "window shoppers" is so anathema.

If the foot is in the shoe when the creasing technique is done, placement of the pens or pencils can be adjusted in the early stages of the initial creasing so that the creases are consistent with where the foot actually wants to bend.

 

Thank you both very much!  

 

DWF, I remember you mentioned this on the Shoe Care thread but found the quote in this thread first.  I did try the creasing out on one shoe from a pair of new shoes. It feels wrong to put such deep creases in an uncreased shoe but I know it can be very useful.  In an old pair of G&Gs I had, there was inconsistent density in the vamp/cap toe and my flexing put pressure on a small crease in the middle of the toe cap!  I'm hoping if I set the crease early and make it deep/thorough so that all of the flex of the shoe can be "absorbed" in fewer creases than what might otherwise naturally occur.  

Thanks again!

post #12415 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsuo View Post

Has anyone tried the above with any success? Can you elaborate on your experience? Thank you!

Wow, we definitely need Youtube video of this.
post #12416 of 21786
Having the shoe crease in two deep, broad, creases is preferable, IMO, to creasing in six shallow creases.

And if the shoe is a little "off" with regard to fit/sizing, those two creases can be directed across the shoe and parallel to each other rather than at an angle or several angles as is prone to happen in some feet and in most shoes when they are not fit correctly.
post #12417 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Having the shoe crease in two deep, broad, creases is preferable, IMO, to creasing in six shallow creases.

And if the shoe is a little "off" with regard to fit/sizing, those two creases can be directed across the shoe and parallel to each other rather than at an angle or several angles as is prone to happen in some feet and in most shoes when they are not fit correctly.

Are you suggesting these two creases are made by each pen(cil) held parallel to each other across the vamp?
post #12418 of 21786

Sadly, not G & Gs, but here is a pair of boots I used this technique on. Great hint thanks, DWF.

 

As you can see the creasing shows good symmetry between the two boots.

 

Done with two Bic pens pressed into the vamp just behind the toe cap.

 

If you're doing it by yourself, put one shoe on, kneel down keeping the shod foot flat on the ground, press the pens into the vamp in the desired pattern, and raise your heel a few times. Repeat for the other shoe. Done.

 

Very little force or repetitions required. The first creases you put in the shoe will set the pattern. As the creases set so easily, I expect this would only work well with new out of the box shoes. If the shoe has been worn at all, I suspect it is too late.

post #12419 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

 

 

Done with two Bic pens pressed into the vamp just behind the toe cap.

 

If you're doing it by yourself, put one shoe on, kneel down keeping the shod foot flat on the ground, press the pens into the vamp in the desired pattern, and raise your heel a few times. Repeat for the other shoe. Done.

 

Very little force or repetitions required. The first creases you put in the shoe will set the pattern. As the creases set so easily, I expect this would only work well with new out of the box shoes. If the shoe has been worn at all, I suspect it is too late.

 

   thank you sir. the description is precisely how I visualized it and will be used on a new boot asap

post #12420 of 21786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

Sadly, not G & Gs, but here is a pair of boots I used this technique on. Great hint thanks, DWF.



As you can see the creasing shows good symmetry between the two boots.

Done with two Bic pens pressed into the vamp just behind the toe cap.

If you're doing it by yourself, put one shoe on, kneel down keeping the shod foot flat on the ground, press the pens into the vamp in the desired pattern, and raise your heel a few times. Repeat for the other shoe. Done.

Very little force or repetitions required. The first creases you put in the shoe will set the pattern. As the creases set so easily, I expect this would only work well with new out of the box shoes. If the shoe has been worn at all, I suspect it is too late.

Now we have to dispose of all of our shoes and start buying them new again so we could create a proper creases.
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