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Gaziano & Girling Appreciation & Shoe Appreciation Theard - Page 162

post #2416 of 12485
Handmade luxury goods often take longer to make than we would wish. The best approach is to consider it part of the deal.

If you can't stand the wait then your only recourse is to consider another maker next time. But this is where it all breaks down - because there aren't so many good ones out there, are there?

You think it's tough getting shoes - try getting a $500,000 hand made murano glass chandelier on time. We normally advise our clients to assume at least 6 months later than quoted by the maker and to not get too upset if it's any less than a year late.

Art and commerce are a tough mix. If you wants the good stuff done your way you gots ta wait!

Regarding shoemakers, I do wish they would give you more realistic estimates however, it seems unproffesional to make promises you can't keep. I'd rather be told that I have to wait six months and receive them in five than be told two months and receive them in five.
post #2417 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Regarding shoemakers, I do wish they would give you more realistic estimates however, it seems unproffesional to make promises you can't keep. I'd rather be told that I have to wait six months and receive them in five than be told two months and receive them in five.

I think this point is more in the spirit of my question. I think it's better to surprise or deliver than keep people waiting. You go from having people peeved that they are waiting longer to thrilled that they got their order early. If anything it might make a customer feel special. As if their order was always at the front of the line.

I suppose the inverse to all this is that some people might be scared off from buying with overly realistic timelines. However, especially with luxury products, anyone that's made their mind up is in it one way or another.
post #2418 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

I think this point is more in the spirit of my question. I think it's better to surprise or deliver than keep people waiting. You go from having people peeved that they are waiting longer to thrilled that they got their order early. If anything it might make a customer feel special. As if their order was always at the front of the line.
I suppose the inverse to all this is that some people might be scared off from buying with overly realistic timelines. However, especially with luxury products, anyone that's made their mind up is in it one way or another.

Imagine God did this with cancer. You would have an entirely different feeling. Isn't that crazy?
post #2419 of 12485
CLEARLY you haven't read my DNR.
post #2420 of 12485
Lemme read, lemme read!
post #2421 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

I think this point is more in the spirit of my question. I think it's better to surprise or deliver than keep people waiting. You go from having people peeved that they are waiting longer to thrilled that they got their order early. If anything it might make a customer feel special. As if their order was always at the front of the line.
I suppose the inverse to all this is that some people might be scared off from buying with overly realistic timelines. However, especially with luxury products, anyone that's made their mind up is in it one way or another.

Never underestimate the increase in 'perceived value' that can be associated with an extra long lead time. In other words.......if a shoe that takes six months to get is good how great must a shoe that takes a year to get be?
post #2422 of 12485
I have been ordering shoes that I don't want because there is probably a 90% chance I will like them in 9 months.
post #2423 of 12485
crackup[1].gif
post #2424 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Never underestimate the increase in 'perceived value' that can be associated with an extra long lead time. In other words.......if a shoe that takes six months to get is good how great must a shoe that takes a year to get be?

This is true. I always underestimate the stupidity of people. I'm so stupid.
post #2425 of 12485
Thread Starter 
who in said? the best things in life are worth the wait?
post #2426 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by luk-cha View Post

who in said? the best things in life are worth the wait?

true
post #2427 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

I think this point is more in the spirit of my question. I think it's better to surprise or deliver than keep people waiting. You go from having people peeved that they are waiting longer to thrilled that they got their order early. If anything it might make a customer feel special. As if their order was always at the front of the line.
I suppose the inverse to all this is that some people might be scared off from buying with overly realistic timelines. However, especially with luxury products, anyone that's made their mind up is in it one way or another.

There is a risk by “surprising” clients by having their shoes delivered too early, and thus making them “feel special”. The client will be disappointed the next time if the delivery is late (or even on time). I run a company in the IT-service sector (no you can’t make a living being the trade agent of Gaziano & Girling and Rubinacci). We try to maintain a balanced service level that is neither above nor below the client’s expectations. The key is actually managing client expectation more than anything else. This might sound weird, but people in general (at least in Sweden, yes maybe we Swedes are a bit boring) will rather have a dependable supplier that delivers on time instead of a supplier with erratic distribution of their services. That said, I think luxury goods consumers have a different mindset and realize that this is a special business where delivery times are a bit more irregular. I think leather suppliers, last manufacturers, shoe tree suppliers and all other subcontractors involved in the actual making of one pair of G&G makes keeping a steady flow of shoes leaving the factory (and to be honest it’s more of an atelier than a proper factory) extremely challenging.
post #2428 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by luk-cha View Post

who in said? the best things in life are worth the wait?

"What is best in life?" by the governator.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaves View Post

There is a risk by “surprising” clients by having their shoes delivered too early, and thus making them “feel special”. The client will be disappointed the next time if the delivery is late (or even on time). I run a company in the IT-service sector (no you can’t make a living being the trade agent of Gaziano & Girling and Rubinacci). We try to maintain a balanced service level that is neither above nor below the client’s expectations. The key is actually managing client expectation more than anything else. This might sound weird, but people in general (at least in Sweden, yes maybe we Swedes are a bit boring) will rather have a dependable supplier that delivers on time instead of a supplier with erratic distribution of their services. That said, I think luxury goods consumers have a different mindset and realize that this is a special business where delivery times are a bit more irregular. I think leather suppliers, last manufacturers, shoe tree suppliers and all other subcontractors involved in the actual making of one pair of G&G makes keeping a steady flow of shoes leaving the factory (and to be honest it’s more of an atelier than a proper factory) extremely challenging.

I saw this interview for a pilot for Airforce One where he said they would routinely add extra time (maybe 15-20 minutes extra) for their expected arrival in case of a delay. If they were early, they would circle, and land precisely on time.
post #2429 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Handmade luxury goods often take longer to make than we would wish. The best approach is to consider it part of the deal.
If you can't stand the wait then your only recourse is to consider another maker next time. But this is where it all breaks down - because there aren't so many good ones out there, are there?
You think it's tough getting shoes - try getting a $500,000 hand made murano glass chandelier on time. We normally advise our clients to assume at least 6 months later than quoted by the maker and to not get too upset if it's any less than a year late.
Art and commerce are a tough mix. If you wants the good stuff done your way you gots ta wait!
Regarding shoemakers, I do wish they would give you more realistic estimates however, it seems unproffesional to make promises you can't keep. I'd rather be told that I have to wait six months and receive them in five than be told two months and receive them in five.

i just want to say that its awesome that you sell chandeliers for half a mil. fistbump.gif
post #2430 of 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

i just want to say that its awesome that you sell chandeliers for half a mil. fistbump.gif

I spend my life in terror of unhappy clients. butbut.gif
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