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Trump is #2 in GOP Field - Page 92

post #1366 of 8748
http://thefederalist.com/2016/02/16/how-facebook-envy-fuels-donald-trump/
Quote:
Talk to Trump supporters anywhere and it comes out almost immediately, this measuring of one’s life against others that feeds a constant sense of injury. So much of what seems to bother them is not the actual condition of their lives, but the relative condition of their lives. I personally know people who, with only a high-school education, own their homes, drive expensive vehicles, and have children who’ve completed college. Without hesitation, they will say they’re supporting Trump—apparently because he’s going to change all that. So much of what seems to bother them is not the actual condition of their lives, but the relative condition of their lives.

In other words, Trump (and Sanders) have convinced people that the same socioeconomic arrangements that once benefited them are actually screwing them, mostly on the premise that it’s not benefiting them enough.

No one factor explains Trump, but this underlying resentment is at least in part a result of the Information Age, which is spurring one of the biggest experiments in relative deprivation in human history. People who once had little idea how others outside of their social circle lived now constantly compare themselves not just to their neighbors, but to the wealthy, and even to the super-wealthy. They are not just keeping up with the Joneses next door, but via the Internet and cable they’re keeping up with the Reeds down the street, the Browns in the next town, the Smiths in the next state, and the Kardashians all the way across the country.

As one wag on Twitter put it, call it the “HGTV Effect.”

This is only possible because of new technology. When I was a kid growing up in a working-class home in the 1960s and 1970s, I knew there were people who were far better off than we were. I didn’t really know any of them, and I had no real idea how they lived. I rarely found myself in a house or apartment that was far nicer than my own. Everyone I knew was working-class or poorer. The rich didn’t live in my neighborhood.
Today, Americans live—at least in a virtual sense—in other people’s homes every day.

Today, Americans live—at least in a virtual sense—in other people’s homes every day. They stay connected on social media, constantly inundating each other with pictures of vacations, graduations, and other life achievements and trophies. This occurs despite the fact, as Charles Murray recently pointed out, that people of different classes spend less actual time around each other in real life than ever before. The actual gulf among classes is wider, but the distance between them online is nonexistent.

This preoccupation with other people’s lives isn’t healthy. We know it isn’t healthy, not just because it’s common sense, but because it’s actually been studied. Frequent Facebook users, for example, who tended to compare their own lives to those of their friends “experienced feelings of envy” and “were more likely to identify with statements corresponding to depression.” Well, of course they do: social media is like that.


As if this weren’t bad enough, the faux egalitarianism at the center of post-1960s liberalism has created a sense of entitlement that is drowning every social class in America. It is especially toxic when wedded to our therapeutic culture, in which human failings mean nothing. If you’re not as rich as the guy you friended, it’s not because you’re untalented, it’s because things are unfair. If that house on the Internet isn’t yours, it’s because some “elitist” rigged the game. If you can’t get it, someone has to pay. If you’re not as rich as the guy you friended, it’s not because you’re untalented, it’s because things are unfair.

And what’s Donald Trump about, if not making people pay? Trump promises revenge for every imagined slight or insult, and nothing is more insulting than losing out to your virtual neighbors. People who love Trump love him because if they had his money, they’d be Trump: leveling the playing field literally and figuratively with lawsuits and wrecking balls, getting even with everyone who prevented their obviously deserved success. (Sanders wants to do the same thing. He just wants to do it with the tax code.)

Yes, people are hurting. The U.S. economy has changed, irrevocably, and cheap manufacturing has gone overseas. Those jobs are not coming back, no matter what Trump or any other fantasist promises. A better government than the one we have now would find faster ways to clear the debris of big-state liberalism and spur job creation, while doing more to cushion the impact of global changes in the economy.

But that’s not what’s driving Trump’s ugliest supporters, the ones posting on Twitter and Facebook about how they’re finally going to get their way against everyone else. For most of them, things have gone their way more than they will ever acknowledge. These are not, after all, Appalachia’s children sending stupid memes about Muslims and Mexicans around the Internet all day. These are people tapping out on expensive laptops and smartphones angry messages about how deprived they feel. These are people tapping out on expensive laptops and smartphones angry messages about how deprived they feel.

They are tormented by seeing every day on their screens friends and neighbors whose lives seem better than theirs. Of course, celebrities—whom they feel they know as peers because of the false intimacy of the Internet—clearly live better than they do. Coached by liberalism and taunted by technology, otherwise sensible people embrace the angry rationalization that these electronically sanitized lifestyles are just out of their reach only because of some hidden unfairness.

This unreasonable, insecure resentment has never had a better champion than one of the most unreasonable and insecure human beings ever to pollute American public life: Donald J. Trump.

There are decent, hard-working people in America right now who are scared, and for good reason. The world’s changing fast. They want someone to reflect those fears and to acknowledge them. If they’d turn down Trump’s angry bellow, they might realize that there are other candidates who will speak for them.
post #1367 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post

You know as an old wobbly I love Bernies rhetoric but the things he's talking about have a snowballs chance in hell . Does this "youth" support ever look up from their phones 

The thing with Bernie's supposed revolution is that it's 100% centered on "getting him elected," with the next step apparently being "magic."

There's no slate of pro-Bernie Senators and Congressmen. Even with universal support from Democratic legislators, which he won't get, there's no serious plan to win the House. There aren't enough youth voters in all the deep-red districts to have any hope of flipping them to someone with that kind of agenda.


I suppose you could say it's worth electing him just to make the point that the country values some of those concerns, but people need to stop being delusional and thinking he's going to somehow pass all these huge spending programs.
post #1368 of 8748
^good article suited. There's a lot of stuff in there that's bigger than just explaining Trump (or Sanders). There's a microcosm of some of the problems of modern culture in there.
post #1369 of 8748
Apparently Mitt has some bombshell about Trump's taxes? Is it too late for Mitt to run? I think he would actually beat Hillary.
post #1370 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

^good article suited. There's a lot of stuff in there that's bigger than just explaining Trump (or Sanders). There's a microcosm of some of the problems of modern culture in there.

 

Agreed.  I don't get the envy we have today - the article points out why it is a bigger factor - but I don't get why people are so envious generally.  Someone's wealth or income doesn't injure me (generally speaking).  Good for Trump for enjoying his inheritence or for Jeff Bezos for building such a fortune or whoever.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Apparently Mitt has some bombshell about Trump's taxes? Is it too late for Mitt to run? I think he would actually beat Hillary.


I have probably posted something similar before, but... I obviously don't know Romney, but from what I've read about him, he seems like a good guy, and I think he'd be a neat guy to meet.  If I could have dinner with any of the candidates over the past few elections, he would certainly be near the top of the list.

post #1371 of 8748
Donald Trump is the only way American citizen can flip a middle finger to his utterly corrupt government without being thrown in jail or put on a list.
Edited by Medwed - 2/26/16 at 7:28am
post #1372 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I have probably posted something similar before, but... I obviously don't know Romney, but from what I've read about him, he seems like a good guy, and I think he'd be a neat guy to meet.  If I could have dinner with any of the candidates over the past few elections, he would certainly be near the top of the list.

I didn't say anything at the time but I actually got to have lunch with Mitt last election cycle (along with about 40 other people). Lunch was fine, as he doesn't drink, and who wants dinner without a drink?
post #1373 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Apparently Mitt has some bombshell about Trump's taxes? Is it too late for Mitt to run? I think he would actually beat Hillary.

CNN had some panel of Republican drones on last night, and it was hilarious listening to some of them shill for Trump. They were all pissed off at Mitt for going after Trump, explicitly stating that it should be Democrats asking those questions.

Like last week it was Fox News bashing Trump and nobody blinked. Now they're falling over each other to get behind him. Hilarious.
post #1374 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


I didn't say anything at the time but I actually got to have lunch with Mitt last election cycle (along with about 40 other people). Lunch was fine, as he doesn't drink, and who wants dinner without a drink?

 

Damn Mormons.

post #1375 of 8748

@suited good article I could not agree more . 

post #1376 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Apparently Mitt has some bombshell about Trump's taxes? Is it too late for Mitt to run? I think he would actually beat Hillary.

 

Romney's statement was full of wiggle words:

 

"We have good reason to believe that there's a bombshell in Donald Trump's taxes."

 

He's just the latest GOP establishment hack taking a swipe at Trump.

post #1377 of 8748
Pio you really think Mitt could take on Hildawg? He got ethered by Obummer.
post #1378 of 8748
Also guys. Did Rubio and Cruz gangbangstump Trump last night? Was hoping for some nice CE live poasting discussion to read this morning. For shame guys.
post #1379 of 8748

Funs over,those guys are making everyone with half a brain all hibbeldy jibbeldy

post #1380 of 8748
Quote:
Originally Posted by toothsomesound View Post

Pio you really think Mitt could take on Hildawg? He got ethered by Obummer.

Many people find Obama likable and he's a good looking guy. Hillary is just a fugly banshee and completely unlikable. Even many Dems find her to be a completely untrustworthy bitch. Yeah, I do think if Mitt had launched a good campaign, and got the nomination again, he could have beat Hillary in a straight up race. I think Trump would go third party at this point and that would hand the race to Hillary.
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