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*** The official and awesome DIY thread *** - Page 61

post #901 of 1071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stissius View Post

 

That looks great. Where did you get the fabric? And where did you learn to make shirts? I've been toying with the idea myself since I've been looking for a very specific shirt, but haven't been able to find anything like it. I've been doing things like hemming pants, making pocket squares and easy things like that to improve my tailoring skills. Was it hard to make or does it just take lots of practice?


Yes, amazing! Please write a little about how you made it

post #902 of 1071

I can recommend http://www.amazon.com/Shirtmaking-Developing-Skills-Fine-Sewing/dp/1561582646/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373368198&sr=8-1&keywords=shirtmaking

 

Get the accompanying DVD, well worth it.

post #903 of 1071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stissius View Post

That looks great. Where did you get the fabric? And where did you learn to make shirts? I've been toying with the idea myself since I've been looking for a very specific shirt, but haven't been able to find anything like it. I've been doing things like hemming pants, making pocket squares and easy things like that to improve my tailoring skills. Was it hard to make or does it just take lots of practice?

I got this particular fabric from Mood Fabric in NYC. They have an excellent website you can buy from. Get swatches etc. I also have bought from fabric.com with great results.

A book called The practical guide to pattern making for fashion designers: menswear by Knowles. It taught me to take measurements and draft patterns.

It took me 6 practice shirts of muslin cheap-o practice fabric shirts to get it right. There is a lot of quirks to the process that YouTube helped with. YouTube setting in a shirt sleeve and see what I mean. But you just have to go for it and find the method that works for you.

I'm glad I stuck with it. I'm almost done my next shirt. Ps. Sacrifice a shirt that you know fits good but you don't wear much anymore. That "cadaver" shirt has taught me so much by taking apart the seems and laying it flat. Plus you can see the order of pieces in construction.

Finally. The collar makes the shirt. Practice that the most. Good luck!
post #904 of 1071

How is my paint chip patina look?

took some old shoes and painted them up

 

 

 

 

post #905 of 1071
The painted uppers look kind of neat, but I'd switch the sole color, pronto. Then find some black or off-white laces if you can -- those are a little blinding.
post #906 of 1071

Cool, I have some black laces.

Thinking of switching the bottoms up to neon yellow, maybe gold.

depends what I can find.

post #907 of 1071
So here are a few pics of things I've made for myself.

First, a man's valet, with spots for cufflinks and collar stays. Brazilian cherry with black walnut accents. Designed and built by me.
photo IMG_3798_zps08587552.jpgphoto IMG_3800_zps6dbab517.jpg

In the valet are a number of cufflinks I also made myself.

Next up is probably my favorite blazer -- a Huntsman sent to me by an awesome fellow SFer and that I swapped out the buttons on.
photo IMG_3802_zpsd64f1b9d.jpg

And this is one of the several cotton squares I rolled the edges on. Corners still need a little work, but I'm getting better.
photo IMG_3801_zps8d7d5aff.jpg

And last is a clock I made from plans in Popular Woodworking. Made true through tenons, rather than fake appliqued ones.
photo IMG_3796_zps3ee4b208.jpgphoto IMG_3797_zpsfd9ccbaf.jpg
post #908 of 1071

Finished up my second shirt. The Oystermen Work Shirt.

 

I was digging trough some archival text and photos of Chesapeake Bay watermen, boats, work life, etc. for some inspiration to create a work shirt that was not the same ole thing I have seen a million times. I came across a worker called an Oystermen. Read up on the work they did. And pieced together what I thought would have been authentic for the 1940's Chesapeake Bay watermen.

Hand tonging for oysters is a signature sight of the Chesapeake Bay, as has been for over 250 years. Tonging is the oldest way to gather oysters by use of long polls pulled up from a depth of 20 feet or more. Real muscle is needed to maneuver and lift these tongs, which catch and lift oysters to the the water’s surface. Tonging watermen face slow, backbreaking work. And I would imagine them needing a shirt as tough as the work they did. a shirt like this.

- 6.5 oz red line selvage costal blue chambray, which is a strong cotton weaved fabric similar in structure to denim.
- Triple stitched for strength.
- Hidden half placket keeps the bottom half of the shirt buttons covered to avoid getting snagged on the water men's bibs or ripped off from the tongs.
- Throat latch to keep out the chill of the air.
- Engineers' patch chest pockets for easy access with work gloves on. 
- Underarm gussets for mobility and extra strength.

I hope the photos do the color justice. It's such a rich vibrant color. I'll be wearing this shirt a lot. What do you all think?

 

 

 

rolling up the sleeves exposes some red line selvage

 

this pic is more accurate of the color.

 

 

hidden half placket

 

 

 

 

post #909 of 1071
Love it. You have some real talent.
post #910 of 1071
Went ahead and made an MA+ accordion wallet. I'm really happy with it to replace my old, old cardholder. This is nice and thin, and only a bit bigger than a credit card! I used thin lamb leather. I can post my pattern and instructions if anyone wants, it's really easy to do. There are only 8 stitches in the wallet. I've been using it for about a month and everything is holding very well biggrin.gif



post #911 of 1071
^ nice stuff there firefly. I might make one for myself. Where did you get the leather from?
post #912 of 1071
Quote:
Originally Posted by fireflygrave View Post

Went ahead and made an MA+ accordion wallet. I'm really happy with it to replace my old, old cardholder. This is nice and thin, and only a bit bigger than a credit card! I used thin lamb leather. I can post my pattern and instructions if anyone wants, it's really easy to do. There are only 8 stitches in the wallet. I've been using it for about a month and everything is holding very well biggrin.gif
 

Yes! Please post pattern and instructions that a toddler could follow. Also, +1 to onijo, any idea where I could buy some leather?

post #913 of 1071
I literally just googled "memphis leather shop" and went and looked for something suitably thin. It was like 30 bucks for a pretty big piece, I've made two wallets (one for my dad for father's day) and still have tons left.

Things you will need: leather of your choice, thread, needle, awl, bone folder (or letter opener, or pen- something to crease your folds with), water, towel, pencil, scissors, superglue if you are very lazy like me smile.gif

I made the pattern out of paper and then traced it onto the leather to cut out. You can also get practice about where the folds go. I can edit dimensions into this post if people really need it, but I just folded the paper around a credit card and gave some space on all sides and went with it. I don't know the measurements but I can measure it if needed biggrin.gif

main body


crease the main body as shown, fold side flaps over like this.



fold along your diagonal creases (45 degree angle folds btw) into an accordion to make the pockets of the wallet.





cut a coin pocket a little less wide than the middle section of the main wallet, and with the two body sections a bit less "tall" than the height of the rectangle in the middle of the pattern (see first image and its the middle section). make the flap however long you want, some people fold it over all the card slots too. crease as shown.



fold up the pocket and slide it into the middle accordion fold.



you can optionally cut a rectangle the same size as one side of the coin pocket to divide the front card slot into two slots. this is what I did.



slide that into the front accordion fold.



Once you've made this paper version, get out your leather and a pencil. trace the pieces onto the leather and cut them out. you may have to shave down some dimensions due to the leather's thickness, but wait until you've tried putting it together before you cut! losing a millimeter off a side is way better than having to recut or buy more leather.

To fold the leather, put a metal ruler or some kind of straight edge to fold over, then press on the fold with your bone folder or pen or envelope opener or whatever to crease it. It will help if you wet the leather down with a towel before you try to crease it hard. Put the leather wallet together the same way you did the paper. If everything fits together and you don't need to trim anything, you are ready to sew it together!

Okay I was wrong in my earlier post, there are 10 stitches in the wallet. basically you just need to punch through the top and bottom of each fold of the accordion and the pocket or divider beneath. This is hard to explain in words, but here is a picture which hopefully helps?



you do the same thing on the other side. you need to then sew through the punched holes. 15 loops should do it. You can try to knot the thread off, but I couldn't find a way to do it inside the fold. I just tucked the end into the fold and put a tiny dot of superglue in there.

I also sewed the top folds together so they wouldn't open as much.



That's really it! You could sew a cross into it if you really want it to be like MA+.

...that was a long post! I expect to see some pictures of you guy's wallets after all that work lol8[1].gif
Edited by fireflygrave - 7/16/13 at 1:31pm
post #914 of 1071
Dude, that is an excellent post with much needed details. Never thought you would post all these on short notice. Thanks!

I was holding back the idea of making one after not being able to get a source for a good piece of leather. Gonna get down to working on this right now.

Diglet- will keep you in the loop if i get hold of some decent quality leather.
post #915 of 1071
No problem! Having a lazy day today biggrin.gif If anybody needs more detailed instructions with any of the steps, just post and I will try and take more photos to show it better!
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