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*** The official and awesome DIY thread *** - Page 86

post #1276 of 1349
yeah, the green one seems to be some kind of soviet military coat. very heavy, unlined, felted wool with a perfect shawl collar roll and a cool dimensional fit. i'll try to post a fit pic once it's cold enough to wear it, but for now here's the terrible photo from the ebay auction:



the herringbone coat is vintage aquascutum. heavy, thick wool, big lapels, with fabric that's like a bolder version of what's used in lemaire's owl coat:


post #1277 of 1349

That herringbone tweed is uber cool. Looks like John Benders coat in The Breakfast Club. Jealous.

 

 

msg-132251202099.jpg

post #1278 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ertu View Post

Incredible. Did you use a sewing machine or sew it all by hand? How long does something like that take?

Thanks for the kind words. Yes, it's all sewn by hand (europen saddle stitch - think Hermes). No machines whatsoever.

This bag was roughly 16 hours from first cut to final stitch.
post #1279 of 1349
Gents,

Here is a "bucket bag", requested by my better half, that I finished up recently.

Made with Horween Essex leather (same tanning process as shell cordovan) . Lined, solid brass hardware.

Entirely stitched by hand, no machines used for any part of it.





First photo-First panel


Chris
post #1280 of 1349

very nice!

 

what are those fork/rake/chisel things i see at your bench? and what do you use for skiving?

 

sorry if i'm prying, just curious!

post #1281 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue collar View Post

Gents,

Here is a "bucket bag", requested by my better half, that I finished up recently.



Chris

Lovely work again. Careful or you'll start getting commissions smile.gif
post #1282 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post

very nice!

what are those fork/rake/chisel things i see at your bench? and what do you use for skiving?

sorry if i'm prying, just curious!

Thank you,

The "fork/rake'chisel" things are called Pricking Irons. They set the spacing of each stitch, 9 stitches per inch in this case. They are struck with a mallet and leave an impression in the leather. You then pass a sharp awl through the impression creating the hole that the thread will pass through.

As for skiving, it is done with the broad, flat blade (3rd tool to the right of the Pricking Irons).

Chris
post #1283 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofKent View Post

Lovely work again. Careful or you'll start getting commissions smile.gif

Thank you.

You know where to find me satisfied.gif
post #1284 of 1349
Your stitches are so neat! Great work again.
post #1285 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1000archa View Post


that duffle bag casually boshed out like it's nothing up the page left me absolutely speechless btw. 

Sorry for the delay, just say your comment now, thank you very much!
post #1286 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naka View Post

Your stitches are so neat! Great work again.

Thank you, Naka
post #1287 of 1349

How do you make the leather stiff enough to stitch with? I have seen some leather hides in leather supply stores and they are soft, as if they have been broken in already but without the wrinkles. I don't want that. I am looking for the stiff leather (like a board) like I have seen on the leather bags in high-end mens clothing stores.

post #1288 of 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ertu View Post

How do you make the leather stiff enough to stitch with? I have seen some leather hides in leather supply stores and they are soft, as if they have been broken in already but without the wrinkles. I don't want that. I am looking for the stiff leather (like a board) like I have seen on the leather bags in high-end mens clothing stores.

You'll want to use "natural veg tan" leather, saddle skirting, Latigo, or English Bridle if you are looking for very firm, stiff leather.

This is the kind of leather used in traditional english document cases and briefcases (and obviously saddles)

However, stiff leather is not suited for duffels, women's bags, pphone and tablet sleeves, etc.


That being said, It all depends on what you want to make.
post #1289 of 1349
Repainted my GATs after they got torn apart. 3 layers of gesso. Sanded in between each layer. 2 Layers of angelus direct white paint. Sanded. 2 More layers. Finished with the angelus acrylic finisher.

I wanted the sheen, so imo they turned out pretty good. Looks like patent leather.

mid first layer of gesso i think


after first layer of gesso


finished



The originals looked closer to the second picture in terms of paint thickness, but had more of a sheen that I haven't really seen on any of the DIY painted GATs I've seen. Mine go overboard on it, but I'm happy with the results.
Edited by blackderbyhat - 12/13/15 at 11:29pm
post #1290 of 1349

@kindofyoung I've been doing some shoulder alterations on some stuff recently, and I'm guessing you're not entirely unfamiliar with doing your own tailoring. I would say the trick is matching up the shape of the shoulder cut on the body vs the sleeves. 

 

It's difficult because if you make the body cut larger at the shoulder, it won't line up with the sides of the coat (the armpit will stick out relative to the shoulder), and if you trim away at the sleeve the original tapering might make it too small for the body hole. I'm not sure what the solution is, but I would def seek a pro tailor to help you out at first, or at least try it on something you're willing to throw out like a shirt.

 

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