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EG advise against Topy rubber soles - Page 3

post #31 of 129
Personally ,i do not normally listen to the purist gospel but in that case nearly every bottiers i have spoken to have advised me against putting topy's on the sole...
Being on night shift and looking for things to keep me awake ,i have even emailed some bottier in Paris and London to enlighten me on this important matter....The response: Niet on esthetics and also maintenance grounds...
I'm lucky enough or mad enough to have enough pairs to get around without wearing the same pair twice the same week but i have been advised to protect the trepointe with metal taps...
John Lobb is doing it for £30 a pair in Jermyn Street...
I do not recommend the local guy to havea go at it because the metal plate have to be screwed in by experienced saddlers..
post #32 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar
Personally ,i do not normally listen to the purist gospel but in that case nearly every bottiers i have spoken to have advised me against putting topy's on the sole...
Being on night shift and looking for things to keep me awake ,i have even emailed some bottier in Paris and London to enlighten me on this important matter....The response: Niet on esthetics and also maintenance grounds...
I'm lucky enough or mad enough to have enough pairs to get around without wearing the same pair twice the same week but i have been advised to protect the trepointe with metal taps...
John Lobb is doing it for £30 a pair in Jermyn Street...
I do not recommend the local guy to havea go at it because the metal plate have to be screwed in by experienced saddlers..

Did they have concrete reasons, or was it a "just because" type of answer? There is a lot of speculation that goes around in the world of clothing but precious little evidence to back it up. The point so many of us have already made (and remember, we have a lot of experience with worn shoes...some of us professionally), is that there are few if any negative effects we've seen or heard of from this treatment. That's more than has been offered by those who say this is bad for the shoes.
post #33 of 129
There was some discussion on this in another thread: http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=21505.
By the way, I do always put the rubber or plastic protectors on the shoes the first thing I do, before starting to use them. My shoe repair man recommended it (by the way, I should leave to office now, so that I can get by him and get my new Carminas with their brand new protectors, ready for use, before he closes...). I cannot think that the soles need to breathe a lot. They can breath through the inside of the shoe, I am sure that is enough. I have never had the feeling that my shoes get ruined for lack of breath.
post #34 of 129
I have a strong dislike for rubber soles, especially those added "protectors". The experience of wearing and walking is not the same. I've not yet met a serious cobbler who would recommend it (I'm extraordinarily surprised that Tony G would). The mediocre shoe repair shops would of course tell you to do so: it's good business for them.

I keep a few pairs of rubber sole shoes (1 JL, 1 EG, 1 SM) for the days of bad rain. I never wear them if it's not raining. I much prefer the feel of the leather sole
post #35 of 129
I had my cobbler topy a pair of C&J shooz and he failed. The rubber itself was too thick which just makes the Darlton even blobbier. I am thinking about topying shoes myself. Has anyone had any experience with this?
post #36 of 129
I suspect the real damage is not to the outsole but the insole. Moisture from the foot needs to be moved away from the foot...where bacteria flourish in moist conditions. Moisture will always move from wet to dry unless it hits a barrier like the Topy and then it stops moving and additional moisture just builds up as it has nowhere to go. Reading through these numerous and repeated discussions about whether to Topy or not to Topy, it seems particularly revealing that people who have an authentically high appreciation for good and better quality shoes always have their cheap shoes Topy'd but seldom, if ever, their EG's, G&G's, JL's, etc.. Of course many of those cheaper shoes...most perhaps...don't have a leather insole to begin with (leatherboard or fiberboard). So whether the moisture (and bacteria nurtured by that moisture) is wicked away from the foot tends to be moot. The shoes are probably not worth crying about, anyway, if the insoles go funky. I put Topy on my wife's shoes. But I monitor them constantly. and replace the shoes themselves on a frequent basis. Having said all that, although I would tend to discourage the use of Topy I don't consider it one of the seven deadly sins.
post #37 of 129
DWFII, what I don't understand then is why these exact same manufacturers are happy to make outsoles out of Dainite, Commanda, Gumlite, Crepe, etc... ...for the price, of course, of a custom order. It just doesn't add up.
post #38 of 129
Also whatever moisture issues would just be taken care of by a proper shoe tree, wouldn't it?
post #39 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesX View Post
Also whatever moisture issues would just be taken care of by a proper shoe tree, wouldn't it?
Which is another thing recommended often that I don't get wrt water issues (I understand its necessity for removing creases & maintaining shape) - which absorbs more water, a piece of wood or ... the atmosphere? As long as the relative humidity is low, which it is for all of us living in non-tropical areas, how can a piece of wood be better consistently over years?
post #40 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post
DWFII, what I don't understand then is why these exact same manufacturers are happy to make outsoles out of Dainite, Commanda, Gumlite, Crepe, etc... ...for the price, of course, of a custom order. It just doesn't add up.
Of course it doesn't. It's all marketing and...in one sense...exploitation. That said, it's the way of the world. Although you're right in what your remark implies--if you (as a maker/manufacturer) are honest and consistent...it's acceptable. If not, it's kind of hypocritical, isn't it? I have used plantation crepe (natural gum rubber) on occasion for shoes that, in my mind, at least, demanded it for styling reasons. But I would never say that it is the best choice for the shoe or the foot.
post #41 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesX View Post
Also whatever moisture issues would just be taken care of by a proper shoe tree, wouldn't it?
I'm not so sure. I suspect it depends on the density and the oiliness of the wood. Cedar is often touted and it is surely less dense than beech for instance but it is also oily and would effectively present a moisture barrier all by itself. Shoe trees are better at holding the leather in position and size while the leather is drying than actually wicking the moisture away. And to your implied question...yes, the ambient air within a shoe will wick moisture away from the surrounding leather faster than wood or other leathers...unless the ambient air is as moist or moreso than the leather itself. In that context, we need to remind ourselves that the shoe itself is a container of sorts and will retain moisture in place for some time.
post #42 of 129
What's most tiresome about the endless Topy debate is how inconclusive it is. This thread is five years old and yet remains mired in "might" and "could." As such, until someone presents concrete evidence, I will assume the difference is not worth worrying about.
post #43 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post
As long as the relative humidity is low, which it is for all of us living in non-tropical areas, how can a piece of wood be better consistently over years?
Even in the desert...unless you are severely dehydrated...your shoes become a tropical environment. And the more that wicking is restricted, such as in the case of athletic or running shoes, the more you see the effects of that tropical environment--athletes foot (a fungus) and other skin conditions all associated with moisture and heat.
post #44 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
What's most tiresome about the endless Topy debate is how inconclusive it is. This thread is five years old and yet remains mired in "might" and "could." As such, until someone presents concrete evidence, I will assume the difference is not worth worrying about.
All things being equal and disregarding the aesthetics, that's probably as good a position as any. Especially as it relates to the limited effect...for good or bad...of Topy.
post #45 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post
All things being equal and disregarding the aesthetics, that's probably as good a position as any. Especially as it related to the limited effect...for good or bad...of Topy.
i love listening to DWFII talk shoe care
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