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HOF: What Are You Wearing Right Now - Part III - Page 5139  

post #77071 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by gringodaddy View Post

no, and if you lived where I do you wouldn't either wink.gif

Shoot, I say that at the Capitol Hill in Washington, DC surrounded by cops so you have no excuse....:rimshot:

post #77072 of 78717

You've got it the wrong way around.  If holding a large black object in hand at arms length and saying "shoot" the cops are the ones to be concerned about.

post #77073 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by kulata View Post

@upr_crustDidn't make myself clear obviously (typing on blackberry). I meant this thread needs more variety. We need more posters like you. I like the way you standout and we need more people with distinct personal styles.

I understood the meaning of your first posting, and am complimented that you feel the way that you do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TM79 View Post

Funny you say that because for a long time I thought he was British. I can still imagine a very proper British accent and I think a New York accent would really throw me for a loop, especially if he sounded like a stereotypical Bronx cab driver you always see in movies and tv shows.

My accent is neither entirely proper British nor anything close to Bronx cabdriver. I grew up in suburban Boston, but have lost, over the years, most of my New England accent, or moderated it to a great degree.

A long time ago, a former co-worker once characterized my accent as "Eastern Seaboard Ruling Class". How accurate an estimation of my various vowels I cannot say, but I did think the phrase had some panache.

I've also been visiting the UK for some thirty years, and have had an appetite for "Masterpiece Theatre" since its inception, so my accent has acquired something of a transatlantic flavor - neither entirely US nor properly UK. A mongrel it is smile.gif.
post #77074 of 78717
Don, really like everything but the shoes-- I mean...that color leather, in that condition, and those laces? They seem like a solid choice for khakis or jeans, but not the superb suit/ good lookin FC shirt, and choice tie! Bro, how about some new footwear!?!? You really seem like a wholecut shoe kinda guy or a fellow who might buy some patina shoes and work the color and magic into them yourself by hand


post #77075 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJL View Post


I like the idea of this, but the tie's knit pattern is creating a kind of visual stripe that appears too close in scale to the shirt stripe. I think a tie with less textural "patterning" would work better here, possibly a fina grenadine, linen or shantung.

 

I've looked at the photos again and IRL and while I agree that the texture of the knit is forming a visual stripe, I don't see it fighting with the stripes of the shirt at all. Perhaps it is the boldness of the shirt stripes or the ease at which the texture resolves to solid as one moves away, but I don't get any mental aliasing, as it were. So while the letter of the law may have been violated, I think the spirit of the law is upheld. I do think a shantung would look good though, better even.

post #77076 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by upr_crust View Post

My accent is neither entirely proper British nor anything close to Bronx cabdriver. I grew up in suburban Boston, but have lost, over the years, most of my New England accent, or moderated it to a great degree.

A long time ago, a former co-worker once characterized my accent as "Eastern Seaboard Ruling Class". How accurate an estimation of my various vowels I cannot say, but I did think the phrase had some panache.

I've also been visiting the UK for some thirty years, and have had an appetite for "Masterpiece Theatre" since its inception, so my accent has acquired something of a transatlantic flavor - neither entirely US nor properly UK. A mongrel it is smile.gif.

 

That's very interesting. Do Brits/Americans treat you differently because of your accent?

 

As a non-native speaker, I used to have a predominantly American accent, the kind you hear on TV, but living in the UK has changed that into a bit of an awkward mix. It's neither fish nor fowl at the moment.

 

However, I've been working on acquiring a more defined transatlantic accent by practicing American Theater Standard, a codified Mid-Atlantic accent. I'm around Brits and Americans in my day-to-day life, both professionally and socially, so I figured it would make sense to have an accent that is somewhere in between. 

post #77077 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post
 

Nice look CS.  The graph check's not optimal but if u want a correct look the angle of your square is the more obvious error.  Angle up towards shoulder to echo the angle of the lapel.

@Pliny, I have taken your advice to heart and re-folded all of my pocket squares. How is this angle? I have tried to echo the angle of the pocket, rather than making a straight fold parallel to the earth's surface.

 

 
 

For reference: (Click to show)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by coldsalmon View Post
 

 

@kulata, on the subject of British style, today's tie was inspired by the very British Ian Richardson's Old Etonian tie:

He never wears a PS in House of Cards though.


Edited by coldsalmon - 5/5/14 at 1:36pm
post #77078 of 78717
I would appreciate (constructive) feedback on what folks thought didn't work about today's fit (other than that the shoes looked less than new old stock). I will kop to it being busy and pretty borderline, but I thought the colors and pattern variance made it gel. The collective clearly disagrees, and I'm OK with that. But I'm always interested to learn why.
post #77079 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

That's very interesting. Do Brits/Americans treat you differently because of your accent?

 

As a non-native speaker, I used to have a predominantly American accent, the kind you hear on TV, but living in the UK has changed that into a bit of an awkward mix. It's neither fish nor fowl at the moment.

 

However, I've been working on acquiring a more defined transatlantic accent by practicing American Theater Standard, a codified Mid-Atlantic accent. I'm around Brits and Americans in my day-to-day life, both professionally and socially, so I figured it would make sense to have an accent that is somewhere in between. 

 

Off Topic (Click to show)
Despite being an American citizen and having been living in the States for some 20 plus years (since age 11), I still freaking carry a hint of Korean accent. What really bothers me is when Koreans make fun of me when I speak Korean. 

Edited by Rudals - 5/5/14 at 2:00pm
post #77080 of 78717

G_MMcL:

 

It's three or four kinds of too much. Four patterns are too many. I don't love fancy stripe shirts, but I find they work well in two ways: the very casual or the very dressy (navy blazer or worsted suit). This is neither. Also, SF hates them, but SF hates a lotta stuff.

 

You've paired it with a pindot tie, which has too prominent a twill for the shirt's stripe, and though you're in the direction of a T&A/Thomas Pink English look, it's not bold enough to be a great example of the style (sorry to be a bit blunt -- I have a lot of respect for your style and your thrifting acumen).

 

That doesn't really make sense with the jacket, in terms of formality, and then in terms of pattern, the shirt/jacket/square don't quite work well.

 

I think it could have played well with a different shirt and tie. Also, I'm not sold on the trousers with that coat.

 

What idiom are you trying to dress in? Are you going for '60s Americana (plaid hopsack jacket, shell PTBs), something kind of "City of London," or something else entirely?

 

I know you mentioned being a bit worried that reading the coherent combinations thread would be not so great for your sense of style, but I think this is an example where more formal and stylistic coherence would be a good thing.

post #77081 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudals View Post
 

Despite being an American citizen and having been living in the States for some 20 plus years (since age 11), I still freaking carry a hint of Korean accent. What really bothers me is when Koreans make fun of me when I speak Korean. 

 

Korean history channel :foo:

post #77082 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post

That's very interesting. Do Brits/Americans treat you differently because of your accent?

As a non-native speaker, I used to have a predominantly American accent, the kind you hear on TV, but living in the UK has changed that into a bit of an awkward mix. It's neither fish nor fowl at the moment.

However, I've been working on acquiring a more defined transatlantic accent by practicing American Theater Standard, a codified Mid-Atlantic accent. I'm around Brits and Americans in my day-to-day life, both professionally and socially, so I figured it would make sense to have an accent that is somewhere in between. 

Interesting question, your first line. My accent tends to get posher when I'm in London, but that's my own neurosis, though speaking more in a posher accent of the locals does tend to improve their comprehension of me (and if it assists in the eternal unspoken class warfare that passes for social interchange in the UK, so be it).

In New York, there are so many accents from so many places (many of them imaginary) that my accent does not stand out terribly much, and I live with a Brit, who finds my accent much less harsh than most American accents (certainly those native to the Five Boroughs).
post #77083 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudals View Post
 

Despite being an American citizen and having been living in the States for some 20 plus years (since age 11), I still freaking carry a hint of Korean accent. What really bothers me is when Koreans make fun of me when I speak Korean. 

Spoiler because off topic (Click to show)

I suppose some people pick up accents faster than others? It has mostly been subconscious for me, for example, I caught myself speaking in a Canadian accent after hanging out with Canadians for a couple of days.

 

That's why I thought it'd be nice to take charge of the whole process and decide for myself what kind of accent I'd like to have. That's the one advantage of being a non-native speaker, no matte what accent you have, it can't really be fake or disingenuous.

 

You could always try a speech pathologist if you really want to get rid of your accent, but I'd say every kind of accent is equally valid, and it's certainly nothing to be ashamed of. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by upr_crust View Post


Interesting question, your first line. My accent tends to get posher when I'm in London, but that's my own neurosis, though speaking more in a posher accent of the locals does tend to improve their comprehension of me (and if it assists in the eternal unspoken class warfare that passes for social interchange in the UK, so be it).

In New York, there are so many accents from so many places (many of them imaginary) that my accent does not stand out terribly much, and I live with a Brit, who finds my accent much less harsh than most American accents (certainly those native to the Five Boroughs).
 
Thank you for your reply, it is much appreciated! It's a very relevant topic for me at the moment.
post #77084 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldsalmon View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
@Pliny
, I have taken your advice to heart and re-folded all of my pocket squares. How is this angle? I have tried to echo the angle of the pocket, rather than making a straight fold parallel to the earth's surface.





 

  For reference: (Click to show)

@kulata
, on the subject of British style, today's tie was inspired by the very British Ian Richardson's Old Etonian tie:


He never wears a PS in House of Cards though.

Swap your suit with this Henry Poole and you are gold
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
henry-poole-bespoke-suit-grooming-foxhunt-jd5.jpg

Same tie with a Turnbull and Asser suit

ab-jaunty-001-073.jpg?w=496&h=330
Edited by kulata - 5/5/14 at 2:08pm
post #77085 of 78717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post
  Spoiler because off topic (Click to show)

I suppose some people pick up accents faster than others? It has mostly been subconscious for me, for example, I caught myself speaking in a Canadian accent after hanging out with Canadians for a couple of days.

 

That's why I thought it'd be nice to take charge of the whole process and decide for myself what kind of accent I'd like to have. That's the one advantage of being a non-native speaker, no matte what accent you have, it can't really be fake or disingenuous.

 

You could always try a speech pathologist if you really want to get rid of your accent, but I'd say every kind of accent is equally valid, and it's certainly nothing to be ashamed of. 

Off the Topic Conversation (Click to show)

The accent is very very very slight and most people do not notice it so going to see a speech doctor would be an overkill. 

You're right in that it is nothing to be ashamed of. I like it 'cus it says something about me, of which I am proud of. 

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