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healthy breakfast? - Page 4

post #46 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. White View Post
Hate to be the first to tell you. Your body can take up a lot of amino acid. But it won't convert more than about 45-55 g of that into proteins. The rest gets burned for fuel. Since amino acids contain nitrogen, they burn hotter than carbos or fats. Which means, eating more proteins vs. carbos just makes you hotter after a meal. And wastes money. And overloads you with fats and sterols (which are usually found along with naturally-occurring proteins).

If that was true intermittent fasting wouldn't work as they'd only be getting 55g of protein a day and they'd be weak as fuck. Sorry, but I don't believe that at all. Its not like we're naturally designed to eat every few hours.

Yeah, I'm a student, I workout about 2 hours a day and I'm trying to gain weight so I do need the calories.
post #47 of 76
I work out in the morning, so after I get back I put a banana, a few strawberries or blueberries, some skim milk and a scoop of whey protein powder in a blender and let her rip. Comes out to about 300 calories and about 35 grams of protein. Not too shabby.

I usually have a protein bar around mid morning.
post #48 of 76
not sure if anyone has done this before but eating 'breakfast' the night before?


soemtimes when i know im going to be doing something rigorous in the morning at work and forsee i wont have any time to stop to eat anything, i will eat something at night before right before bed. something high in starch and carbohydrates.


last night i ate a big bowl of mixed rice right before bed.
post #49 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuji View Post
If that was true intermittent fasting wouldn't work as they'd only be getting 55g of protein a day and they'd be weak as fuck. Sorry, but I don't believe that at all. Its not like we're naturally designed to eat every few hours.

Your body manufactures proteins out of amino acids in order to repair itself. Your body has a finite ability to perform repairs. That's why you can't eat a pound of protein, work out, and gain a pound of muscle.

Proteins that you eat are broken down into amino acids by digestion. Your body won't waste energy. Only as much amino acids are converted into proteins as your body needs and can use. As I said, that's about 50 grams a day.

Any excess amino acids that are taken up -- are burned as fuel.

During fasts, your body burns fat as its backup source of fuel. That's why it's a bad idea for men to strive to be less than about 7% fat. When you're under 5% fat, you get noticeably weaker during exercise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sho'nuff View Post
not sure if anyone has done this before but eating 'breakfast' the night before?


soemtimes when i know im going to be doing something rigorous in the morning at work and forsee i wont have any time to stop to eat anything, i will eat something at night before right before bed. something high in starch and carbohydrates.


last night i ate a big bowl of mixed rice right before bed.

Runners do this all the time. It's called "carbo loading." Aerobic exercise makes your body very efficient at draining sugar from your muscles and replenishing them after a meal. To be stronger for a race, runners eat big meals of pasta the night before.
post #50 of 76
^^ That makes no evolutionary sense. From your claims in the "population control" thread, its pretty clear you are some kind of paleo-anarchist/anarcho-primativist. Which is fine but all of those people "know" that the original human diet was mostly fat and protein And lastly No one got huge off of 50 grams of protein a day. I mean, even he who shalt not be named recommended 70, and he was laughed off of this board.
post #51 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajak View Post
...

Dude, have to get that rollin' 70-120.
post #52 of 76
100% whey protein powder mixed with blended fruit and vegetables.
post #53 of 76
Today was greek yogurt and cinnamon, but I needed more protien. I'm trying to stick with 4 eggs.
post #54 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajak View Post
...the original human diet was mostly fat and protein.

Human dentition, jaws, and digits/claws indicate a diet of mostly fruit with some seeds. We'll eat anything we can catch. But chimps, gorillas, and other primates manufacture their own ascorbic acid. We can't. Obviously our nurturing proto-environment, the formerly-lush Rift Valley, was so respendant with fruit that we lost the ability to make vitamin C.
post #55 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. White View Post
Human dentition, jaws, and digits/claws indicate a diet of mostly fruit with some seeds. We'll eat anything we can catch. But chimps, gorillas, and other primates manufacture their own ascorbic acid. We can't. Obviously our nurturing proto-environment, the formerly-lush Rift Valley, was so respendant with fruit that we lost the ability to make vitamin C.

Actually the loss of the ability to produce vitamin C is a relatively primitive trait shared by all haplorrhini and is not a trait unique to Homo sapiens.
post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. White View Post
Human dentition, jaws, and digits/claws indicate a diet of mostly fruit with some seeds. We'll eat anything we can catch. But chimps, gorillas, and other primates manufacture their own ascorbic acid. We can't. Obviously our nurturing proto-environment, the formerly-lush Rift Valley, was so respendant with fruit that we lost the ability to make vitamin C.


Our lack of a second stomach/excessively long digestive tract indicates a preference for meat and some veggies. Our tool making abilities allowed us to basically hate the woolly mammoths into extinction (Lewis 2011). The Inuit manage not to get scurvy with a all meat diet. Liver contains vitamin C. We have canines, like other meat eaters. We are onmivores.

Plus there is no evidence to support the 50g/day claim (unless you're calculating "well, you can only grow 1000g of muscle a month at max, so per day thats around 50g... which isn't how it works)
post #57 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waistcoat View Post
If you don't want to cook, boil a couple of eggs the night before and peel them, straight down the hatchet in the morning. Piece of fruit and you're good to go.

This.
post #58 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradstudent78 View Post
Actually the loss of the ability to produce vitamin C is a relatively primitive trait shared by all haplorrhini and is not a trait unique to Homo sapiens.

Interesting that you call it "primitive." Sort of like sweating. Among mammals other than humans, horses and hippos sweat profusely, and they're fairly primitive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajak View Post
Our lack of a second stomach/excessively long digestive tract indicates a preference for meat and some veggies. Our tool making abilities allowed us to basically hate the woolly mammoths into extinction (Lewis 2011). The Inuit manage not to get scurvy with a all meat diet. Liver contains vitamin C. We have canines, like other meat eaters. We are onmivores.

Plus there is no evidence to support the 50g/day claim (unless you're calculating "well, you can only grow 1000g of muscle a month at max, so per day thats around 50g... which isn't how it works)

We manufacture all the cholesterol we need. Any that we eat -- the body doesn't know what to do with it, and dumps it into the blood stream to stick to arteries. Using our naked bodies, it's easy to catch and eat white-meat frogs, snakes, crabs, &c, but it's almost impossible to bring down a red-meat grazer and bite through its hide. Living in cold Canada or Siberia and hunting wooly mammoths were cultural adaptations -- not inherent abilities.

I got the 45-55 number from a thick UN report that I read about 25 years ago in the reference section of a library. It's pretty sensible. If your body's injured very slightly, it will repair itself in a few days. If your body is badly injured, healing takes longer. Clearly, the body can do only so much repair per day. Building muscle tissue is a form of repair.
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. White View Post
Interesting that you call it "primitive." Sort of like sweating. Among mammals other than humans, horses and hippos sweat profusely, and they're fairly primitive.

Actually, sweating (at least in the sense that it's used for thermoregulation and that we have a large number of sweat glands) would be considered a derived trait (and not primitive) at least in humans. I'm not sure how it would be viewed in terms of horse or hippo evolution.

I'm using it in the technical sense (as used by evolutionary biologist), as defined here:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/ch...ly/page04.html
Quote:
Organisms have only two types of traits: primitive and derived. Primitive traits are those inherited from distant ancestors. Derived traits are those that just appeared (by mutation) in the most recent ancestor -- the one that gave rise to a newly formed branch. Of course, what's primitive or derived is relative to what branch an organism is on.
post #60 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. White View Post
We manufacture all the cholesterol we need. Any that we eat -- the body doesn't know what to do with it, and dumps it into the blood stream to stick to arteries. Using our naked bodies, it's easy to catch and eat white-meat frogs, snakes, crabs, &c, but it's almost impossible to bring down a red-meat grazer and bite through its hide. Living in cold Canada or Siberia and hunting wooly mammoths were cultural adaptations -- not inherent abilities.
You're half right. We do manufacture the cholesterol in our blood. Any we eat is broken down. There is no link between dietary and blood cholesterol. 27 studies support this. Edit: We've been using tools since 2.5Ma. We've been hunting large game since 1.8Ma, ie: before we were homo sapiens. We were barely in the genus homo when we started eating big game. In fact, H.S. only appeared 200kA, so we've been hunting large game for something like 9 times as long as we've been "humans". To say that large game unnatural because we couldn't catch it naked implies that chimps shouldn't eat ants because they use a stick to get them out of an anthole. Also see more examples on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tool_use_by_animals. It's completely irrelevant to say what humans should or shouldn't do based off of naked/no tool abilities, since we've been using tools 12x as long as we've been a species. Edit 2: A UN report was probably based around preventing malnutrition, not what is optimal for a good body comp, nor what is at all useful to someone trying to beef up.
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