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Why tailors on the row love so much heavier fabrics? - Page 3

post #31 of 54
las,

which book did you use for your suit with cifo?
post #32 of 54
I do agree with those who say 11 oz is the sweet spot for tailoring. Ive heard more than one bespoke tailor tell me similar.

With that in mind, I dont think I'll be getting many more bespoke suits under 10oz in the future. For one, the heavier cloth wears longer. For two, I live in NYC. I dont care what weight the fabric is, you're going to sweat like a pig in a NY subway during the summer wearing anything other than shorts and a t-shirt. Id rather not do that in a $5000 bespoke suit. Even futher, most RTW suits now a days seem to be well under 10oz, so there are many more options for lighter weight suits than for heavier weight suits.

I'll save my bespoke dollars for harder to find heavier weights that will look better and last longer.
post #33 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post
las,

which book did you use for your suit with cifo?

I have used some of the roll on the atelier shelves at Rue Marbeuf...

It is a Drapers 11 oz solid navy with a very faint pinstripes.
post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Personally, I think 11 oz is the sweet spot.

For flannel or in general?
post #35 of 54
Thread Starter 
It will be great to have another great fabrics threads where we could share our personal fabric experiences..

We don't hear enough of the smaller mills.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
For flannel or in general?

11 oz for worsteds. 14 oz is the sweet spot for Flannel. Any lighter than that and it becomes flimsy and too delicate.
post #37 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt S View Post
11 oz for worsteds. 14 oz is the sweet spot for Flannel. Any lighter than that and it becomes flimsy and too delicate.

For worsted , 11 or 12 oz are great...

The texture is important too.

For woolen flannel , 13/14 oz ...
post #38 of 54
also saw a few nice things in the smith woollens goldsmith book. it is 10/11 (320 grams), super120s.
post #39 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post
also saw a few nice things in the smith woollens goldsmith book. it is 10/11 (320 grams), super120s.

Fine classics and Oyster are not bad at all too.

I will have a better look at the Botany book too.
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbarView Post
My last suit was from Cifonelli and it was a 11/12 oz.

When I went to Huntsman with a sample of Fox worsted flannel 330 grm/11 oz , David Ward advised me it was too loght for a great 3 piece suit...

As I also like the Premier Cru book , am I right to insist having lighter fabrics or go for the Smiths Book?

lasbar,

smiths has a 10/11 book - blue riband. i'm going to use it for my order with cifo.

i just looked at it side-by-side with the premier cru book yesterday and the smiths seemed just a touch more robust (the harrisons was slightly lighter and softer in feel), but just a nice. also, at the next weight class i compared the smiths botany to the harrisons fine classics and preferred the smiths there as well.

some photos at the link of a 3 piece suit in smiths blue riband (click to zoom): http://executive.at.webry.info/200811/article_1.html

i don't have any garments from either smiths or harrisons so this is just my noob opinion fwiw...

Kuro,

Is the suit in the picture yours? Are you happy with the Blue Riband?
post #41 of 54
Maybe it's my imagination, but weight doesn't necessarily correlate with insulation.

My first 'proper' bespoke suit was a 2 piece SB in charcoal herringbone tweed at about 15-16 oz. It wears very comfortably below about 15 deg C (60 farenheit?) so I wear it about 2/3 of the year. Most of my other suits, including a dinner jacket (tuxedo), are 11oz or more.

I have 1 'summer suit' in 8oz. It looks ok when standing still, but on the move, the trousers wrap around my legs and the coat seems to lack substnce. The Tube is unpleasant in hot weather whatever you're wearing, only a linen shirt helps any: no lightness of fabric would make it bearable.
post #42 of 54
I find that sweat comes on often with any fabric over 10 oz. Hot blooded! Wish I could wear heavier fabrics because they are dignified and elegant.

Would any of you share your wisdom on my thread about fine/soft fabrics? Looking for a cashmere or fine worsted wool for a solid grey sport coat. I haven't ventured into fabric makers very much.

http://www.styleforum.net/forum/thread/258691/favorite-cashmere-or-super-150-for-sportcoat
post #43 of 54
Easier to work with, generally less expensive so good for margin, its what they are used to. I like around 10 oz myself 12 max unless its a tweed.
post #44 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Easier to work with, generally less expensive so good for margin, its what they are used to. I like around 10 oz myself 12 max unless its a tweed.

They always push for heavier fabrics for the reason stipulated above...

They love Lesser too because they have a great a discount with them.
post #45 of 54
At the risk of repeating what others have said, very probably more cogently:

All things being equal, I think it is fair to state that:
- a loosely woven cloth will wear cooler than a tightly woven one.
- a cloth with a nap will wear warmer than a “dry” cloth (e.g., a flannel v. a worsted)
- a cloth with a “dry hand” will last longer than a soft cloth (a worsted v. a flannel).

To stay cool in summer: do not run, do not walk in the sun, do not take public transportation, do not carry heavy packages. A lighter colour feels cooler, but that may be my imagination.

I do not own a suit from cloth weighing less than 12/13 oz. (a mid-grey worsted from Smith Woollens, ref. 3901, in a fairly porous weave). I am not sure I could follow this “rule” if I lived in the US. All of my other suits are 13.oz. and up, many in the 16 oz. range and above.

I don’t think my current tailors (Meyer & “Mortimer/Jones Chalk & Dawson) ever "pushed” me towards heavier cloths. I naturally start looking through the heavier ranges first (Lesser, Dugdale, Smith Woollens, John G. Hardy or P & H for tweeds). Too bad the books seem thinner and thinner as the years go by.

Frog in Suit
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