or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Which wholecut brouge should I get?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Which wholecut brouge should I get?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm torn between these two wholecuts: Italigente and the Cheaney MacDonald. What do you say SF, which one should i get?

Cheaney

Italigente


Right now I can't afford c&j weymouths or eg newbury's, and these seem like good alternatives. I like the Italigentes a lot, but don't know much about them. Search function only brought up one old thread. A really sharp looking shoe with a lot of promise. The Cheaney is quite reasonably priced and will be a bit easier on the pocket. What do you guys think. Besides the whole blake/rapid construction debate (not sold that blake/rapid is worse) what do you think of the quality of these two? Opinions on what to invest in?
post #2 of 19
Italigente brouging detail is sick, but I'm not feeling the boxy front. I prefer the rounder toe of the Cheaney. Sorry I'm no help...
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marg View Post
Italigente brouging detail is sick, but I'm not feeling the boxy front.

Although I think I also prefer the toe on the Cheaney, I wouldn't describe the others as 'boxy' either. They both look nice in their own ways, though I've never heard of Italigente whereas Cheaney are well known, so I'm not sure what kind of quality you're getting with the former?
post #4 of 19
I prefer the last and brouging on the Italigente, though I am unfamiliar with their quality.
post #5 of 19
none of those are brogued

in fact, by definition, a wholecut can never be brogued
post #6 of 19
sorry, i thought that term could also be used for referring to the medallion detailing on the toe. isn't that why they call a captoe with detailing on the front a semi-brogue?
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trompe le Monde View Post
none of those are brogued

in fact, by definition, a wholecut can never be brogued

What are you talking about? Brogue = decorative perforations.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marg View Post
Italigente brouging detail is sick, but I'm not feeling the boxy front. I prefer the rounder toe of the Cheaney. Sorry I'm no help...

To add to the "no help" column, I actually prefer the "boxy front" of the Italigente and the medallion of the Cheaney. So, now you have conflicting opinions, neither of which helps.

My personal opinion is that wholecuts tend to look a bit blobby due to the lack of visual breaks. As such, I think the "boxy front" is better suited for the wholecut than a more rounded toe.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yeah...demi-brogue...medallion...punch toe. All the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aldehyde View Post
I prefer the last and brouging on the Italigente, though I am unfamiliar with their quality.

Agree with ya Aldehyde, the Italigente medallion is looking nice and elegant to me. I'm leaning towards them, but just unfamiliar with their quality. Was hoping someone on this forum had a pair. I'm fine with Italigente's blake/rapid construction (the debate continues), but I just want to make sure that the rest of the quality is good for the price. Price-wise the Italigente come out to be in the mid five hundred and the Cheaney's are about mid three hundred. So if I sprung for the Italigente's want to make sure its worth the extra.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aldehyde View Post
What are you talking about? Brogue = decorative perforations.

brogue is when the shoe is made of overlapping pieces of leather. often, that overlapped edge is both serrated and punched.

the toe decoration alone is a (punched) medallion




this is a brogued, punched, serrated, medallioned blucher
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marg View Post
sorry, i thought that term could also be used for referring to the medallion detailing on the toe. isn't that why they call a captoe with detailing on the front a semi-brogue?

a full brogue will have curved toe-cap broguing (i.e. into wings)
a semi brogue (or half brogue) has a straight toe-cap WITH medallion
a quarter brogue has a straight toe-cap WITHOUT medallion (example below)

post #12 of 19
Yes there are the 4 types of brouge shoes, but I've often seen decorative punching described as brougeing.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aldehyde View Post
Yes there are the 4 types of brouge shoes, but I've often seen decorative punching described as brougeing.

Yes, any kind of punched holes are technically 'broguing', yet a whole-cut with a medallion is still not something I would describe as 'a brogue'.
post #14 of 19

Venezia II

I just bought a pair of Italigente Venezia II. I will be happy to get back to you guys when I've got a better feeling of the shoe, both construction and leather. I will of course post a picture of the shoes when aged for a while. Judging from the people behind this company and the factory used, I believe this brand may have more to offer than one might believe at first. If however, proven to be of insufficient quality, I won't be afraid of posting it here.

post #15 of 19

They look very good I think. I've one pair of Italigente Stoccolma which is a chelsea boot and I'm very happy so far with my buy. I bought them during a sale for half the original prize so I'm satisfied.

 

I'm not sure if Italigente are worth the prize of 390 euro, but I'm sure they're atleast as good quality-wise as Loake 1880 and in my eyes they're looking far better. 

 

I hope you will become satisfied with your buy Lano.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Which wholecut brouge should I get?