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Grad School Thread

post #1 of 260
Thread Starter 
Since I made my decision, gonna convert this thread to a general one.
post #2 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
But the loans would be crushing, even if I could beg, borrow and steal.

Still, you'd have an MA in English.

Personally, I'd go for the History program, but I'm biased there.
post #3 of 260
You want to take out loans for an MA in english/history? barf.
post #4 of 260
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
Still, you'd have an MA in English.

Personally, I'd go for the History program, but I'm biased there.

Do you have an MA in History? I'm definitely considering that program, but I haven't heard back yet and I don't want to count my chickens before they've hatched.

Regardless of where I go I plan on pursuing a PhD.
post #5 of 260
lol
post #6 of 260
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugger View Post
You want to take out loans for an MA in english/history? barf.

I don't have an issue taking $3,000/year in loans. I do have an issue taking $35,000/year in loans.

But School A is the type of name that really, really opens doors. And it's my dream school.

But.. as you said... the loans.
post #7 of 260
Go with the one that puts you in deeper debt.
post #8 of 260
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Go with the one that puts you in deeper debt.

aww stephenhero, I know you love me.
post #9 of 260
I'm serious. It shows how much you care about your education.
post #10 of 260
When I was applying to grad school, I was looking at MA programs in political science. One of the professors who helped me out a lot told me never to attend a grad school without funding, particularly in a non-professional/terminal degree program. I effectively ended up taking his advice, given I was funded the whole time, but, even if I hadn't been funded, I probably would have gone anyway. In retrospect, however, he was 100% right, and I was lucky to have avoided learning that the hard way. It's just not worth ending up with a ton of debt, especially for an MA in something like English.

My advice to you is to take the second offer, rock it for two years, and step up a notch when the time comes to get your PhD. I know a couple of people who did this. They started in middling-to-decent MA programs, but they were among the best students in their program. When the time came to move on to a PhD program, they wound up in outstanding programs (one in the second-best program in the country for her specialization). Doing this would allow you to get the degree that counts (the PhD) from a great school, but you wouldn't have to worry about the ridiculous debt load that comes with option number one.
post #11 of 260
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrG View Post
When I was applying to grad school, I was looking at MA programs in political science. One of the professors who helped me out a lot told me never to attend a grad school without funding, particularly in a non-professional/terminal degree program. I effectively ended up taking his advice, given I was funded the whole time, but, even if I hadn't been funded, I probably would have gone anyway. In retrospect, however, he was 100% right, and I was lucky to have avoided learning that the hard way. It's just not worth ending up with a ton of debt, especially for an MA in something like English.

My advice to you is to take the second offer, rock it for two years, and step up a notch when the time comes to get your PhD. I know a couple of people who did this. They started in middling MA programs, but they were among the best students in their program. When the time came to move on to a PhD program, they wound up in outstanding programs (one in the second-best program in the country for her specialization). Doing this would allow you to get the degree that countys (the PhD) from a great school, but you wouldn't have to worry about the ridiculous debt load that comes with option number one.

My thinking is definitely along these lines -- and I know the second choice is a good enough program that it would allow such a transition (especially with the teaching experience it comes with), but still, dream school
post #12 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
Do you have an MA in History?
No, but every time I daydream about getting my spare time more organized, that's the sort of thing that pops up.
post #13 of 260
$35,000 a year debt .. to study English? What doors would it open that would make it even possible to pay off that debt? Assuming a 2 year program MA program .. you'll have $70,000+ in debt, and an English MA. I don't see how it would be possible to ever pay off that debt.
post #14 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by imschatz View Post
? What doors would it open?

The door to her heart.

post #15 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
My thinking is definitely along these lines -- and I know the second choice is a good enough program that it would allow such a transition (especially with the teaching experience it comes with), but still, dream school

Yeah, the dream school part sucks. I went through something similar, so I'm sympathetic.

Look at it this way: The dream school will look a lot less dreamy through $70,000 in loans plus interest. Plus, if you're good enough to get into the MA without funding, you should be good enough to get into the PhD program fully funded after you spend the next two years killin' it in your second-choice MA program.
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