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Delicious Wines - Page 4

post #46 of 246
I hit up Trader Joes for my cheap, yet pleasureable wines. I've found the Rendition Zin is an all-time favorite (7.99 iirc) and the TJ's branded Reserve Cab/Pinto for 12.99 are also winners in the taste department. My only contention with cheaper good tasting wines is that I find many of them are like the McD of the wine world - over-jammy, over-alcoholed, and over-oaked. It's a recipe that nearly anyone will like, and can mask generally low quality grapes/processes. Nevertheless, I like it like I like a Big Mac.
post #47 of 246
Going to have to jump on the bandwagon for Cru Bojo as well. I think with the '09s alone, I have probably had around 20 this year. Most of the repeats in the lineup include names like Burgaud, Lapierre, Bouland, JP Brun, and Foillard. Favorite right now is the JP Brun Morgon with the Lapierre as a close second. Both will be interesting in a few years to see how they develop. I have half a case of the Burgaud Cote du Py waiting for me to pick up this weekend especially since buying it at 12 bucks each. Still trying to track down Thevenet though and some more examples of Fleurie.
post #48 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
Yes- especially given how those wines are served, the atmosphere and the lack of food pairing, frankly, as I tend to be on the side of "it's how it pairs with food that matters". I've yet to open and enjoy a bottle with no accompaniment. <- which is probably an interesting threak unto its own.
I find that certain wines, particularly those with more residual sugar are more enjoyable either pre or post food, the flavor profile is actually counter-productive with whatever I am eating. However, my most favorite wines are definitely those that pair with food to enhance the overall experience (1 + 1 = 3).
post #49 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post
Going to have to jump on the bandwagon for Cru Bojo as well. I think with the '09s alone, I have probably had around 20 this year. Most of the repeats in the lineup include names like Burgaud, Lapierre, Bouland, JP Brun, and Foillard. Favorite right now is the JP Brun Morgon with the Lapierre as a close second. Both will be interesting in a few years to see how they develop. I have half a case of the Burgaud Cote du Py waiting for me to pick up this weekend especially since buying it at 12 bucks each. Still trying to track down Thevenet though and some more examples of Fleurie.

Many of those will last, so don't drink too quickly. I'm still going through some of the high-test 2003s and they're not fading at all.
post #50 of 246
I don't think anyone has mentioned Gruner Veltliner yet. I've had several very tasty examples of this in the last year. Also, Viognier, both New and Old , can be very delcious and easy to drink.
post #51 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
Many of those will last, so don't drink too quickly. I'm still going through some of the high-test 2003s and they're not fading at all.

Good to know the 03 are holding up well. Was at Bouchon on Sunday night and they had an 08 Lapierre as special, but was by myself and couldn't bear to drink a whole bottle after being in LV for close to 4 days already. Did have a delicious glass of 04 Marbuzet (st estephe), which was still on its way up.
post #52 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I don't think anyone has mentioned Gruner Veltliner yet. I've had several very tasty examples of this in the last year. Also, Viognier, both New and Old , can be very delcious and easy to drink.

i'd agree with gv ... it reminds me a lot of albarino in some ways. viognier can be a very particular wine, though, at least in traditional style. it has a very heavy, almost syrupy flavor profile, but a surprisingly light texture and, when well-made, good acidity. delicious, but tricky.
post #53 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I don't think anyone has mentioned Gruner Veltliner yet. I've had several very tasty examples of this in the last year. Also, Viognier, both New and Old , can be very delcious and easy to drink.

I generally agree with both- but I was trying to narrow this down to Matt's point of "always brings a smile" versus "I generally always like this wine". Though both of these come close.
post #54 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
I love the alsatian-style whites from Navarro in the Anderson Valley, and it seems that no matter who i pour them for, they do to.

I drank two bottles recently that I picked up at the winery a few years ago. It was just a happy coincidence of a day trip we took from a week spent in Sea Ranch, and it was just happenstance that we stopped at Navarro (I think it was one of the prettier vineyards). I didn't know anything about the winery but I really enjoyed those bottles.
post #55 of 246
Thread Starter 
Sea Ranch is so awesome. We recently went to the Alsatian wine festival in Anderson Valley. The Navarro was good, and I generally like their whites a lot. Unfortunately for all of the growers, the French maker they invited, Weinbach, poured eight of the best Alsatians I've tasted. Some good stuff from the Finger Lakes there too.
post #56 of 246
i'm a big believer. they've got a great business plan ... something like 80-85% of sales are through the tasting room or mail-order. they only have a few restaurant clients, most notably chez panisse. they deal mostly with the same vineyards they've been using for years and they're completely privately held. even better -- if you're a socialist like me -- all of their workers get healthcare. oh, and the wines taste great.
post #57 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Some good stuff from the Finger Lakes there too.

Nice. But I'm biased.
post #58 of 246
I always enjoy Provencal reds. Clos Chanteduc is a nice one I've liked a lot lately. Kinda juicy and herbal. Outside of a few special bottles, most of my stash is just "fun wine" (and usually under 20 bucks).
post #59 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
Yes- especially given how those wines are served, the atmosphere and the lack of food pairing, frankly, as I tend to be on the side of "it's how it pairs with food that matters". I've yet to open and enjoy a bottle with no accompaniment. <- which is probably an interesting threak unto its own.

Yes, this is incredibly important. There are plenty of wines that are wonderful on their own that I drink, but in my opinion, wine is made for the table. In a very general way of speaking, and we should always avoid generalities, I think French & Italian wines are made for the table, whereas it seems Californian wines are more often made with the thought of some wine connoisseur sitting in his lounge chair in his study drinking it alone.
post #60 of 246
So far, lots of lighter body varieties...

For something heavier, I like Nero d'Avola from Sicily. It is syrah grape, but also goes well with casual food that might overpower all the lighter types. In EU they are only about 5~20 euros, but the quality of the wines are sometimes 10 times the price. I am sure they would cost more in the U.S., but still I bet they are extremely good value.
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