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Delicious Wines - Page 12

post #166 of 246
Thanks again Gomestar. This was fantastic! I got it at a place that was known to be on the pricey side, it was $16.50 so I am guessing I could have copped it for about $2 or $3 less elsewhere.

post #167 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?

The term can mean differnt things to people because Rhone has numerous flavor profiles (Chateauneuf tasting very different than Cote Rotie)

But generally, I think these are the flavor profiles ones thinks of in traditional rhone style wines:
earth, spicy red fruit, pepper, game. A lot of people use rhone style now to describe the grapes they include in the blend. And some people even use it to describe a wine making style - higher acid, lower alcohol etc... to distinguish between syrah, grenache, mouvedre grapes that can taste so different depending on the region grown.

California is better known for syrah, grenache wines that are rich, ripe and fruit driven. The term rhone style blend is sometimes used here to describe a wine that will taste a little less like a typical California syrah/grenache based wine.
post #168 of 246
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Thanks again Gomestar. This was fantastic! I got it at a place that was known to be on the pricey side, it was $16.50 so I am guessing I could have copped it for about $2 or $3 less elsewhere.

Both the Cypress and Sunflower cuvees are generally very good, especially for the price. No idea on what a Rhone blend is supposed to mean. Well, I suppose I know what it means, but I've never tasted a Rhone blend out of Napa that even hinted at the Rhone. Not that there aren't good ones, though.
post #169 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Both the Cypress and Sunflower cuvees are generally very good, especially for the price.

No idea on what a Rhone blend is supposed to mean. Well, I suppose I know what it means, but I've never tasted a Rhone blend out of Napa that even hinted at the Rhone. Not that there aren't good ones, though.

Based on this back of this label this isn't from napa, it is from the Rhone, just "blended" by Lynch. Does that make any sense? That is why perhaps it is marketed as a Cote de Rhone. Regardless, I thought it was great and I might pick up a case. They said that I can get 15% off for a case, do you think that is still too high?
post #170 of 246
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Based on this back of this label this isn't from napa, it is from the Rhone, just "blended" by Lynch. Does that make any sense? That is why perhaps it is marketed as a Cote de Rhone. Regardless, I thought it was great and I might pick up a case. They said that I can get 15% off for a case, do you think that is still too high?
It is definitely from the Rhone. I was just responding to two questions at the same time. I don't remember the price in his store, but it is good wine for the price up to about $20, imo.
post #171 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
It is definitely from the Rhone. I was just responding to two questions at the same time. I don't remember the price in his store, but it is good wine for the price up to about $20, imo.

Ah, ok. Thanks for the info and insight.
post #172 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by guster View Post
The term can mean differnt things to people because Rhone has numerous flavor profiles (Chateauneuf tasting very different than Cote Rotie)

But generally, I think these are the flavor profiles ones thinks of in traditional rhone style wines:
earth, spicy red fruit, pepper, game. A lot of people use rhone style now to describe the grapes they include in the blend. And some people even use it to describe a wine making style - higher acid, lower alcohol etc... to distinguish between syrah, grenache, mouvedre grapes that can taste so different depending on the region grown.

California is better known for syrah, grenache wines that are rich, ripe and fruit driven. The term rhone style blend is sometimes used here to describe a wine that will taste a little less like a typical California syrah/grenache based wine.

Not trying to be snarky but I have no idea what any of this really means and I feel I should.
post #173 of 246
I forgot how good of a selection Chambers Street Wines has. Until today. Well worth a visit.
post #174 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Not trying to be snarky but I have no idea what any of this really means and I feel I should.

No worries, I was rushing though the email and I am sure I did not write clearly.

I was trying to express that I hear people use "Rhone blend Style" in various ways. There does not seem to be a consistency in which the phrase is used. I was then trying to explain a few examples including:

- I hear it used as a flavor profile descriptor.

- Hear it used to describe a wine makeing style, much like "old world" vs "new world" winemaking styles.

- Hear it used to describe a syrah, grenache mouvedre wine from California that someone considers atypical to the normal California flavor profile for these grapes.
post #175 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
but I've never tasted a Rhone blend out of Napa that even hinted at the Rhone. Not that there aren't good ones, though.

I have had some that have had some flovors that I normally get from a Rhone wine. Edmunds St John makes interesting wines and in certain years gets some nice Rhone flavors out of a few of his wines.
post #176 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by guster View Post
No worries, I was rushing though the email and I am sure I did not write clearly.

I was trying to express that I hear people use "Rhone blend Style" in various ways. There does not seem to be a consistency in which the phrase is used. I was then trying to explain a few examples including:

- I hear it used as a flavor profile descriptor.

- Hear it used to describe a wine makeing style, much like "old world" vs "new world" winemaking styles.

- Hear it used to describe a syrah, grenache mouvedre wine from California that someone considers atypical to the normal California flavor profile for these grapes.

Ah, gotcha. I don't disagree with this.
post #177 of 246
Total pleb, live in expensive bc and don't have any money, but I really like the Penfolds Kanoonga Hill 2007 Cab-Shiraz. Fuck if I know if it's "good" or not but it's pretty tasty.
post #178 of 246
I really love the syrah and zinfandel from Bella vineyards... Small vineyard up in Healdsburg, CA. The syrah is great with a pork loin too.
post #179 of 246
Villa des Anges rose. 100% Cinsault and it just tastes so damn good, especially when its hot out, and especially with food. Great bang-for-buck.
post #180 of 246
Current delicious wines in rotation...

the white:


the red:


and the pink:


bonus alsacians:
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