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Delicious Wines - Page 11

post #151 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post
I've been drinking mostly (only?) Portuguese wines from the Douro and Dao regions lately. Fantastic QPR, every time.

I've recently learned that even in Pennsylvania (where wine & liquor is sold only at state stores), a pretty decent Douro only costs about $10.
post #152 of 246
OK, we're on summer wines.

Rose is good, but when the heat comes I love the southern French wines made from the regional grapes. Think Colombard and Ugni Blanc.

Domaine La Salette, although cheap at under $10 a bottle, is light and bright. And more than $30 the last time I saw it, Domaine Ott rings in as the heavy weight in the category. You can have the Rose, I want the Blanc de Blanc (Semillon and Ugni Blanc).

B
post #153 of 246
When I look for cheap reds, I generally stick to Italy and South America. YMMV.
post #154 of 246
While I just about completely agree with Manton on the whole CA = single varietal thing and that the AOC was a codification of tradition, not the other way 'round as someone has posited, I would note that the Paso area is making some very good Rhone style blends.
post #155 of 246
lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?
post #156 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?
I think this but I don't have much experience with them.
post #157 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?

I think it is a form of short hand. As some of you know better than I, 21 grapes are sanctioned for use when Rhone is looked at in total. However, many areas have a far smaller number of grapes proscribed for use, with I think, even a few appellations only allowing one grape. Then subdivide that roughly into northern (Syrah based) and southern (Grenache based) and you have a butt load of different blends going on.

So my suspicion is it's used as short hand for, "A blended wine that could be made from these grapes in Rhone" but eliminates potential consumer confusion over all the different grape varietals that could be used.

I've also noticed a fairly recent trend where a brand identification is being attempted for the so-called "GSM" wines, make of Grenache, Syrah, and Mouvedre.

IMO, it would seem to me the Paso area would be tailor made for making lush, southern Rhone type blends. The Booker and Saxxum I've tasted support this.
post #158 of 246
post #159 of 246
It's all about the garrigue.
post #160 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?

i'm not exactly sure what the question means, really. no offense. certainly rhone grhapes, but also, i think, a certain rhone style as well. there are cali syrahs that taste nothing like rhone and don't play that game at all. the question then becomes whether the "rhone rangers" are making rhone wines that have failed (don't taste the same as the originals), or whether they're making wines -- some of them pretty good -- that are "inspired by" the flavors of the rhone. just as cabs may be "inspired by" bordeaux, but don't taste just like them, and pinots are "inspired by" burgundy, without tasting just like them. or, for that matter, american "italian" food (even the "authentic" stuff) and "french" food isn't exactly the same.
rather than asking whether it tastes like Rayas, it's probably more interesting to ask whether it tastes good.
post #161 of 246
This wasn't bad at all for $13

post #162 of 246
^^^^

Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
and Corbières from the Languedoc Roussilon is a good bet under $10.

of course that was more expensive than $10, but Kermit Lynch is a very famous and well respected importer who finds wines in the style that I like (I see it as an emphasis on balance, integration, etc.). Happy to pay extra for stuff with his name on it.
post #163 of 246
And thank you! That statement is what led me to this. I hadn't ever tried a Corbières before. This was very interesting, and it seemed to change quite a bit after being open for about an hour or so.
post #164 of 246
Zachys just emailed about a burgundy closeout with some pretty incredible wines. Mugnier's chambolle, roulot's meursaults, bachelet's gevrey's, a bunch of fourrier and other assorted gems. None are particularly cheap but some of these are steals at the prices offered.

A
post #165 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post
Zachys just emailed about a burgundy closeout with some pretty incredible wines. Mugnier's chambolle, roulot's meursaults, bachelet's gevrey's, a bunch of fourrier and other assorted gems. None are particularly cheap but some of these are steals at the prices offered.

A

Their Rhone closeouts the other day were fantastic as well. '07 Beaucastel for $78.
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