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Pinot Noir - Page 2

post #16 of 34
^^^ Thanks. I came to Pinot many years ago through food. I wanted a wine that balanced better with a wide array of food flavors. I usually found Cab to be too heavy for all but the heaviest food. Look at the typical Cab wine tasting dinner. The entre is always steak or maybe venison in a port reduction. Pinot goes with everything except maybe the lightest Asian food. Funnily enough, I don't really care for Chardonnay, usually associated with Pinot's as a white. Love White Burgundy though
post #17 of 34
one thing to remember about pinot (well, a couple): it's enormously fickle and changeable. that can make it frustrating to buy. taste a great bordeaux and you know pretty much what cab is about, allowing for variations. taste a great burgundy and you know only one face of pinot noir (and there are many faces even within burgundy). it's a challenging grape because it forces you as a taster to react to it on its own merits ... bringing a template of what you think pinot should taste like will probably lead you to be disappointed in most of them.
post #18 of 34
I bet you that if you had a $100 bottle of Pinot and a $100 bottle of a Cabernet, the Pinot would be hands down the winner in terms of taste and satisfaction.

Cabernets are overpriced when compared to Pinot Noirs.
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by OakCreekHitter View Post
I bet you that if you had a $100 bottle of Pinot and a $100 bottle of a Cabernet, the Pinot would be hands down the winner in terms of taste and satisfaction.

Cabernets are overpriced when compared to Pinot Noirs.

Oh, bad generalization. IMO, some of the most over priced bottles are certain Burgs.
post #20 of 34
there are plenty of overpriced wines from both varietals.
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
there are plenty of overpriced wines from both varietals.

Agreed- and with Pinot prices rising as they have...
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by OakCreekHitter View Post
I bet you that if you had a $100 bottle of Pinot and a $100 bottle of a Cabernet, the Pinot would be hands down the winner in terms of taste and satisfaction.

Cabernets are overpriced when compared to Pinot Noirs.

Actually I think it's more likely the other way around.

Pinot's are supposed to be a more expensive grape to grow, so you have to pay more than a Cabernet in general.
post #23 of 34
on the flip side, a tiny plot of land in Napa is ridiculously expensive, and what happens is retired millionaires pay a huge amount for the plot and then churn out a wine that they pretty much have to charge $125-150 a bottle for.

I'll buy cab at the lower price point (<$30), but always an AOC Bordeaux (yes, most will have Merlot, blah blah). From like $40-100 I certainly buy more pinot, only because I love a great Burgundy. I do have half a case of Cali Pinot arriving, we'll see how that goes. At $100+ anything is game and it comes down to my personal preference (so not Cali Cab)
post #24 of 34
last i heard, planted vineyard on the valley floor was at about $150,000 per acre. you almost have to get $150 a bottle to pay that off ... if, indeed, you are planning on making a business at all, rather than pursuing a lifestyle. personally, i almost never buy bottles that are more than $100. Hell, I almost never buy bottles that are more than $75. I did at one point in my life and I've still got a couple cases in the cellar. just don't drink them that often.
post #25 of 34
Have never bought a bottle over $70. There's just too much great wine that's cheaper than that.
post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Have never bought a bottle over $70. There's just too much great wine that's cheaper than that.
I certainly have, but as a rule I stay under $30 when buying for home. I don't ever feel I am missing out in doing so. Perhaps I will buy a little in the 30-50 range, and a few bottles for 50-75 each year, usually to store.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I certainly have, but as a rule I stay under $30 when buying for home. I don't ever feel I am missing out in doing so. Perhaps I will buy a little in the 30-50 range, and a few bottles for 50-75 each year, usually to store.

+1. Any expensive bottles I've purchased as of late have either been consumed for a special occasion or are more expensive simply because they have a bit of age on them and I'll pay a premium for it (and then serve on a special occasion).
post #28 of 34
I'll be buying two bottles of Billecart-Salmon Rose Brut NV for gifts in the following couple of months. I feel a lump in my throat already.
post #29 of 34
I don't like all this talk of inexpensive wine when certain persons here are trying their damndest to get me into aged white Burg...and it's working!
post #30 of 34
I have several US Pinots I really like. Some vintages (not all) of Cambria Pinots are quite good and the Julia's Vineyard bottling at $20per isn't a bad value. 2006 was wonderful. Stepping up the cost ladder, Goldeneye is just yummy, but at $50+ per is a more serious commitment. I've not had as good luck finding Washington/Oregon Pinots I like as much.

As for Burgs, don't get me started. My hit rate on finding good wine from Burgundy is dreadful. The 2006 Bouchard Beaune du Chateau ($35) was a standout. Beyond that most of what I had this year ranged from swill to merely disappointing. I'm leaving the 2004 AF Gros Richbourg I had out of this because I'm convinced I did that wine no favors by drinking it so young (it got a lot better the longer it was open).

Any sane person would stop going there, instead I'm still chasing the Burgundy dragon. Picked up two more bottles this week to try. Both are 2007's. One I'll probably age a bit, the other I plan on opening soon. Both are pretty expensive ($55 and $85). I do think that as a consumer it's fair that when they raise their prices I raise my expectations. At some point if I can't sort Burgundy out a bit better I'll just abandon it altogether. There are too many other delicious wines out there at more reasonable prices to waste more time and money chasing that which continues to elude me.
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