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Pinot Noir

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
When it comes to red wines I am a Cabernet Sauvignon drinker both with food and by itself when I need to sit down and ponder life. However, I have decided to be open minded and see what all the fuss is about regarding Pinot Noir and purchased a medium bottle made in Otago New Zealand which is where some of the better Pinot’s are meant to come from from 'New World'. I tried the Pinot along with a glass of my ‘table’ quality Cabernet Sauvignon I had open (half the price of the Pinot) in order to make the tasting comparisson. I was very under whelmed. I am not sure whether it was because I should have drunk it with food but otherwise it was dull, boring, and tasted like a diluted Shiraz. If it needs to be paired with food that is fine; however, by itself as a thinkers wine it fails and I have not been sold. Happy to be convinced otherwise by regular Pinot drinkers.
post #2 of 34
Try a Pinot Noir from Oregon, afaik they require 100% pinot noir grapes whereas anywhere else you will most likely find them blended with something else. I suggest pairing Pinot Noir with salmon.
post #3 of 34
Star I normally drink cab sav or shiraz, and I too find pinots underwhelming. I don't think it's possible once you are drinking the bigger reds all the time to find pinot anything but bland, that's just my 2 cents though...
post #4 of 34
It's more like you're used to Cab Sauv's heavier taste. It's like some guy who drink red tea for all his life then try to truly appreciate green/white tea in 1 cup (glass here).
post #5 of 34
post #6 of 34
Drink what you like.
post #7 of 34
dunno about the kind you tried but pinot is my favorite type of wine and the varieties I tend to enjoy the most are from California. I'd give BV, Robert Mondavi and Mark West (specializes in Pinot exclusively) a try if you can find them, they're inexpensive but very good and available in most major supermarkets here on the east coast. i don't bother with any other type of wine because pinot just tastes so much better than anything else imo.
post #8 of 34
Try a really good Burgundy to see how it's really supposed to taste, then venture off to the New World.
post #9 of 34
I used to be a serious Cab Sav drinker all year round but then I discovered Pinot Noir and began my journey via Geelong, and the Mornington Peninsula and Tasmania. I have not been disappointed in my quest and have a few particular bands that I stick with but I am always open to suggestions. Last week I tried Tamar Ridge South a Tasmanian Pinot Noir which was fucking awaresome for a $20 bottle of wine it was more akin to a $30+ bottle mind you i opened it early and let it breathe but still its great. I have always favoured Marlbrough as a region over Otago when it comes to NZ pinots but like all things in life its a matter of personal taste. For me I like nothing more than couple of times a year to sit down with the wife, a good meal or a good game of Rugby and truck into a bottle of Kooyong Estate Ferous Vineyard or the Haven both adorable wines, pity their so dammed expensive on my wage.(SIGH)
post #10 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
Try a really good Burgundy to see how it's really supposed to taste, then venture off to the New World.

...and you would suggest?
post #11 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post
I used to be a serious Cab Sav drinker all year round but then I discovered Pinot Noir and began my journey via Geelong, and the Mornington Peninsula and Tasmania. I have not been disappointed in my quest and have a few particular bands that I stick with but I am always open to suggestions.


Im with this kid. New Zealand has a reputation for the best pinot in the new world, but i still have a preference for the cold climate wines of australia. Australia is typically known for 'big reds', and thats what youll find in the export markets, but there is an abundance of great pinot from boutique vineyards that dont make it outside australia.

i am not a fan of north american pinots, although not vastly experienced. Chilean on the other hand, ive had some great tasting and great value pinots from there.
post #12 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star View Post
...and you would suggest?

You really just have to try a bunch and find your taste, as the grower can make a big difference. Also, the pinot grape seems more inconsistent from year to year compared to cabernet. There are going to be more disappointments, especially since the wines cost a bit more, but the good ones are really good.

Growers like Armand Rousseau, Comte Georges du Vogue turned me on to Burgundy wines when I first started trying all kinds.
post #13 of 34
There's a thread, currently just over 600 pages, on wine. Might I suggest reading that for some opinions? Here's a good jumping in point: http://www.styleforum.net/showthread...29315&page=202

FYI, Manton could write a book on Burgundy.
post #14 of 34
Pinot is much lower in tanin than Cabernet and has a much different flavor profile. You are probably going to have to drink pinot for a while before you can re-calibrate to it's much softer flavors. You might do better with a Pinot that has really pronounced grape flavors, like French Burgundy, Russian River/Sonoma Coast, or Oregan pinot's. I don't drink enough French Burgundy to make a recommendation, but for Russian River try Flowers or Kosta Browne. For Oregan try Domaine Druhin.

A friend of mine distributes wine for a number of smaller Napa/Sonoma wineries. He told me that every winemaker he knows, without exception, favorite wine is Pinot Noir. Great that you are giving it a try.
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyTailorIsRich View Post
Pinot is much lower in tanin than Cabernet and has a much different flavor profile. You are probably going to have to drink pinot for a while before you can re-calibrate to it's much softer flavors. You might do better with a Pinot that has really pronounced grape flavors, like French Burgundy, Russian River/Sonoma Coast, or Oregan pinot's. I don't drink enough French Burgundy to make a recommendation, but for Russian River try Flowers or Kosta Browne. For Oregan try Domaine Druhin.

A friend of mine distributes wine for a number of smaller Napa/Sonoma wineries. He told me that every winemaker he knows, without exception, favorite wine is Pinot Noir. Great that you are giving it a try.

Great post. I Mentioned JK Carriere Pinot in the main wine thread. There are a number of great Willamette and Walla Walla Pinot's...

But if your taste preference is heavily toward "new world", over-oaked, fruit-bomb cabs, then you just may never care for the best Pinots and Burgs.

I came to Pinot via the big Northern Italians, Langhe, Roero etc... but have happily found Pinot's a I really like... all generally in a "old world" style.
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