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Difficult for "older" students to into top MBA programs? - Page 2

post #16 of 21
I know a current MBA student at a top 10 who also works in the admissions office, and I do believe that age is a factor and the reasoning is they want you to be younger than 30 entering the workforce. This may be simply the case now because of the current economic situation and probable increase in younger MBA applicants. Could always consider executive MBA programs.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by godofcoffee View Post
b) A lot of people cynically refer to business school as the country club years, and I think this characterization is accurate - more so at the best business schools than the worst ones. At the very top, spending your time networking with future CEOs is a lot more important than actually learning. Some of my b-school friends have confessed that even though b-school is a great deal (signalling effects and connections), they learned practically nothing, and nobody cares much about grades. On the other hand, hanging out for 3 years and making bank afterward doesn't sound so bad to me.

absolutely. i don't think most top mba applicants, like myself, expect to learn anything groundshattering that they could not learn with a couple of XXX for dummies and itunes u lectures. it's the recruiting and the opportunities to advance or change industry/market that you're really paying the 150k for.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indianshaft View Post
I know a current MBA student at a top 10 who also works in the admissions office, and I do believe that age is a factor and the reasoning is they want you to be younger than 30 entering the workforce. This may be simply the case now because of the current economic situation and probable increase in younger MBA applicants. Could always consider executive MBA programs.

It really depends on the school. Places like Kellogg, Ross, and Tuck will have very large numbers of students over the age of thirty whereas Stanford and Harvard usually only admit older applicants if they were off winning an Olympic medal or taking down the Taliban in their twenties.

And executive MBAs are for people who've been the workforce for 15 years, not for 31 year olds.
post #19 of 21
Just curious, how do business schools' admissions offices vet out older candidates? I'm guessing that they can't explicitly prefer young students, or maybe they can, I don't know the law. What would be the recourse if they can't officially say "we prefer younger students,"..."oh, we prefer students who have yet to make a mark, or we prefer students who are so great that they do not need to do business school in their earlier thirties, etc.?"

That was the most convoluted question the history of SF.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirGrotius View Post
Just curious, how do business schools' admissions offices vet out older candidates? I'm guessing that they can't explicitly prefer young students, or maybe they can, I don't know the law. What would be the recourse if they can't officially say "we prefer younger students,"..."oh, we prefer students who have yet to make a mark, or we prefer students who are so great that they do not need to do business school in their earlier thirties, etc.?"

That was the most convoluted question the history of SF.

Basically you can't discriminate on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. but beyond that you can choose to admit who you want, no matter how arbitrary. Most schools who eliminate applicants because of their age will explain it as the candidate not fitting the "class profile" or something like that. But in reality adcoms can do mostly what they want especially since proving that you were discriminated against is incredibly difficult.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirGrotius View Post
Just curious, how do business schools' admissions offices vet out older candidates? I'm guessing that they can't explicitly prefer young students, or maybe they can, I don't know the law. What would be the recourse if they can't officially say "we prefer younger students,"..."oh, we prefer students who have yet to make a mark, or we prefer students who are so great that they do not need to do business school in their earlier thirties, etc.?"

That was the most convoluted question the history of SF.

They largely could say that, but it would be gauche.

To drop some legalism on you; "age is not a protected class." Age isn't an immutable characteristic the way race or gender is.
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