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What are you drinking right now? - Page 665

post #9961 of 14481

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Oh, and on the subject of books, I have The Cocktail Bible by Linda Doeser and The Essential Cocktail by Dale Degroff. Are these considered good? The Degroff one seems awesome from my five minute look.

I actually posted in a thread specifically about cocktail books sometime back. The problem is that each author has their own bugaboo which they cast upon the world of cocktails. There is no true real compendium bible book that I respect. I find blogs far more useful. Degroff, for instance, doesn't use egg white in his sours, which I have a really hard time with. It adds so much!!! Anyway:

 

Ted Haigh's book: Vintage cocktails and sprits or something like that -- GREAT book, but you need TONS of crazy ingredients

Savoy Cocktail Book: Most of the drinks I love come from the Savoy, but the book has antiquated and useless measures

Degroff's Art of the Cocktail: My first book, and it is generally quite sound indeed (aforementioned caveat with Degroff -- he takes a lot of recipe license)

PDT: Not a beginner's book. You need to many ingredients, and a good sense of what works and doesn't for your own palate to bother

 

Eh, when I get some more time I'll consider some more.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Okay, have had a martini and a (kind of) manhattan. someone recommend something else with my ingredients!


I forget what you have. If Campari, then both the Negroni and it's bourboun cousin, the Boulevardier. And also the fruit-punch-like Lucien Gaudin. You could also make the gin based sidecar called the White Lady. I would also make sours with egg white and lemon and lime juices.

 

~ H

 

post #9962 of 14481
i tried an eagle rare 17 over the weekend at village whiskey in philly

it was really good but basically a more complex buffalo trace (more caramel, vanilla notes, slightly more citrus, acidic)

i wouldn't spend money on a bottle for it but wouldnt mind some now and then
post #9963 of 14481
Havana Club Barrel proof

I don't know. I think I've come to the realization that I just don't enjoy rum all that much. I find most rums cloyingly sweet and the caramel/toffee/burnt toffee flavours are just so over-top and so prevalent in the profile of the drink that I just can't seem to get behind them. Any time I sit down and have a nice rum, I end up thinking how much better it would be if the brown liquor in my glass was a bourbon instead.

Any suggestions for getting over my anti-rum funk?
post #9964 of 14481
Probably won't directly help you enjoy rums neat, but Ranglum (Dark Rum, Wray & Nephew 63°, Falernum, Lime) is a wonderful cocktail.

3:13
He's doesn't seem too comfortable doing the vid but whatever.
post #9965 of 14481
Quote:
Originally Posted by denning View Post

Havana Club Barrel proof
I don't know. I think I've come to the realization that I just don't enjoy rum all that much. I find most rums cloyingly sweet and the caramel/toffee/burnt toffee flavours are just so over-top and so prevalent in the profile of the drink that I just can't seem to get behind them. Any time I sit down and have a nice rum, I end up thinking how much better it would be if the brown liquor in my glass was a bourbon instead.
Any suggestions for getting over my anti-rum funk?

Cuban rums tend to be very sweet in my experience. Try a dryer rum like El Dorado 15 or Haitian Barbancourt 8. Another route you could go would be rhum agricole like Clement or St. James, those are much less sweet and seem to be more terrior driven.

Also, next time you are in MN please bring me a bottle of Havana Club Barrel Proof! smile.gif
post #9966 of 14481
dp
post #9967 of 14481
Aperitif: Negroni 1.33:1:1 Carpano Antico, Beefeater, Campari.

Digestif: Gin Basil Smash cause basil was on offer again (.99€ per pot)

263

10cl Beefeater
4cl lemon juice
4cl Monin simple syrup
60 mid-to-big-sized basil leaves. Muddled pretty hard, let it sit for a minute or three.
Mmmm.

263
post #9968 of 14481
Is any of the "The Bitter Truth" bitters comparable to Peychaud's? From the name alone, the creole bitters should be similar. But what about Old Time Aromatic Bitters (http://the-bitter-truth.com/bitter/old-time-aromatic-bitters/) or Jerry Thomas' Bitters (http://the-bitter-truth.com/bitter/jerry-thomas/)? Or is the original not comparable to anything? I haven't seen the Peychaud's offline, but I can order them online -- and while I`m ordering, I can get some Gran Classico, too wink.gif.
post #9969 of 14481
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Is any of the "The Bitter Truth" bitters comparable to Peychaud's? From the name alone, the creole bitters should be similar. But what about Old Time Aromatic Bitters (http://the-bitter-truth.com/bitter/old-time-aromatic-bitters/) or Jerry Thomas' Bitters (http://the-bitter-truth.com/bitter/jerry-thomas/)? Or is the original not comparable to anything? I haven't seen the Peychaud's offline, but I can order them online -- and while I`m ordering, I can get some Gran Classico, too wink.gif.

Aromatic bitters should be similar to Angostura.
post #9970 of 14481
Great! Thanks. It's the one I have. I'll have a Sazerac with TBT Aromatic Bitters as a bedtime drink.
post #9971 of 14481
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Great! Thanks. It's the one I have. I'll have a Sazerac with TBT Aromatic Bitters as a bedtime drink.

icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #9972 of 14481
Yummy!


Oh, Kyle, if you're not aware of it, the videos of Chris McMillian (a lot are available through http://www.youtube.com/user/keithmarszalek ) are fun to watch and you'll grasp some of the history, too.
post #9973 of 14481
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Yummy!
Oh, Kyle, if you're not aware of it, the videos of Chris McMillian (a lot are available through http://www.youtube.com/user/keithmarszalek ) are fun to watch and you'll grasp some of the history, too.

+1 Chris McMillian.

He is a real gentlemen and true master of his craft. He bartend at Bar Uncommon now, worth a visit if you're in town.
post #9974 of 14481
Quote:
Originally Posted by denning View Post

Any suggestions for getting over my anti-rum funk?

Bourbon is generally my #1 choice as well... That being said, I don't know how you wouldn't love Zacapa 23. So damn good... even better w/ a choice cigar.
post #9975 of 14481

Thought this might be appropriate for this thread.

Looking Back to the 1800s for a Properly Bitter Cocktail

By FLORENCE FABRICANT

Published: March 20, 2012

 

In today’s ramped-up bar culture, the sweetness of Curaçao or Triple Sec, the orange liqueurs used in many classic cocktails, did not satisfy David Wondrich, the drinks historian and expert. So he worked with Alexandre Gabriel, the president of Cognac Ferrand in France, to develop a drier bitter orange Curaçao, like the kind made back in the 1800s.

 

They researched 19th-century recipes, and the result is Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao Ancienne Méthod, made with an infusion of the dried skins of Seville oranges in unaged, clear brandy. The spirit is redistilled and blended with Cognac, seasonings like anise and grilled sugar, and more orange peels. It is then barrel-aged and emerges smooth, veiled with orange, kissed with sweetness and hinting of juniper, almonds and vanilla. Mr. Wondrich wrote the tasting and historic notes on the label.

 

Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao Ancienne Méthod is 40 percent alcohol and comes in 750-milliliter bottles for $25.99 at Astor Wines and Spirits, and $26.99 from drinkupny.com; both of them expect to have the drink in stock next week.

21STUFF_CURACAO-articleInline.jpg


Edited by Cordwinder - 3/28/12 at 12:22am
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