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What are you drinking right now? - Page 259

post #3871 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
You mention Bouchard and I've unfortunately had spotty luck with him, even on some $50-90 offerings. I've been leaning away from the negotiants and I've started to really appreciate the wineries that are there with the grapes from start to finish.


The 07 Bourgone Chard is my only experience with Bouchard offerings and I think it was around $20 but I did love the yellow oakiness to it. But I have to tend to agree with you that I prefer wines that are grown and produced by the same winery...but I'm still a n00b at all this...
post #3872 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Mind sharing a name or location for my final month in Chicago?

Absolutely!

Here's their website: http://www.marionstreetcheesemarket.com/

If you drive they're on the corner of Marion and South Blvd in Oak Park. If you take the "L" just take the Green Like to Oak Park/Harlem (end of the line) and walk east!

Just tell Candy Jason sent you

EDIT: Oh and the do free tastings on Friday from 4pm to 7pm and on Saturday from 1pm to 4pm They feature wines as well as some great craft brews! Charles, the beermonger, gets some great little bottlings!
post #3873 of 14484
This place looks awesome! I think I'll start going there instead of Sam's. And that cheese selection

Thanks J.
post #3874 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by PandArts View Post
The 07 Bourgone Chard is my only experience with Bouchard offerings and I think it was around $20 but I did love the yellow oakiness to it. But I have to tend to agree with you that I prefer wines that are grown and produced by the same winery...but I'm still a n00b at all this...

I still rate myself a n00b too, the area of study is just immense for wines. I think there is an interesting mix of people here on SF with clear regional preferences (Pio is all west coast, you rock the Spanish and S. American selections, then 80% of my purchases are Italian). Makes it quite entertaining.

Speaking of whites, I've really tried to explore the Italian whites on the scene and they have been just awesome. Lots of fruit, acidity, and that classic Italian character that we see in the red wines. Areas like Vermentino, Soave, etc. are just producing some marvelous stuff that is clearly under the radar from most people's shopping carts.
post #3875 of 14484
I applaud you Gomestar. Italian wines are hard to freakin "get." There are so many varieties. My wine teacher told me that he was friends with the sommelier at Spiaggia restaurant, probably the #1 Italian joint in Chicago, and the guy kept saying he had to learn more and more and more. And my teacher was like "learn more? you've got one country man, get with it." but there are just so many different kinds, it takes a lifetime to truly understand them.
Outside of Spumante d'asti, a little bit of Tuscan wines, and Barbarello, Italian wines are like an entirely different planet to me.
post #3876 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
This place looks awesome! I think I'll start going there instead of Sam's. And that cheese selection

Thanks J.


It is an awesome place and they really do know their stuff! I feel blessed to live a block away!!!


Anytime!
post #3877 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
I still rate myself a n00b too, the area of study is just immense for wines. I think there is an interesting mix of people here on SF with clear regional preferences (Pio is all west coast, you rock the Spanish and S. American selections, then 80% of my purchases are Italian). Makes it quite entertaining.

Speaking of whites, I've really tried to explore the Italian whites on the scene and they have been just awesome. Lots of fruit, acidity, and that classic Italian character that we see in the red wines. Areas like Vermentino, Soave, etc. are just producing some marvelous stuff that is clearly under the radar from most people's shopping carts.

It's so true about the SF community...I love reading this thread!

I'll have to ask Candy about some of those regions and see if she has or can get anything from them. Spain is much the same when it comes to under-the-radar regions. For most it's Rioja and in particual Rioja-Alta and those wines can run quite high on the price point scale. But jump two regions to the east to Rioja-Baja and you get some amazing crianzas for half the price. Campo de Borja, just south of Rioja and a bit higher in elevation is also a great producer of crianza with grenache grapes just bursting with deep colours and dark flavours. Beirzo, just north of Portugal also has great offerings and all nearly a third of a Rioja price. The downside is that the whites from many of these regions just don't add up right now
post #3878 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I applaud you Gomestar. Italian wines are hard to freakin "get." There are so many varieties. My wine teacher told me that he was friends with the sommelier at Spiaggia restaurant, probably the #1 Italian joint in Chicago, and the guy kept saying he had to learn more and more and more. And my teacher was like "learn more? you've got one country man, get with it." but there are just so many different kinds, it takes a lifetime to truly understand them.
Outside of Spumante d'asti, a little bit of Tuscan wines, and Barbarello, Italian wines are like an entirely different planet to me.

haha, thank you. Italian wines are extremely complex, I've devoted many hours of study to the subject, have visited a few regions and talked with the wine makers, and I still feel marginal in knowledge. But, for me, that's the draw to it all. Its the discovery, the understanding behing the regions, the grape choices, the history, etc. Once you really visit an area like Tuscany, you'll be hooked for life, and I was bitten by the Italian bug a little while ago.

Barbarello - that a mix of Barolo, Barbera, and Brunello?
post #3879 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
haha, thank you. Italian wines are extremely complex, I've devoted many hours of study to the subject, have visited a few regions and talked with the wine makers, and I still feel marginal in knowledge. But, for me, that's the draw to it all. Its the discovery, the understanding behing the regions, the grape choices, the history, etc. Once you really visit an area like Tuscany, you'll be hooked for life, and I was bitten by the Italian bug a little while ago.

Barbarello - that a mix of Barolo, Barbera, and Brunello?


I would love to be able to tour Argentina and Spain! Someday! But I do a ton of reading about every region I sample a wine from so that I can appreciate the wine's background that much more! I just would love to have first hand experience of that context! I did a little in Napa and Sonoma...I could spend all day smelling the air in the cask rooms

I tasted a Nebbiolo that I absolutely loved!!! However, it was a $40 bottle, which was ans still is, ot of my price point for now!
post #3880 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
Barbarello - that a mix of Barolo, Barbera, and Brunello?

See? I know even less than I thought I did. I'd love to take a trip to Tuscany though.
post #3881 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by PandArts View Post
Spain is much the same when it comes to under-the-radar regions.

Spain absolutely is under the radar, great values from Spain and also Portugal. Unfortunately, my knowledge on these regions is pretty limited to only a handful of regions and grape varietals. One day I'll get there, one day...
post #3882 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
See? I know even less than I thought I did. I'd love to take a trip to Tuscany though.

Tuscany is absolutely beautiful. And the ability to pick up some serious wine at hilariously low prices is very tempting, Brunello di Montalcino that is $75-90 in the US is about 25-35 Euro over there. I took some great pictures in Tuscany, I'll post one or two when I'm home and I have access to my webshots account.

Chianti, unfortunately, is getting more and more expensive in the US. The solution? Look for other DOCG Tuscan regions, they're mostly made of the same grape (Sangeovese, with a few small exceptions like Sangeovese Grosso in Montalcino, etc.). Some areas of note are Morellino di Scansano, Carmigniano, or Vino Nobile di Montepulciano (not to be confused with Montepulciano d'Abruzzo). IMO, great value regions that don't have the name of Chianti and thus lower prices.
post #3883 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
Spain absolutely is under the radar, great values from Spain and also Portugal. Unfortunately, my knowledge on these regions is pretty limited to only a handful of regions and grape varietals. One day I'll get there, one day...


Yeah the Douro region of Portugal has some great wines. Dos Grios and Quinto Do Coa are two that I've had and love! The first being under $15 and the second about $20!
post #3884 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by PandArts View Post

I tasted a Nebbiolo that I absolutely loved!!! However, it was a $40 bottle, which was ans still is, ot of my price point for now!

yeah, Nebbiolo will push the price point. Its such a difficult and picky grape to grow, even rain at the wrong time can do horrible damage to a vintage.

For lower priced versions, check out Lange, Gattinara, and Gheme, I believe all are DOCG regions and they all produce nebbiolo that is easier to approach in its youth (as opposed to the notoriously tough Barolo and Barbaresco). Still, I default to at least 24 hours of decanting for any nebbiolo wine.
post #3885 of 14484
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
yeah, Nebbiolo will push the price point. Its such a difficult and picky grape to grow, even rain at the wrong time can do horrible damage to a vintage.

For lower priced versions, check out Lange, Gattinara, and Gheme, I believe all are DOCG regions and they all produce nebbiolo that is easier to approach in its youth (as opposed to the notoriously tough Barolo and Barbaresco). Still, I default to at least 24 hours of decanting for any nebbiolo wine.


Awesome! Thanks for that info!
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