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What are you drinking right now? - Page 125

post #1861 of 13985
Lagavulin 1991 Distiller's Edition. Neat.

Not a bad dram...a little sweet. I think I like the regular 16-year old better.
post #1862 of 13985
Brooklyn Brewery Monster ale. 2005 vintage so the hops had some time to soften up. Excellent beer. I have a few more bottles I am aging.
post #1863 of 13985
Rip it energy fuel....my cheap fix for the afternoon!
post #1864 of 13985
I'm a Philistine. Macallan 18. Rocks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
The quality of bartenders often fails to match the quality of bottles behind the bar these days, no?
Ciminey, does it ever -- I just wanted to go back home. Would it be ridiculous to move to be nearer your favorite bar? I'm thinking about it.... ~ Huntsman
post #1865 of 13985
Samuel Smith's IPA. I haven't had a non-American IPA in a long time.
post #1866 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
I'm a Philistine.

Macallan 18.

Rocks.

~ Huntsman


Rocks??????? That poor teenage Macallan. Getting watered down for no good reason.
post #1867 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wick View Post
Rocks??????? That poor teenage Macallan. Getting watered down for no good reason.

I always feel like with whiskey, bourbon, or scotch, just a little bit of ice enhances the flavor. My parents were at a Jameson's whiskey tasting a few months back and they said that the Jameson rep suggested having a drink of straight whiskey, then putting a single droplet of water in the glass and then having a taste, and then placing an entire ice cube in the drink and having a taste. My father reported back to me that neither with the single droplet nor with the entire ice cube did the drink taste watered down, but that the water brought out intense flavors that you couldn't taste when drinking it neat.
post #1868 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I always feel like with whiskey, bourbon, or scotch, just a little bit of ice enhances the flavor. My parents were at a Jameson's whiskey tasting a few months back and they said that the Jameson rep suggested having a drink of straight whiskey, then putting a single droplet of water in the glass and then having a taste, and then placing an entire ice cube in the drink and having a taste. My father reported back to me that neither with the single droplet nor with the entire ice cube did the drink taste watered down, but that the water brought out intense flavors that you couldn't taste when drinking it neat.
A splash of water in most bourbons and scotches really opens up the flavor.
post #1869 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
A splash of water in most bourbons and scotches really opens up the flavor.

Just for the record, I was just ribbing Huntsman. Everyone has different tastes.

I agree with the splash. I too have splashed my scotches with a little water...emphasis on little. I suppose that I perceive "rocks" as meaning several ice cubes.
post #1870 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I always feel like with whiskey, bourbon, or scotch, just a little bit of ice enhances the flavor. My parents were at a Jameson's whiskey tasting a few months back and they said that the Jameson rep suggested having a drink of straight whiskey, then putting a single droplet of water in the glass and then having a taste, and then placing an entire ice cube in the drink and having a taste. My father reported back to me that neither with the single droplet nor with the entire ice cube did the drink taste watered down, but that the water brought out intense flavors that you couldn't taste when drinking it neat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wick View Post
Just for the record, I was just ribbing Huntsman. Everyone has different tastes. I agree with the splash. I too have splashed my scotches with a little water...emphasis on little. I suppose that I perceive "rocks" as meaning several ice cubes.
No worries, wick. 90% of the time, I take my whiskies with a splash (no more than 10% by volume, but they're all different) of distilled water. I do the one cube thing sometimes, and very occasionally, in the summer I like some serious rocks, and yeah, it was three or four. I don't drink much scotch in the summer. In truth, I'm a little confused by the watering down business. There are two sides that I see -- 1) much above 80pf there's so much alcohol that the 'burn' overrides some subtleties, hence the splash of water to 'open it up,' as whisky-drinkers say. But then there is 2) which is the degree to which some aromatic/flavor compounds are only alcohol-soluble and therefore only available to the taste when in solution. Case in point -- Pernod. The common method is with water, and as you drop the proof, alcohol-soluble components come out of the now-dilute solution and turn it into this messy colloidal suspension. I don't like the taste. Some of the new subtle flavors are off-putting to me. I prefer it straight, as the anise is far more direct and cleaner. In this case it would seem that because of the higher proof, only the strongest of flavors are coming through and the quieter ones I dislike are muted. But what about cask-strength scotch? Ought you dilute to get the subtleties that the high alcohol masks, or should you take it neat because of flavors you can only taste at that proof? Probably will just come down to what you like for that particular whisky, because the chemical profile varies so much. I really don't have enough at high proof to experiment. ~ Huntsman
post #1871 of 13985


A surprising bargain Scotch at 20-25/bottle. A good example of a light, clean Speyside - good scotch to get a lady friend who is lairy of whisky into.

Has a nice citrus/nutty aftertaste, and isn't drowning in peat like an Islay.
post #1872 of 13985
post #1873 of 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
But what about cask-strength scotch? Ought you dilute to get the subtleties that the high alcohol masks, or should you take it neat because of flavors you can only taste at that proof? Probably will just come down to what you like for that particular whisky, because the chemical profile varies so much. I really don't have enough at high proof to experiment.

~ Huntsman

I dunno for sure, but I can guarantee you I'm willin to keep drinkin and find out.
post #1874 of 13985
I rarely sip my Scotch neat. Once in a while, when it is a very good one, and I am just having that one dram, it will be neat. I somewhat more frequently have a splash of chilled, filtered water. My usual way is on the rocks. I like the way I experience different levels of taste as the ice melts. By the end of the glass, subtle things you would never taste, unless the alcohol had been greatly attenuated, are there for the tasting. I know ice is heresy to some, but it is the usual way I enjoy my Scotch.
post #1875 of 13985
Talisker 10 yr with Canada Dry ginger ale. At first I tried it neat but I, admittedly, couldn't handle it. I'm new to Scotch and this Talisker is a little too smokey and extreme for me. Any suggestions for a slightly sweeter Scotch?
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