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post #11626 of 14149
I would go for green first. If not for the general variety of cocktails that call for it, then simply because a The Last Word is that good.
I sometimes miss the yellow for a Widow's Kiss, so I think I'll get some soon. It's not that expensive around here anyway.
post #11627 of 14149
Let me know what you think of the dry Curacao. It has caught my interest of late. Btw, will send you that recipe today.
post #11628 of 14149
Thanks, and yes, I will. smile.gif
The riesling isn't bad per se -- it has some interesting acidity and fruitiness -- but it somehow lacks much body. Overall disappointing for the money, definitely better stuff out there.
post #11629 of 14149
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

I'm going to pick up some Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao tomorrow. How is it in a Pegu Club (actually never had one)? Some other cocktail ideas, besides Brandy Crusta or El Presidente for it?

Right now, Dark & Stormy while watching the game. Also a bottle of Robert Weil Riesling kabinett trocken in the fridge. An Old Fashioned or Manhattan in the break.

 

I don't like using the Ferrand Dry Curacao in cocktails with a gin base; I feel that the distinct brandy note clashes. I have a bottle, and I've had cocktails out with it, but have not yet been impressed' it reminds me very much of a rougher Grand Marnier Centenaire. No reason not to make the Pegu Club with Cointreau. Using it in a cocktail with brandy just seems redundant, as in a Sidecar. Might be good in a rye, bourbon, or Calvados cocktail. Where it really might shine is as the base for a cocktail, but I've not gotten that far with it.

 

The first time I saw it, I was in a very high-end cocktail bar in DC, and when I asked for bartender's choice with it, they made me a Savoy CR#2; I was like, really?  It wasn't very good in that role.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

I want to get a bottle of Chartreuse, but I don't want to drop $100 getting green and yellow. Which of the two is more useful?

 

For my taste, I've been finding more and more that I do not like mixing really fresh, herbal things with brown spirits; thus, green chartreuse with rye, bourbon, etc. The Widow's Kiss for instance, I think is quite awful with green; but incredible with yellow. Likewise with the Champs Elysses. The reverse is not true;however, and I have no problem mixing Yellow with gin. The Last Word, however, is a sublime cocktail, but that is the only thing that I use Green for consistently at the moment, though I've tried a number of cocktails with it (edit: Songbird, which combines gin, lemon, St. germain, and Green Chartreuse is worthwhile). Here's my favorite Yellow recipe: My version of the Smoke And Chartreuse, with credit to the originator of the cocktail (it may be Felten, not sure, the article has disappeared from the Web) and ESR, wherever life finds her:

 

1.25 oz Yellow Chartreuse

0.5 oz Dolin Blanc vermouth

0.25 oz Lillet Blanc

0.25 oz Laphroaig 18

 

Stir over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Float a barspoon Laph 18 on top.

 

~ H


Edited by Huntsman - 2/3/13 at 5:12pm
post #11630 of 14149
Thanks for the heads up. I have a high opinion of your judgements, so I will tell you this: I won't get a bottle of the Pierre Ferrand tomorrow (sorry, Kyle). I won't have access to my liquor stock for the next two months, so I'll probably get some Dolin dry tomorrow. Also need to restock bourbon (see below). Maybe Cointreau as a mixer.

Just made myself an xxl-Manhattan (the breaks at the Superbowl are annoying, and they're just a tad too short for making a new cocktail), even for Piob standards ( I guess). Was a tad too too generous with the bitters. So I mixed 4 oz of Four Roses, 2oz of Cinzano rosso, 1 drop of Angostura orange, 4 drops of Hella Bitter's aromatic bitters (thanks again, indesertum). The bitters were much too strong, so I added another 1.5 oz of Four Roses and .75 oz of Cinzano rosso. Still a tad too bitter. Anyhoo, I ran out of Four Roses, so it'll have to do. I'm thirsty, so it's ok.
BTW, why do the halftime show artists mostly suck at Superbowls? I mean, Cee Lo Green was proably the best in the past years, and he wasn't even the main artist.

The Smoke and Chartreuse sounds very good, though if I ever do it, it'll probably be with Laphroaig 10. Love me some Scotch cocktail.
BTW, I'm a little puzzled about the Blood & Sand at Le Lion. As mentioned before, they always served it to me without orange juice, which is a must in the standard recipe. I even asked if they added orange juice, and the one bartender (whom I respect, he's quite good.. others not so much) declined. Then I read a blog post by Jeffrey Morgenthaler from 08 or so where he posted abou the night he spent at Le Lion. He wrote about the Blood & Sand, which was refined by Gonçalo De Sousa Monteiro (a bartender that doesn't serve at Le Lion anymore, unfortunately). And yeah, he definitely mentions orange juice in it. Next time I'm at Le Lion, I'll inquire about it.
Edited by b1os - 2/3/13 at 5:23pm
post #11631 of 14149
During and pre-game:

Noble Ale Works "Mucky Muck" black lager.
Avery Brewing "New World Porter" american porter
Marin Brewing Co. "Mount Tam" pale ale
Ballast Point "Sculpin" IPA
Bear Republic "Cafe Racer 15" double IPA
Alesmith "My Bloody Valentine" amber/red ale
post #11632 of 14149
Gimlet
post #11633 of 14149
wow, this one is a keeper folks. was curious about cocktails that had Fernet Branca in it. came across this website:

http://www.kindredcocktails.com/cocktail/root-of-all-evil

Root of All Evil
Description
Bourbon, Orange liqueur, Maraschino Liqueur, Fernet Branca, Orange bitters, Orange peel
Ingredients
2 oz Bourbon
3⁄4 oz Grand Marnier
1⁄2 oz Fernet Branca
1⁄2 oz Maraschino Liqueur
2 ds Orange bitters, Regans' orange bitters
1 twst Orange peel (as garnish)
Instructions
Shake, strain, straight up, cocktail glass, garnish

made it exactly as above. one of the comments talked about dulling the sweetness with a 1/4 oz lemon juice so I did that as well.

freakin' great!

-Jeff

(and on a completely random note...how freakin' awesome is the pour spout on a bottle of Luxardo? love the control)
Edited by gamelan - 2/6/13 at 7:44pm
post #11634 of 14149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

What an irritating thing to say.

I think that a gentleman may, with all propriety, drink any cocktail he damned well pleases provided only that it does not include artificially-flavored anything (sorry, your favorite s'mores vodka is out). And likewise a lady.

The French 75 is one of the most storied of the classic cocktails, created by the legendary Harry MacElhone at the bar he presided over in Paris after the great Prohibition-induced diaspora of American bartending. It was named after the rather famous French 75mm howitzer, which was one of the most effective and modern pieces of field artillery used in WWI. The drink was popularized by its inclusion in the Savoy Cocktail book (written by another Harry, Harry Craddock), where it was noted that it (the drink) hit with the precision and weight of the gun for which it was named.

~ H

 

Fantastic. I now know what I'm going to be drinking tomorrow night.
post #11635 of 14149
Apple Brandy fallowed by Pierre Ferrand Cognac.
post #11636 of 14149
Opened my bottle of Dunkeld Atholl Brose. It is a scotch based liqueur made with honey, oats and herbs by Gordon and MacPhail.

I wish I was able to describe the nose on it, but the taste was redolent of honey, heather, might have been notes of thyme, the earthiness from the influence of the oats, and followed up by the smokey/peaty notes of the base scotch. Extremely tasty, although a touch sweet for my palette. A little will go a long way with this. All in all, glad I picked up the bottle.

I also recently bought a bottle of Mozart Dry. Normally wouldn't have, but it was on sale, and I'm a sucker for sales. As all Mozart products are, it is chocolate flavoured. However, it isn't a liqueur where a base spirit has been infused with chocolate. It is a spirit, where Mozart has figured out how to distill actual chocolate without burning it. It is clear, dry (no sweetness at all) with a wonderful heady chocolate aroma and taste. I am looking forward to using this in cocktails.
post #11637 of 14149
post #11638 of 14149

Black coffee with some kahlua.
 

post #11639 of 14149
post #11640 of 14149
Fillioux XO reserve. If you guys are cognac fans, this is worth a taste!
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