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What makes a good LinkedIn profile? - Page 2

post #16 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by reactmma View Post
*Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?
I get a call based on my profile an average of once a week. My current job came from an internal recruiter looking for someone with my skills. I am in a very hot area now too which helps. At partner level, most are true executive search firms. At more junior levels, you get more of a recruiter mix which is often not good for finding the best fit. There is less research and more volume orientation because placement fees correlate with candidate salary.
post #17 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post
I've heard that LinkedIn can be useful for more experienced workers but pretty useless for younger ones. Opinions?

I've found it to be helpful for staying in touch with my existing network, most of which are people i have met in person either through my job or more often through industry organizations. I don't find it very helpful for making new connections, especially if the potential connection is much my senior. In those cases I find it is much more effective to make contact via email or phone through an existing connection rather than solely through LinkedIn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reactmma View Post
*Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?

I was for the first time a few weeks back. I was surprised since my LinkedIn profile is fairly brief and in need of some fleshing out/search optimization. I work in an a niche area of commercial real estate which is already somewhat of a niche, so I am probably not representative. For what it's worth I am 26.
post #18 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPO89 View Post
Here is my summary:

Too cheesy? Too much? Critique me please.

Trying to be constructive here. I have worked in marketing for a long time and my suggestion would be to put paragraph 3 first and start with "I create need". Otherwise you are hoping the reader makes it through two paragraphs before getting to your value statement - which is a good one. So put your hard hitting value statement first and then back it up (work or projects that you have done, skills, etc).

I have been contacted by many recruiters and had many interview offers based on just my LinkedIn profile. Based on that experience, I think recommendations are OK, but your network is more important. Hiring managers are more likely to want to talk to someone they know, someone who knows someone they know (so they can get the reference from someone they trust anyway), or someone that obviously moves in similar industry circles. If you have no experience or little experience, really try and increase your network. Don't know anybody of value? Search for people that went graduated from your school in recent years that have a job in the area you are interested in. Hopefully they are mangers by now. Send them a short email through LinkedIn and tell them you are interested in that industry/area and you are looking for job opportunites and advice. If they are out of school less than 5 years they will probably be sympathetic and reply (80% chance). In a follow-up email (if they are in your area) ask them for an "informational interview". You don't expect them to hire you, you are just looking for information. They will probably decline - but you can thank them for the contact and ask them if you can link to them (you are doing all this via LinkedIn remember?). You will have Mr. Senior Manager in your network and all of their contacts will then be 2nd tier. You can gently exploit this network and build on it. LinkedIn connections are gold.

OK, now I am way off topic on how to conduct a job search, but note to job seekers with no experience. Managers see a million resumes and you need to stand out somehow. You have to be memorable, however modestly. If you don't have any experience, make some! Be an intern, a volunteer, do some kind of project, maybe with a group of friends. If you are looking for a job where the web matters you have no excuse for not somehow creating/publishing some kind of project that shows your skills and makes you "you know, that guy that correlated public transportation power outages to increased media downloads - I saw him on LinkedIn and sent you his resume".

Sorry if I derailed your thread, but I have a lot of sympathy for today's job seekers. LinkedIn can be a very powerful tool but you are the most effective weapon.
post #19 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by highball View Post
I've found it to be helpful for staying in touch with my existing network, most of which are people i have met in person either through my job or more often through industry organizations. I don't find it very helpful for making new connections, especially if the potential connection is much my senior. In those cases I find it is much more effective to make contact via email or phone through an existing connection rather than solely through LinkedIn.

I agree LinkedIn is going to be most effective in contacting otehr people within about 5 years of your own age. at least when you are starting out. If you do make a connection through LinkedIn you want to move it to a more direct form of communication ASAP.
post #20 of 52
I've been hit by recruiters as well. Enough that I've had good interviews thanks to them. No jobs yet. But I've definitely gained substantial name recognition in my industry in my city thanks to LI that I wouldn't have otherwise at all.
post #21 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPO89 View Post
Here is my summary:



Too cheesy? Too much? Critique me please.

For me it's way too long. We live in an age of bullet points. And the Blue Oceans thing was a bit over the top. But then again, I am a professional editor, so I am always looking to make things shorter. So I am probably not your target.
post #22 of 52
Stu is right, the original text was far too long. Recruiters and managers simply don't have the time.
post #23 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by reactmma View Post
*Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?

My "scholarly" (HA!) work has been published and as a result other firms in my field have cold-called me about it. Not a recruiter, but interesting to me.
post #24 of 52
Here's an odd question. Has anyone been recommended on LinkedIn by someone they have not done business with and don't have much of a relationship with? A while back I accepted a LI connection from a guy whom I have met a few times at industry events but don't know very well. He then proceeded to write a recommendation along the lines that he has known me for a long time, I always provided quality deliverables, and he will continue to do business with me. However, it's a complete lie, I have never worked with him and don't have any reason to in the foreseeable future.

I have hidden the recommendation from my profile but am wondering if there's a way to delete it entirely. Has this happened to anyone else?
post #25 of 52
^That's an odd one. Too much risk in keeping it around but I am not sure how you would delete one. I think it is pretty easy though. I have heard from some search guys that having at least a few recommendations is required from a credibility standpoint. Most people are happy to oblige.
post #26 of 52
I've looked through all of the controls within LinkedIn and there doesn't seem to be an option to outright delete it from my end, only hide it from public view. I have considered emailing the guy and asking him to remove it, but since he obviously is not very professional I'm not sure I want to risk dealing with him. Perhaps I will email the LinkedIn help desk to see if they can remove it.

Currently working on getting rec's from a former boss and clients and perhaps a peer/colleague at my current firm. Any thoughts on other avenues for gaining recommendations for someone who is younger and has not worked on too many projects/clients thus far?
post #27 of 52
Best to request recommendations at the end of a project when you have done solid work.
post #28 of 52
Thanks for the help guys
post #29 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by reactmma View Post
*Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?

Yes, almost weekly. For the most part, these are boutique or local/regional recruiters, but provided they are retained firms I'll explore options. To get on the board with a global player (e.g. Heidrick & Struggles, Russell Reynolds, etc.), it's best to be introduced from someone already within their network.
post #30 of 52
Just for shits & giggles, here's my summary:

13 years delivering exceptional results in technology & healthcare across four continents. Developed advanced capabilities in general management, sales & marketing strategy, product development, product marketing and market development in entrepreneurial and Fortune 500 environments. Successfully created and managed new revenue opportunities, recruited and developed international, multi-functional teams, raised equity financing, and collaborated with KOLs in electrophysiology, cardiology & advanced wound healing.

Rip 'er up, boys!
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