or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › The Official Hair Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Hair Thread - Page 89

post #1321 of 1358

Hey Folks. So I am getting a hair system, it is like the virtual reality system, but is more dense - folligraft. It is a membrane system so it is almost invisible. I have been bald for so long I am not sure where to go with hair Styles. I am uploading a picture of myself in the hopes you guys can tell me what shape face I have and what hair style might suit me...please help.

 

What shape do I have? Any ideas for styles?

 

THANK YOU.

 

 

post #1322 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkI View Post

Elaborate?

A lot of interesting chemistry going on in high quality salon products.
post #1323 of 1358

Can anyone recommend a good men's shampoo? I'm looking for one without all the crap ingredients like sodium laureth sulfate. I don't think I want silicone in it, either. At the store, they all seem to have the exact same things in them. Thanks! icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

post #1324 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by noface0711 View Post

Can anyone recommend a good men's shampoo? I'm looking for one without all the crap ingredients like sodium laureth sulfate. I don't think I want silicone in it, either. At the store, they all seem to have the exact same things in them. Thanks! icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Free&Clear awesome shampoo and conditioner. You can usually find it at Walgreens, the manufacturers website is below.
https://www.psico.com/product/free-and-clear-shampoo/
post #1325 of 1358

Thinking about getting a side part pompadour type of look. 

 

Anyone else out there currently rocking this style? Any recommendations on styling techniques or products?

post #1326 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by StillFly View Post

Thinking about getting a side part pompadour type of look. 

Anyone else out there currently rocking this style? Any recommendations on styling techniques or products?

I rock a side pomp/detached undercut hybrid and I use lush dirty and Baxter clay pomade. But everyone's hair is different.


I need a hair cut though it's far too long on the top currently. Goes down to my chin and when it's up/back it hits 3/4 of the way back of my head.
post #1327 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by StillFly View Post
 

Thinking about getting a side part pompadour type of look. 

 

Anyone else out there currently rocking this style? Any recommendations on styling techniques or products?

 

I did a side part undercut pomp recently when my hair had gotten long, and I found I got the best results if I put product in my hair while it was still wet, then part it and blow dry into the general shape I wanted, and then adding only a small amount more wax or pomade after. My hair is very thin so if I blow dry without products, it just falls flat again.

post #1328 of 1358

Any good product recommendations for shoulder length thick hair? My gf likes mine this length but idk how to up keep lol

post #1329 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by MWood View Post
 

Any good product recommendations for shoulder length thick hair? My gf likes mine this length but idk how to up keep lol

Ask her?

post #1330 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

Ask her?

Funny thing is she has shorter hair than me lol 

post #1331 of 1358

Can someone help me out? I've been having a hard time trying to figure out what to do with my hair. Don't have a camera, but here's a picture of someone with a kind of similar face, except I have almost blond hair, really bad skin (working on that) and more fat on mine (also working on it).

 

http://www.b4men.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Coupe-november.-Foto-Jamie-Bowden.jpg

 

What face shape is that, and what kind of cuts/styles would go with it?

post #1332 of 1358
I've done a fair amount of researching the chemistry behind shampoos, conditioners, and other styling products. It is very interesting stuff. All of the hate of detergents, or certain surfactants in shampoos are largely unfounded. Below I will disclose, at its most basic level the different ingredients in shampoos and conditioners, which make them effective.

The active ingredients in shampoo is some form of detergent to emulsify oil and dirt so it can be washed away from the hair. The anti-sulphate phenomenon is responsible for shunning of Sodium laureth sulfate, or "SLES". Sulphates are used in shampoos not because they are cheaper, or any of those evil rumors that you hear of, but rather because they are extremely effective. Some people have certain reactions to them if they are not rinsed well and remain on the skin, but from what I understand those people are few and far between. All detergents are not made equally, however. An example of a less "harsh" detergent would be sodium lauryl sulfate, or "SLS". Some supposedly "sulphate free" detergents might include sodium cocoyl sulfate, which is used to trick folks who don't like to see the words "laurel", or "laureth" in their shampoo, but it is very, very similar to sodium lauryl sulphate.

Some other premium detergents that are very mild for hair include Sodium Lauroyl Methyl Isethionate, Dosodium Laureth Sulfosuccinate, and Sodium Laurel Sarcosinate and sodium isethionate.

Along with the detergent in shampoos there will be a melange of other conditioners that deposit on the hair. These conditioners can be silicones, proteins, or Polyquaterniums. Silicones are meant to coat the hair and offer shine, protection, manageability. Most silicones are non-polar and hydrophobic, meaning they don't have an electrical charge and they repel water. They are generally suspended in an emulsion that when you rinse your hair the silicone gets deposited on the hair shaft and repels the water (because it is hydrophobic) this is called "dilution deposition".

Some silicones can be formulated with a charge that sticks to hair, however. The silicones that have a change, like the polyquaterniums work well as conditioners because they carry a positive electrical charge that is attracted to the hair's negative electrical charge. When in the presence of each other they hydrogen bond together. Damaged parts of the hair that has some of the hair's core exposed are even more negatively charged than the cuticle so these types of conditioners do a great job of attracting themselves to the hair and providing slip, and anti-static properties.

Examples of some silicones include, Amodimethicone, Dimethicone, Dimethiconol, Cyclopentasiloxane.
Examples of cationic conditioners include: Polyquaterniums, Benentrimonium Chloride, Cetrimonium Chloride

Generally, Polyquaterniums will have a number after it. The number is only the order in which it was formulated so it doesn't tell you anything about its behavior, unfortunately. All Polyquaterniums have slightly different properties.


If anybody has any direct questions about product ingredients I think I could be a good resource as I have developed a keen interest in cosmetic chemistry.

Your friend,
patrickBOOTH
post #1333 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've done a fair amount of researching the chemistry behind shampoos, conditioners, and other styling products. It is very interesting stuff. All of the hate of detergents, or certain surfactants in shampoos are largely unfounded. Below I will disclose, at its most basic level the different ingredients in shampoos and conditioners, which make them effective.

The active ingredients in shampoo is some form of detergent to emulsify oil and dirt so it can be washed away from the hair. The anti-sulphate phenomenon is responsible for shunning of Sodium laureth sulfate, or "SLES". Sulphates are used in shampoos not because they are cheaper, or any of those evil rumors that you hear of, but rather because they are extremely effective. Some people have certain reactions to them if they are not rinsed well and remain on the skin, but from what I understand those people are few and far between. All detergents are not made equally, however. An example of a less "harsh" detergent would be sodium lauryl sulfate, or "SLS". Some supposedly "sulphate free" detergents might include sodium cocoyl sulfate, which is used to trick folks who don't like to see the words "laurel", or "laureth" in their shampoo, but it is very, very similar to sodium lauryl sulphate.

Some other premium detergents that are very mild for hair include Sodium Lauroyl Methyl Isethionate, Dosodium Laureth Sulfosuccinate, and Sodium Laurel Sarcosinate and sodium isethionate.

Along with the detergent in shampoos there will be a melange of other conditioners that deposit on the hair. These conditioners can be silicones, proteins, or Polyquaterniums. Silicones are meant to coat the hair and offer shine, protection, manageability. Most silicones are non-polar and hydrophobic, meaning they don't have an electrical charge and they repel water. They are generally suspended in an emulsion that when you rinse your hair the silicone gets deposited on the hair shaft and repels the water (because it is hydrophobic) this is called "dilution deposition".

Some silicones can be formulated with a charge that sticks to hair, however. The silicones that have a change, like the polyquaterniums work well as conditioners because they carry a positive electrical charge that is attracted to the hair's negative electrical charge. When in the presence of each other they hydrogen bond together. Damaged parts of the hair that has some of the hair's core exposed are even more negatively charged than the cuticle so these types of conditioners do a great job of attracting themselves to the hair and providing slip, and anti-static properties.

Examples of some silicones include, Amodimethicone, Dimethicone, Dimethiconol, Cyclopentasiloxane.
Examples of cationic conditioners include: Polyquaterniums, Benentrimonium Chloride, Cetrimonium Chloride

Generally, Polyquaterniums will have a number after it. The number is only the order in which it was formulated so it doesn't tell you anything about its behavior, unfortunately. All Polyquaterniums have slightly different properties.


If anybody has any direct questions about product ingredients I think I could be a good resource as I have developed a keen interest in cosmetic chemistry.

Your friend,
patrickBOOTH

Whats your opinion on the No shampoo methods out there? I did the whole baking soda and ACV thing for a while and I felt my hair was pretty healthy and clean, and I only had to wash it every couple of weeks really. Switched to conditioner (non-reisude I think) only for convenience and I've found my scalp gets a bit itchy pretty soon and have had the odd problem with dandruff which goes away with normal shampoo. I've got kinda wavy hair if that makes a difference.

Would be good to get some scientific opinion from someone who's not biased towards any method
post #1334 of 1358
Well, I know for a fact that some testing has been done on apple cider vinegar and its ability to clean. A recent study I heard about on a podcast showed that apple cider vinegar pretty much does nothing in terms of removal of styling products, or dirt, oil, and the like. Baking soda is not great for hair because it has a high pH relative to where your hair wants to be. Your hair wants to be acidic at a pH of about 5.5 and baking soda is around 9. Alkalinity opens up the hair's cuticle and makes it frizzy and makes it prone to breakage (this is why most shaving creams are highly alkaline, makes cutting the hair easier). The only thing the apple cider vinegar is helpful for in this case is bringing the pH down and smoothing the cuticle of the hair. Also, the low pH is helpful to remove any mineral deposits that hard water might impart on your hair, but not any more than using a chelating shampoo would. Also, if you have hard water and use baking soda you're creating an environment for more mineral buildup, so you're effectively creating mineral build up and then rinsing it away all while not really cleaning your hair and potentially causing breakage from opening the cuticle AND the the physically aggressive properties baking soda.

I think you might be benefiting from the apple cider vinegar because the acid is causing your scalp to turn over cells at a faster rate. You might benefit from Neutrogena T/Sal shampoo, which has 3% Salicylic Acid, which does the same thing and is much better for your hair, while having anti-inflammatory effects (salicylic acid is what gives aspirin its anti-inflammatory properties).

Like you, I tried these kinds of more natural regiments and found it make my scalp, much more fickle. After using simple shampoo/condition regiments with more gentle detergents like I mentioned above I haven't experienced any dandruff like I used to.

I hope this helps.
post #1335 of 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've done a fair amount of researching the chemistry behind shampoos, conditioners, and other styling products. It is very interesting stuff. All of the hate of detergents, or certain surfactants in shampoos are largely unfounded. Below I will disclose, at its most basic level the different ingredients in shampoos and conditioners, which make them effective.

The active ingredients in shampoo is some form of detergent to emulsify oil and dirt so it can be washed away from the hair. The anti-sulphate phenomenon is responsible for shunning of Sodium laureth sulfate, or "SLES". Sulphates are used in shampoos not because they are cheaper, or any of those evil rumors that you hear of, but rather because they are extremely effective. Some people have certain reactions to them if they are not rinsed well and remain on the skin, but from what I understand those people are few and far between. All detergents are not made equally, however. An example of a less "harsh" detergent would be sodium lauryl sulfate, or "SLS". Some supposedly "sulphate free" detergents might include sodium cocoyl sulfate, which is used to trick folks who don't like to see the words "laurel", or "laureth" in their shampoo, but it is very, very similar to sodium lauryl sulphate.

Some other premium detergents that are very mild for hair include Sodium Lauroyl Methyl Isethionate, Dosodium Laureth Sulfosuccinate, and Sodium Laurel Sarcosinate and sodium isethionate.

Along with the detergent in shampoos there will be a melange of other conditioners that deposit on the hair. These conditioners can be silicones, proteins, or Polyquaterniums. Silicones are meant to coat the hair and offer shine, protection, manageability. Most silicones are non-polar and hydrophobic, meaning they don't have an electrical charge and they repel water. They are generally suspended in an emulsion that when you rinse your hair the silicone gets deposited on the hair shaft and repels the water (because it is hydrophobic) this is called "dilution deposition".

Some silicones can be formulated with a charge that sticks to hair, however. The silicones that have a change, like the polyquaterniums work well as conditioners because they carry a positive electrical charge that is attracted to the hair's negative electrical charge. When in the presence of each other they hydrogen bond together. Damaged parts of the hair that has some of the hair's core exposed are even more negatively charged than the cuticle so these types of conditioners do a great job of attracting themselves to the hair and providing slip, and anti-static properties.

Examples of some silicones include, Amodimethicone, Dimethicone, Dimethiconol, Cyclopentasiloxane.
Examples of cationic conditioners include: Polyquaterniums, Benentrimonium Chloride, Cetrimonium Chloride

Generally, Polyquaterniums will have a number after it. The number is only the order in which it was formulated so it doesn't tell you anything about its behavior, unfortunately. All Polyquaterniums have slightly different properties.


If anybody has any direct questions about product ingredients I think I could be a good resource as I have developed a keen interest in cosmetic chemistry.

Your friend,
patrickBOOTH

Good stuff. Have you listened to the Beauty Brains podcast or checked out their forum? They were chemists for companies that made shampoos, conditioners, etc. and they talk about the myths and realities of a lot of the products in the beauty industries.

Also, IIRC, they mention that the whole alkalinity thing is apparently a myth except if you're going to the ends of the pH scale.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Health & Body
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › The Official Hair Thread