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Beginnings of a Charvet Habit.... - Page 7

post #91 of 116
My NSM shirt is made from Riva and feels pretty robust to me. I don't use it too often because it has a very high and spread collar and works best for me only when I want a certain look. Most days I wear a more muted collar.
post #92 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Thanks for the review. I was in Charvet last fall and decided to get demi-measure because I didn't know when I was going to return. I searched for fabrics with lots of body and they turned out to be their least expensive fabrics. Their English linen was just a touch under 400 euros. There were some issues that were unfixable with 1/2 measure, like position of the armholes. I like the density of the collar and cuff, but the shape of the collar is not as nice as the ones I get from CEGO.
I got into a debate with the tailor about the cuff size because I didn't know how much to account for shrinkage even if they did wash cloth before cutting. So I got 2 buttons to account for shrinkage and I can just cut off the button I don't use. Now that I have washed it a few times, it turns out the tailor was right.
Is the top a chambray? I was thinking about including a voile but was advised to wait and make it up as a later order.

This is what I made up.


That shirt on the right is beautiful. Looks like Godard's chambray. Do you know who the fabric is from?
post #93 of 116
English linen. Quite different from the SG chambray which I also have.
post #94 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

English linen. Quite different from the SG chambray which I also have.

Ah. Which do you prefer? The English linen or the chambray?
post #95 of 116
Haven't worn the linen yet. Have to wait till the weather warms up.
post #96 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Haven't worn the linen yet. Have to wait till the weather warms up.

If you have 2 shirts and you've only worn one, I think that means you aren't qualified to express a view on durability.
post #97 of 116
Well I've worn that one through several wash cycles which is more, it seems, than your red shirt.

I can't comment on the durability of the linen, that is true.
post #98 of 116
that is just silly. a shirt lasting through several wash cycles tells you nothing as it is simply what is expected. a shirt not lasting through a single wash cycle tells you something precisely because of how extreme a scenario it is. right? either way, simply as a matter of numbers and experience, you and i are in very different places. in any event, you can comment on anything you want. i'm just saying that you don't have the experience to add anything of value on this point.
post #99 of 116
Thought I'd revive this thread. Just ordered a full bespoke shirt this past December (a month ago). Must return to Paris for a fitting. The staff is extremely friendly and the shirtmaker made me feel I was in good hands. I haven't come across a shirtmaker as attentive to detail since Anna Matuozzo.

They are cutting me two separate collars to try on: a typical Italian-style spread, and a "surprise" collar the shirtmaker thinks would be flattering. I have yet to pick fabrics.

On Riva: Poorsood, I don't see how you can judge the robustness of a shirting just by feeling it or washing it a few times. This issue came up a year or two ago when I mentioned that all my Riva shirts began rapidly disintegrating after 15-20 washings. A dozen people crawled out of the woodwork to contest my experience, each of whom owned just a few Riva shirts. In contrast, my entire shirt wardrobe (other than OCBDs) is Riva and I wear mine regularly. There is no getting around it: the stuff is delicate, and hence, very pricey. Both Battistoni and Anna Matuozzo warned me about Riva being fragile. I didn't listen and assumed things would be okay if I was extra careful. I should have listened.
post #100 of 116
I think rough thick fabrics tend to last longer than the smooth luxurious feeling fabrics. For example, my cheap oxford cloth shirts still look great after hard use. At Charvet I purposefully chose coarser and thicker fabric. The blue cotton I have is maybe 100s at best. Their fabric is unlabeled so it is a guess. The salesperson I was with couldn't tell me much about the different fabrics.

Did you see Cromptons recent interview of Mr Colban? It's quite interesting.
post #101 of 116
I think I may just tell them to use a specific shirting, such as Alumo Soyella. That way I know what I'm getting and can order dozens of the exact same.

I met Colban at the shop. Didn't speak very much with him, though. Will look for the interview.
post #102 of 116
I would have liked to speak with Mr Colban. He seems very knowledgable. They source their own fabrics right now to the cotton.
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Here is Simon Cromptons interview with Mr. Colban. It seems they source fabric to their own specifications.

http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2013/12/interview-jean-claude-colban-charvet.html#.UsYW62t5mSM

I found his discussion of the different shades of white interesting. I didn't look at the selection of white the last time I was there but I am curious to look again. I also like the absence of finishing on the cloth. I prefer to have cloth that becomes softer with wear rather than is softened by finishing.
post #103 of 116
By the sounds of it, they are only spec'ing their own basic white shirtings, not others.
post #104 of 116
^ Foo: no Geneva?
post #105 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

By the sounds of it, they are only spec'ing their own basic white shirtings, not others.

Consider asking when you return for your fitting. I'd be curious to know what you discover.
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