or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Beginnings of a Charvet Habit....
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beginnings of a Charvet Habit.... - Page 5

post #61 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantisocrat View Post
I have few Charvet RTWs. I can't tell any difference between them and other quality makers. This is true for ties, trousers, and other accessories. I think the name is important for many people here.

For ties, Hermes and Stephano Ricci , the silks are better than most
post #62 of 116
Thread Starter 
So my shirt and tie were finally delivered (my sister will be bringing it to me this weekend!!!) In the meantime, here are some pics of me during my experience.....can't wait to go back again.
LL
LL
LL
LL
LL
post #63 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldknots View Post
So my shirt and tie were finally delivered (my sister will be bringing it to me this weekend!!!) In the meantime, here are some pics of me during my experience.....can't wait to go back again.
I miss that room
post #64 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldknots View Post
So my shirt and tie were finally delivered (my sister will be bringing it to me this weekend!!!) In the meantime, here are some pics of me during my experience.....can't wait to go back again.

how the hell did you get in?
post #65 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebernardthomas View Post
how the hell did you get in?

He pushed, not pulled.
post #66 of 116
Petite inquiry into the sequence of events: Did you agree to marry this young lady before or after she bought you a Charvet shirt? I ask because, had a woman agreed to buy me a Charvet shirt, I would surely have consented to marriage. What's more, if I had consented to marriage prior to the purchase, I would be doubly elated, certain I'd made the correct decision, based on the excellent taste of my future wife. In either case, for both the engagement and the acquisition of the shirt, congratulations are in order. My sincere hope is that you will receive a single Charvet shirt from your wife for each anniversary for the next 50 years.

http://lordbyronsrevenge.blogspot.com/
post #67 of 116
My most recent selection of full mesure shirts from last week, as well as an older picture from my original pattern, where you can see that the tailor has adjusted one side of the collar to make it more appropriate for the shape of my face:
LL
LL
post #68 of 116
and some additional close-ups of some of the fabrics I selected...
LL
post #69 of 116
Thread Starter 
Lord Byron, I proposed the evening before outside the restaurant at the Eiffel Tower! Thank you for the well wishes!
post #70 of 116

My wife bought me my first Charvet shirt recently as an anniversary present. It was a dream come true, as I had been talking about owning one for a few years. I have yet to wear it, but just trying it on to make sure the size was right made me feel like a million bucks. I plan to launder it myself. There are a few things in my wardrobe I just don't trust to anyone except me.
 

post #71 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by petitnoblesse View Post

The customs duty on my Charvet were painful, it added about 20% to the price of the shirt if I recall correctly, it's been a few years.


Marc

One hopes, for civilizations sake, that such issues will be dealt with in the free trade agreement.
post #72 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

For the full measure, prices are based on the fabric selection. I've never purchased a shirt at the first (lowest) tier, but the second tier is 400 euros. Many of the fabrics on the second floor are unique to Charvet. If you like patterns that are a little bolder and you aren't just looking for white or blue, it is really a lot of fun to pick shirts (and going through the whites and blues is also nice).


As for the delicacy of the products, I've never found either the ties or shorts to wear poorly. Personally, I think that the off the rack shirts that I can purchase in NYC are relatively unflattering (extremely loose fitting; too long in the tail) and generally not worth the price. However, the full measure experience is totally different and, in my humble opinion, worth every penny. The options are generally limited only by your imagination (they offer approximately 40 collars, but each option can be adjusted in any way that you wish; same goes for cuffs).


You have to have a lot of patience to go through with the full measure, particularly if you don't live in Paris. I live in New York and it took four visits (first visit involved approximately 40 measurements plus selection of various details and fabric selections; second visit is a baste fitting with a white poplin shirt and various modifications in advance of receipt of my first shirt; third visit (which came only after I had worn and washed my first shirt 5 times at Charvet's request) was for me to comment on my happiness with the shirt; fourth visit was the same process as the third visit reflecting various tweaks). For all of that, Charvet charged 400 euros with no guarantee of receiving a second order. While I recognize that 400 euros is a great deal to spend on a shirt, I think it was worth every penny.

Thanks for the review. I was in Charvet last fall and decided to get demi-measure because I didn't know when I was going to return. I searched for fabrics with lots of body and they turned out to be their least expensive fabrics. Their English linen was just a touch under 400 euros. There were some issues that were unfixable with 1/2 measure, like position of the armholes. I like the density of the collar and cuff, but the shape of the collar is not as nice as the ones I get from CEGO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post


Quote:


Originally Posted by goldknots View Post

... with double button barrel cuffs


wtf, this is moron status

I got into a debate with the tailor about the cuff size because I didn't know how much to account for shrinkage even if they did wash cloth before cutting. So I got 2 buttons to account for shrinkage and I can just cut off the button I don't use. Now that I have washed it a few times, it turns out the tailor was right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

and some additional close-ups of some of the fabrics I selected...
LL

Is the top a chambray? I was thinking about including a voile but was advised to wait and make it up as a later order.

This is what I made up.

post #73 of 116
The top shirt is actually a wool/cotton blend that is fairly heavy (and great) but can only be worn in the coldest months in NYC. I completely agree on the collar. The fused collar that Charvet uses was, for me, the only negative to the full mesure program that couldn't be overcome. I thought there were some real pluses, and too many minuses, the most serious of which was that collar.
post #74 of 116
I'm surprised there were issues that they couldn't fully resolve. One of the reasons for me to try Charvet was to see if I can learn something. I was trying to learn if there were certain details that I liked and could get CEGO to copy. It is much easier for me to make something local than from a far. Another detail I like is the way they do the skirt. Their hand sown and shanked buttons are very tight.

Was it the shape or the stiffness of their collar that you didn't like?
post #75 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

I'm surprised there were issues that they couldn't fully resolve. One of the reasons for me to try Charvet was to see if I can learn something. I was trying to learn if there were certain details that I liked and could get CEGO to copy. It is much easier for me to make something local than from a far. Another detail I like is the way they do the skirt. Their hand sown and shanked buttons are very tight.

Was it the shape or the stiffness of their collar that you didn't like?


Well, those button shanks are the only hand sewing on the entire shirt. One can debate whether that makes a difference, but if you are interested in hand-sewing, then charvet is undoubtedly the wrong choice. On the collars, Charvet collars are patch fused (not to the fabric of the collar, but to another piece of the lining of the collar). Some people like the stiffness that this creates. I prefer not to have it. Again, that is just a personal choice. As to whether there are issues that they can't fully resolve, the distance is, for me, an issue. I'm in Paris at least three times a year and I still found it hard to get to something I was truly happy with. However, if I lived down the street, I believe that would change. The final issue that they won't resolve, and have no interest in resolving, is durability. These are not shirts that are made for a long life of hard living (and by hard living, I mean twice-a-month wear). If your charvet shirt falls apart after two or three wears, then you get a new shirt, no questions asked. If it falls apart after 5 or 6 wears, well, you have a charvet shirt.

That being said, there are great things about charvet. I'm nobody special, and while I'm fortunate enough to be able to indulge this ludicrous habit, the people at Charvet couldn't have known that when I first walked in. Nonetheless, they treat me like the most important customer they've ever had, and I've order fewer than 20 shirts. The fabric selection is amazing in terms of color and pattern (although they only cover the pieces of the spectrum that run from extremely delicate to incredibly delicate) and the shopping experience is truly memorable. If I needed a tuxedo shirt, or something incredibly form fitting for a particular occasion, I would use charvet. As you note, the length of the shirts (it will seem like a nightgown if you are used to anything else) is appropriate and makes almost everything else seem inadequate.

A lot of my issues most likely seem like hair splitting. If you are playing in that space and can afford those shirts, durability may not be a concern. I'd pay for the process just to be able to explore the shop at place vendome. But in my view, the end product isn't better than what you can get in many places around the globe. By the way, don't sleep on their ability to make suits. Take the elevator up and there is a world that generally isn't discussed but is quite wonderful.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Beginnings of a Charvet Habit....