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Beginnings of a Charvet Habit.... - Page 4

post #46 of 116
Thread Starter 
Eustace, you are right, it was the MTM option. I didn't even want to know the full custom price!

Thank you!

Concordia, do you have to pay to receive the fabric book?
post #47 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldknots View Post
HHD, was it a one button Herringbone blazer and brown suede boots? If so, nice blazer!

Thank you for the compliment.

It was double-breasted, quite a large herringbone pattern. And yes, the Styleforum standard issue C&J brown suede Tetburys.

Small world!
post #48 of 116
the swatches are complimentary...

the 2nd # that they write on the label of each swatch refers to the category of the fabric (higher # = finer fabric = more$).
post #49 of 116
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HHD View Post
It was double-breasted, quite a large herringbone pattern. And yes, the Styleforum standard issue C&J brown suede Tetburys.

Small world!
Hmm, guess I didn't look hard enough at the blazer, LOL. Yes, I also had on my brown suede Tetburys. Small world indeed!
post #50 of 116
For the full measure, prices are based on the fabric selection. I've never purchased a shirt at the first (lowest) tier, but the second tier is 400 euros. Many of the fabrics on the second floor are unique to Charvet. If you like patterns that are a little bolder and you aren't just looking for white or blue, it is really a lot of fun to pick shirts (and going through the whites and blues is also nice).

As for the delicacy of the products, I've never found either the ties or shorts to wear poorly. Personally, I think that the off the rack shirts that I can purchase in NYC are relatively unflattering (extremely loose fitting; too long in the tail) and generally not worth the price. However, the full measure experience is totally different and, in my humble opinion, worth every penny. The options are generally limited only by your imagination (they offer approximately 40 collars, but each option can be adjusted in any way that you wish; same goes for cuffs).

You have to have a lot of patience to go through with the full measure, particularly if you don't live in Paris. I live in New York and it took four visits (first visit involved approximately 40 measurements plus selection of various details and fabric selections; second visit is a baste fitting with a white poplin shirt and various modifications in advance of receipt of my first shirt; third visit (which came only after I had worn and washed my first shirt 5 times at Charvet's request) was for me to comment on my happiness with the shirt; fourth visit was the same process as the third visit reflecting various tweaks). For all of that, Charvet charged 400 euros with no guarantee of receiving a second order. While I recognize that 400 euros is a great deal to spend on a shirt, I think it was worth every penny.
post #51 of 116
I have few Charvet RTWs. I can't tell any difference between them and other quality makers. This is true for ties, trousers, and other accessories. I think the name is important for many people here.
post #52 of 116
WTF! So, how many of you guys are cold-water washing your shirts and ironing them at home? Do you guys just do this process for a select few brands of shirts, or all of them?

I've felt Charvet shirts and tried on a couple of RTW ones, but I did not notice anything about them that would out-weigh the inconvenience of this type of care, nor do I find the compatibility of Charvet's quality with its supposed fragility.
post #53 of 116
The only thing on the Charvet shirt I see that needs any kind of special care is the collar and cuffs, which aren't fused. So they need to be ironed carefully to look nice. The shirt is otherwise as tough as the fabric allows it to be.
post #54 of 116
^i wash all my cotton shirts at home; normal cycle/warm water....

i don't find it inconvenient, nor do this because I think the shirts are precious/handle with care (i actually prefer my shirts broken in)

only do it because: (i) the average commerical laundry use that stupid machine which crushes the collar (then I have to iron again) and breaks the buttons; (ii) am too lazy to find a good commerical laundry/go every time; and (iii) prefer not to pay for something I can easily do myself (like clean/polish my shoes)...
post #55 of 116
I see.
post #56 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldknots View Post
Eustace, you are right, it was the MTM option. I didn't even want to know the full custom price!

Thank you!

Concordia, do you have to pay to receive the fabric book?

In the past, I've described and requested several swatches at a time without problem. Alternatively, one can visit BG peruse and record their shirt swatch codes then contact Paris. Note: BG sales associates my become a bit suspicious if you're cruising their fabrics regularly ...
post #57 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by tj100 View Post
Who/where?

French Cleaners. There's one in South End, but I go to the one on Dartmouth across from Back Bay Station. Just be sure to ask for in-house laundry. If you don't, they might send it out for the usual $1.25 or so.
post #58 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldknots View Post
... with double button barrel cuffs
wtf, this is moron status
post #59 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post
For the full measure, prices are based on the fabric selection. I've never purchased a shirt at the first (lowest) tier, but the second tier is 400 euros. Many of the fabrics on the second floor are unique to Charvet. If you like patterns that are a little bolder and you aren't just looking for white or blue, it is really a lot of fun to pick shirts (and going through the whites and blues is also nice).

As for the delicacy of the products, I've never found either the ties or shorts to wear poorly. Personally, I think that the off the rack shirts that I can purchase in NYC are relatively unflattering (extremely loose fitting; too long in the tail) and generally not worth the price. However, the full measure experience is totally different and, in my humble opinion, worth every penny. The options are generally limited only by your imagination (they offer approximately 40 collars, but each option can be adjusted in any way that you wish; same goes for cuffs).

You have to have a lot of patience to go through with the full measure, particularly if you don't live in Paris. I live in New York and it took four visits (first visit involved approximately 40 measurements plus selection of various details and fabric selections; second visit is a baste fitting with a white poplin shirt and various modifications in advance of receipt of my first shirt; third visit (which came only after I had worn and washed my first shirt 5 times at Charvet's request) was for me to comment on my happiness with the shirt; fourth visit was the same process as the third visit reflecting various tweaks). For all of that, Charvet charged 400 euros with no guarantee of receiving a second order. While I recognize that 400 euros is a great deal to spend on a shirt, I think it was worth every penny.

Thanks for the review.
post #60 of 116
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
wtf, this is moron status
We all get to be a moron sometime in our lives, guess this was my chance.....
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