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Monsieur - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123
He looks like he's wearing a toupe. EDIT - Luc-Emmanuel and I had the exact same thought, only an ocean away.
post #17 of 28
All pics hideous (except B at T). Soft spot for that movie.
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
All pics hideous (except B at T). Soft spot for that movie.

Hepburn looks timeless but the men's suits in that film are too tight looking and boardering on ridiculous. Feel free to disagree however - maybe I'm missing something? I assume this is the Pierre Cardin influence coming through?
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by epa
Do you not find the side pockets a bit "inclined"? I believe to recall that I read in a thread that inclined pockets only were acceptable for some sport-coats. There was a specific term for such pockets, I believe. Maybe I am wrong, what do you think?
(I just became a bit worried, because I just found that the suit that I am wearing today has inclined pockets, but the inclination is substantially less than in the photo, I would say roughly 30 degrees with respect to the horizontal plane).

Yes hacking pockets on a DB coat are truly bizarre. It is more acceptable on a SB coat for a suit although purists might insist that they only be put on a sport jacket - a "hacking jacket".
post #20 of 28
I find the photographs strangely disquieting on an almost visceral level.
post #21 of 28
That said the suit is a mess, like its suffering from schizophrenia.
I will say however that Monsieur is the last bastion in print for good dressers even if leans towards the effete - which is a Parisian invention perhaps.
Bottom line is Francois Jean's heart is in the right place even if his lapels - and his tailors eye - aren't.
post #22 of 28
I meant Monsieur is the last Bastion in Paris not worldwide. Then we would be truly ed......
post #23 of 28
This man has posture problems. He needs to work on that. Audrey Hepburn was dressed in that film, by Hubert de Givenchy. One of the final, grand couturiers. Givenchy believed strongly in flou, and used it to great advantage, on Ms. Hepburn's skeletal frame.
post #24 of 28
No, actually, I think the whole image is perfect. Well, not perfect by ...aesthetic standards, or classic modes of dress, but perfect for his objective. He didn't name his publication "The well-dressed Monseur", for starters, so holding him to "standards" is rather unfair.

But, since he is a publisher, his first aim and objective is to garner publicity, and if you subscribe to the idea that a well-dressed man's appearance shouldn't invite comments, then he should not be well-dressed. He should be provocative, however, and I would submit that he has accomplished his goal.

Never mind that those who know better might think that the suit would look better if it were turned inside-out and draped over his shaggy coiffure.
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 
Would you call him "an advanced dresser" a la Stephen di Renza and Yann Debelle de Montby?

Or is he merely advancing into something else?
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drax
That said the suit is a mess, like its suffering from schizophrenia.
I will say however that Monsieur is the last bastion in print for good dressers even if leans towards the effete - which is a Parisian invention perhaps.
Bottom line is Francois Jean's heart is in the right place even if his lapels - and his tailors eye - aren't.
The latest Arnys catalog can be termed somewhat effete or at least in the American sense.
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
3500 euros starting price for his suits?! That's more than Charvet and most of Savile Row! The site states that the suits are styled in the English manner (!)... then that Djay is specialized in the French style... then that Djay has "only one master: Caraceni" (which one of the four Caraceni, I wonder?)... LabelLynde, you're just stirring the pot by showing pictures of M. Daehn's latest miscarriage.
Have you been to Camps Deluca, Max Evezline, and Gabriel Gonzalez? Cifonelli Paris also used to produce a quality garment but like most men's firms--notably Lanvin's chemisiers---they've become inferior with subcontractors like Nervesa Moda Uomo. De Luca and Bardot were the other tailors of the "old school". Add the cordwainers of Pinet, luggage by Moynat, Hermes by Dupre-Lafon stationary, and some smoking accessories by Dunhill de Paris and it's all quite stylish in that nostalgic sort of way.
post #28 of 28
the shoes are edward green
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