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Blazer too short after having it altered? - Page 2

post #16 of 34
It may help to tuck in the pocket flaps and send us a new photo. This may correct the asthetics.
post #17 of 34
i think if you slimmed the jacket it would be alright seeing as right now the silhouette is quite boxy.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by oaw01 View Post
Looks like a Hickey Freeman jacket that wants to be a Prada. I'd toss it. However, for the regular population most won't even notice or care.

+1

The short length doesn't work with an otherwise traditional looking jacket. I wouldn't wear it, even if 90% of the population wouldn't notice it I wouldn't want to wear something that I didn't think looked right.
post #19 of 34
Another +1. Although I'm 99% sure 90% of the population wouldn't even notice or care.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by oaw01 View Post
Looks like a Hickey Freeman jacket that wants to be a Prada.
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexanduh View Post
i think if you slimmed the jacket it would be alright seeing as right now the silhouette is quite boxy.
exactly. the proportions have been somewhat thrown off, but they can also be somewhat rescued if you pulled it in a bit. but, proceed with caution, lest you end up with a HF that wants to be thom browne.
post #21 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klobber View Post
Button the middle button - it is quite common on 3 button jackets to button just the middle. I do in any case habitually.

Usually I button just the middle one, here I tried to make up for the missing length. With just the middle one, I think something looks more wrong than before. (see below)

Quote:
By seems of it, you are like me, conservative with occasional taste for eccentricity.

Could be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cncrd View Post
I was going to suggest a trick my tailor once tried for me on an L-length jacket that had a high button stance. He raised the pocket flaps about 3/4", so that they still covered the pocket opening, but gave the jacket better balance. It seems like a small adjustment, but having the flap that little bit higher worked to bring the shortened jacket back to a better proportion.

Very good idea. Thanks.

Quote:
But looking at your jacket, it seems that the button positioning is really too low to do much. If you button the middle button only, you'll really see how much the balance is off now. It seems to look better with the top two fastened than it might with the middle one only.

Yes, the best buttoning point would be between the top two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post
I don't know. As a newbie, I do not possess the keen eye for the details experienced members have but looking at it there's a feeling of something not right about it - a sort of nagging discord.

Exactly this is what I think. Since many of the rules are aimed for delivering a pleasent appearance to the common fellas, I guess most people will notice but can't say--in opposition to the expert--where the problem is.

Anyway, here are some additional pictures, this time only with the middle button closed.

Pocket flaps turned inside:



Waist taken in a bit (with the help of clamps in the back):



There are possibly issues with the area around the top button, so I guess my first take with buttoning the top two was better.
However, I'll take this opportunity to see what can be done with this blazer to rescue (of fvck up) as much as possible.
post #22 of 34
Nope. Proportions are too off. Sorry. Laypeople will probablynotice. But! You could go for the Black Fleece look.
post #23 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phxlawstudent View Post
Nope. Proportions are too off. Sorry.

Laypeople will probablynotice.

That's what I think, too. Anyway, I'll ask my tailoress about putting the pocket flaps higher and take the waist and chest in, I just wanna see.

Quote:
But! You could go for the Black Fleece look.

You probably mean this. This looks a bit like for the catwalk. But why not...
post #24 of 34
Definitely better with the flaps tucked in and I think most people probably IRL won't notice apart from that taking off 3" makes it look quite short on you. Next time 1.5-2" might be better. If you want to find a jacket you can trim down a little more than 1", look for one which has the pockets set a bit higher, a higher buttoning point, and the vents a little longer than usual as the one you have now has a pretty low buttoning point IMO.
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan_ View Post
You probably mean this. This looks a bit like for the catwalk. But why not...

Yes! But people buy the stuff!
post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer07 View Post
Definitely better with the flaps tucked in

I manipulated yesterday's picture and put the flaps 75% higher than they are. I think it looks a bit better now:



Quote:
and I think most people probably IRL won't notice apart from that taking off 3" makes it look quite short on you.

It would be interesting to research into common perception. I couldn't find in my literature anything (based on empirics) about how people actually perceive the fit and proportions of clothes and what attributes they associate with the wearer. I'm not thinking about something complicated, just making a kind of an A/B test and showing people different pictures with good and bad fit. Well, that's for another thread...

Quote:
Originally Posted by phxlawstudent View Post
Yes! But people buy the stuff!

I'm fine with it. So accidentally I could even become fashionable.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisFlyGuy View Post
yup looks a tad too short. still wearable though as most people probably won't notice

+1. Not quite right, but 99% won't know. However if you feel self conscious about it, give it away and move on.
post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan_ View Post
...It would be interesting to research into common perception. I couldn't find in my literature anything (based on empirics) about how people actually perceive the fit and proportions of clothes and what attributes they associate with the wearer. I'm not thinking about something complicated, just making a kind of an A/B test and showing people different pictures with good and bad fit. Well, that's for another thread...
...

This would make for possibly entertaining material. Video record this research

Most people would just stare at you with a quizzical look as you ask them about "the balance" of the jacket. As for length, maybe some men will say its short, but only because the jackets they are wearing are too long, including the sleeves.

Most people IRL perceive how a wearer clothes fits by comparing the wearer with Bradd pitt, ESPN announcers, or any other public figure associated with wearing suits and or jackets.

People on SF use the people on WAYWRN as their measuring stick.
post #29 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post
Most people would just stare at you with a quizzical look as you ask them about "the balance" of the jacket. As for length, maybe some men will say its short, but only because the jackets they are wearing are too long, including the sleeves.

I wouldn't ask them about fit. I'd ask them about what they think about this guy's social/economic status, whether he's credible (political statement, expert's opinion, ...) a.s.o., the A/B-testing would then show to A and B the same people with the same statements but with different outfits (some well-fitting, others are not).

So would I be judged different with my short blazer and a better-fitting SC? Am I more credible than the guy with the sleeves that are 2" too long and the trousers with a more-than-a-full-break? My hypothesis is that there are differences that can be measured.
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan_ View Post
^...
I see. If you start with a null hypothesis, this actually would be an interesting sociological study (even if there are similar ones). We sort of take it for granted that clothing act as signifiers of status and "prestige." The neat thing about sociological studies is that they reveal such tacit things through empirical evidence. I'd be interested to know what females ages 21-29 think of the fits and styles of fellow SF'ers . A study between internecine subjects (i.e. all businessmen who claim to wear Conservative Business Dress) would also be interesting to compare with other demographics. Have you any sociological background? I was a humanities major, so these things always pique my interest.
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