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Why do you buy used clothing? - Page 6

post #76 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
Said far better than I could have hoped. Have seen firsthand and wholeheartedly agree with this. I would rather not encourage the manufacturers to continue making short-life, disposable clothing by shopping retail.
So you are saying that you would rather not support the jobs of working people (those who man these factories and have homes and families to support). Even your tailor uses goods that are mass produced and provide jobs for hundreds of people. There is truly a ripple effect in this life/economy. All retail clothing is not crap or mediocre. Your statement is very elitist. How gauche.
post #77 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
You self-righteous left-wingers ought to spend more time in soup kitchens or building houses with Habitat for Humanity, than justifying your penchant for buying used clothing.
It was only one person that brought up the individual vs. social obligation, no one else - and since you've now resorted to ad hominem attacks, STOP SPELLING "JUDGMENT" WITH AN EXTRA "E."
post #78 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite42
It was only one person that brought up the individual vs. social obligation, no one else - and since you've now resorted to ad hominem attacks, STOP SPELLING "JUDGMENT" WITH AN EXTRA "E."
Judgement is an acceptable British variation. So enough already with the all caps, and know your subject before you call someone out. Ad hominem attack? You read too much into what I wrote.
post #79 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
Judgement is an acceptable British variation. So enough already with the all caps, and know your subject before you call someone out.

Ad hominem attack? You read too much into what I wrote.

I know that anyone who spells the word like that is laughed at amongst anyone in the legal community. I know my subject quite well.

EDIT: You may also want to look up the meaning of "ad hominem attack" and read the passage of yours that I quoted again. Hope that helps.
post #80 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite42
- and since you've now resorted to ad hominem attacks, STOP SPELLING "JUDGMENT" WITH AN EXTRA "E."



I think our beloved Carey has hit almost every logical fallacy known to man in this thread. If he's not a troll, he should be, since he'd make a good one.
post #81 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelerray


I think our beloved Carey has hit almost every logical fallacy known to man in this thread. If he's not a troll, he should be, since he'd make a good one.
Unfortunately, I have made the mistake of feeding the troll. Time for me to disengage for the good of the thread.
post #82 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
So you are saying that you would rather not support the jobs of working people (those who man these factories and have homes and families to support). Even your tailor uses goods that are mass produced and provide jobs for hundreds of people. There is truly a ripple effect in this life/economy. All retail clothing is not crap or mediocre. Your statement is very elitist. How gauche.

Ok, before I was more willing to give you the benefit of the doubt. I agree with the others now. No need to be so combative, Carey. Why should I or anyone here give a large rodent's hindquarters about your perceived status in society via your monetary buying power?
By the way, is the whole leftie thing suppossed to be an insult? ROTFL!
Sad sad sad.

Oh and

post #83 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
Clothes are not cars, nor are they like antique furniture.
Why are clothes different? Or rather, why can't clothing be antiques? Many of the people on this forum may well be termed collectors - viz. LabelKings and VintageGents recent "vintage items" threads. I don't think the Versace ties or the half-dozen dinner- and smoking jackets in those threads were bought to save money, but rather bought for the love of nice old objects. "Patina" is one of the nicest words I know - not wear, not dirt, but the feel of an old, well-maintained (or lovingly and restrainedly refurbished)quality object. I like things with a history, and yes, I love the few things I have with interesting provenances. New things are nice, but essentially uninteresting. Typically, a well-fitting, pristine SR dinner-jacket from the thirties is far more interesting to me than a new RLPL one. This may well be snobbish, but I know of cliques where having an old DJ, or old, well-used riding boots is considered far more "credible" than just having bought a new one. Anyone can do that. There are a few quite up-market vintage clothes shops in most larger cities these days, and the pricing there can sometimes be far steeper than what you see for most adequate quality new RTW clothing. The financial aspects of thrifting are self-illuminating. There's nothing wrong with saving money.
post #84 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
Taking care of the poor is not a social obligation, it is an individual obligation. It should be the work of charities, not the government. Lyndon Johnson was not able to wipe out poverty through welfare programs. So when you say you that providing for "these people" aren't you describing a social order. My beef is that someone could be so arrogant as to think their thrift store shopping is their donation to the poor.

You self-righteous left-wingers ought to spend more time in soup kitchens or building houses with Habitat for Humanity, than justifying your penchant for buying used clothing.

I have not advocated that one should know his place and act accordingly. I just don't pretend to be a humanitarian in a stunning old suit.

I don't think anyone implied that their only donation to the poor was their thrift store shopping, but I also don't understand how this ISN'T an donation to the poor, as it quite obviously is. You clearly don't see winos sporting Kiton suits, but the charities are certainly putting the money from its sale to help the needy.
post #85 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
You self-righteous left-wingers ought to spend more time in soup kitchens or building houses with Habitat for Humanity, than justifying your penchant for buying used clothing.



Had no idea that this is where this was going.
post #86 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey Taking care of the poor is not a social obligation, it is an individual obligation.
Taking care of the Carey is not a social obligation, it is an individual obligation.
post #87 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
So you are saying that you would rather not support the jobs of working people (those who man these factories and have homes and families to support). Even your tailor uses goods that are mass produced and provide jobs for hundreds of people. There is truly a ripple effect in this life/economy. All retail clothing is not crap or mediocre. Your statement is very elitist. How gauche.

This is a spurious argument. Purchasing items from a thrift store is benefiting a different group of people than purchasing items brand new from a retailer, but if one is making the assumption that the money is going to be spent anyways (I don't think anyone is saying that those people buying used/discount clothing are spending any less money than those purchasing retail, but most likely a larger selection) you're going to be benefiting someone with your purchases in any case, be it the poor/needy and those employees that work at the thrift shop, or the people working in the factories making new clothing. I don't think we're in any danger of oversaving, here in the US, if you're of the economic mindset that saving is bad.
post #88 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite42
Unfortunately, I have made the mistake of feeding the troll. Time for me to disengage for the good of the thread.
You took up the flag for someone else, then blasted me. When one participates in a thread, and a respondent's post contains quotations of my remarks, then I am entitled to respond. I was the one who was attacked and accused of thinking that everyone should know their place in the social order. I am an outsider here. It seems that you cannot accept those who think differently than you. Too bad for everyone, that you insult me, yet call me the troll.
post #89 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey

I am an outsider here. It seems that you cannot accept those who think differently than you.

Too bad for everyone, that you insult me, yet call me the troll.

I don't think that's the problem. I think what bothers people is that you set up what seems like an ordinary discussion for this forum, and then use that as a platform to turn it into some kind of political debate where a political debate does not belong.

If you recall my posts over the course of this thread, I mostly agreed with you about the general premise of not buying used clothes. However, you lost me when you turned it into some kind of debate over social order, greed, politics, liberal v. conservative and whatnot. Wearing used clothes has nothing to do with any of these things. I'm sure that it's not just liberals that are wearing used clothes. It seems like you just wanted to use the original topic of this thread as a springboard to discus your own political views and to point your finger and look down your nose at other members of this forum. To this, I must most strenuously object.
post #90 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
So you are saying that you would rather not support the jobs of working people (those who man these factories and have homes and families to support). Even your tailor uses goods that are mass produced and provide jobs for hundreds of people. There is truly a ripple effect in this life/economy. All retail clothing is not crap or mediocre. Your statement is very elitist. How gauche.

Carey, you evidently have strong feelings behind your insistence that you buy only new clothes, and I can respect that. I would like to point out a few issues with your statement above in what will be my final post in this thread and - with that - we can agree to disagree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
So you are saying that you would rather not support the jobs of working people (those who man these factories and have homes and families to support).
. There is a limit to what I feel the duty and obligation to support. We live in a (relatively) free-market economy, and I do not have the resources to support every man or woman who works in a factory or office. The fact that I spend any money at all means that I support someone as evidenced by your own words
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
Even your tailor uses goods that are mass produced and provide jobs for hundreds of people. There is truly a ripple effect in this life/economy.
, with which I agree wholeheartedly.

However, I don't believe that I resorted to any blanket statements or judgments that would require this response:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
All retail clothing is not crap or mediocre.
I certianly agree with you there.

But I don't see how not encouraging manufacturers to make short-life, disposable clothing (which I don't see you refuting directly) would be considered elitist. If being of the sort who prefers quality and durability, then elitist is a tag I would willingly wear.

As for gauche, I suspect you are either calling me tactless or sinister for having a viewpoint and the ability to express it. Not everyone will agree with you or me, and using names will neither advance your argument nor sway minds. Might I suggest a career in politics, if not already so employed.
Farewell in any case.
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