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Why do you buy used clothing? - Page 2

post #16 of 124
Ed summed it up quite well with his first post, and summej had a good point as well. I could purchase all of the items that I like at retail or new without it being a stress on my finances but buying used/discount items increases my buying power and allows my to indulge in more items that I like. There is always going to be more items that you like then that you have for most people, that is.
post #17 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
Your argument is all over the place. You don't wear used clothing because of it's potential to have been ball sweat drenched, yet you drive a used car in which people could have done the deed and deposited DNA in your coffee cup holder. Clothing, for the most part, also depreciates. I have no dog as I am neither a used clothing dealer nor am I a used clothing consumer ( I have purchased two used garments in the last few years). I just realize that not everyone can afford a lot of the brands that are discussed here. I also realize that there is a certain rush to thrifting, as I experienced it in the vintage watch market. Lastly, I would not look down nor talk down to those on a public forum who do it by stating "I guess I am too picky" as if those that purchase used clothing have lower standards than me.
My argument is not all over the place. Clothes are not a home, nor are they a car, nor are they like a watch. Those things are considered durable goods. Clothes are very personal items, almost like skin. I am not looking down on anyone. This idea struck me from another post where a respondent advised the readere to consider "used clothing". I looked at some posts on the Selling and Buying forum. It struck me as strange, maybe weird, why someone would want to purchase the actual garment as modelled by the seller. In some pictures, a seller shows the label of brand X jacket; but the picture shows a jacket that gaps behind the wearers neck, and the sleeves show about two inches of cuff. Are we so caught up in acquiring what we can't afford, that we will buy that brand X garment even if it is used and doesn't even fit the seller? I have been poor, and then I shopped only at outlets. I still shop the outlets. I just can't go used.
post #18 of 124
For me it frees up funds that could be better employed elsewhere, particularly for seldom-used goods such as ties and suits. I might wear a suit ten times a year, so I'm reluctant to drop serious cash on any suit or tie.

I also know from my own experience, that I have bought things I neither needed nor used. I have books that languish unread on my bookshelf, movies I have yet to strip the wrapper from, CD I have long-since forgotten, and tools that I have to dust off before using. I had thought that I was discerning in my purchases but faced with this evidence I have to conclude otherwise, and hope that I'll benefit from someone else who - like me - bought something, used it twice, and then moved on.
post #19 of 124
I grew up wearing second-hand clothes; I remember being 13 or 14 and having to wear some orange corduroy pants that my father had got for around one dollar (that was quite cheap even at that time...), while everybody around me wore fashionable blue jeans.
Nevertheless, I continued to buy a lot of my clothes second-hand until I was around 30, basically for economic reasons. I actually used to wear a lot of army surplus stuff, even to my first post-university employment (not to the interview, though).
Now I really enjoy buying the things I really like at retail price, without bothering about waiting for the sales (when the things I like may not be left) and without bothering about looking for odd items second hand. It just makes me feel happy being able to do so. Of course, due to the space problem I mentioned in another thread, I do not buy a lot of clothes, that is why I can afford going retail. Maybe with more space for my clothes, I would consider going second-hand again.
post #20 of 124
Why?

Because I can buy significantly better clothing for less money, which reduces my need to do things I don't feel like doing on a momentary basis so that I can fund useless consumerist habits. Because I'm not concerned about a bit of "history." Because clothing can easily be inspected for problems. Because I'm a broke ass scumbag. Because the necessity of "newness" in all things is a repulsive bourgeois trait proliferated by those lacking consideration or perspective. Because textile industries are massive polluters. Because fashion is bullshit.
post #21 of 124
Carey, I'm not sure you've presented anything that really amounts to a (reasoned) argument. I think you show a basic revulsion to wearing something that has perhaps touched someone else's skin or been in proximity to various bodily fluids. I can't explain it, but if that's how you feel then so be it. Let's just agree that there's nothing rational about your feeling. Objectively, humans are pretty much all alike. I don't spoil something for somebody else just by touching it. Anyway, I suspect you may just be putting us on (e.g. your admonishment against buying things that don't fit the seller).
I buy used clothes for a variety of reasons. Sure, I'd rather spend less money if possible. But really, I prefer used things. I like the connection with other people and other times. I like how things wear their age--it's an example to me. I'd hate to be restricted to what's in stores now. And I hate to encourage the production of clean, new mediocre clothes that will soon be shredded to stuff third-world mattresses.
post #22 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford
Because I can't afford to buy new versions of the brands I like
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack
Note to self: always wear underwear. I buy used stuff because I don't always have money for nice things. if I can get them lightly used they will be less than I would pay for something of less quality that costs more. Right now I am wearing some Alan McAfee that I bought used on Ebay for $12. They look brand new.
+1 (x2) I would not buy socks or udnerwear used but most other things are fair game. I mean, how the hell else could I afford, say, a Barbera suit? $50.00 is MUCH better than $2,500 Edit: That should read 500 not 50. But that is the only suit I own that came out to that much. My next most expensive was a 3pc Corneliani that was almost NWOT that I got for I think 190.00.
post #23 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergdorf Goodwill
Why? Because I can buy significantly better clothing for less money, which reduces my need to do things I don't feel like doing on a momentary basis so that I can fund useless consumerist habits. Because I'm not concerned about a bit of "history." Because clothing can easily be inspected for problems. Because I'm a broke ass scumbag. Because the necessity of "newness" in all things is a repulsive bourgeois trait proliferated by those lacking consideration or perspective. Because textile industries are massive polluters. Because fashion is bullshit.
Are we not all, of the masses? That is another thread. I am not making an argument against used clothing, I just want to know why people do it. It seems many here extoll the virtues of used clothing. I am not the type who once he stumbles upon something good, he has to go out an hord all that he can find.
post #24 of 124
Humble student's budget doesn't allow me the luxury of going to Savile Row to get a suit, and I like wearing suits though I don't like wearing (or owning) anything with no humanity invested in it, like some fused Mani garbage. I wear suits to work and to class all the time, for no reason other than my own joy. However, I have the added filip of partaking in the general consumerist society as little as possible. Really the only new things I buy are electronic devices and items that do work for me (pots and pans, &c). Most of my 'things' are handmade or antique. I don't like purchasing things that really had no care invested in them, but are merely the product of a bunch of people who crank whatever it is out the same as they would crank anything out (not their fault of course). So I buy a fifty year old suit or an eighty year old tux that was cut and tailored by hand, and in some sense that craftsman lives on. I'd hope he would be pleased to see his work still bringing someone satisfaction and compliments. I like pejseak's point, and would add that engaging in consumerist mediocrity does rather condone it, which I prefer to avoid. I do not, however, buy used shoes. I don't like feet. Regards, Huntsman
post #25 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
I am not making an argument against used clothing...
That's pretty much all you've been doing.

Quote:
...I just want to know why people do it. It seems many here extoll the virtues of used clothing.
People do it for the reasons stated. If you don't want to buy used clothing, then that's fine. It means less competition for the good stuff.

Why does it bother you so much that others do? Despite your claim of not wanting to stir the pot, that's clearly what you're intentionally doing.
post #26 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanC
That's pretty much all you've been doing. People do it for the reasons stated. If you don't want to buy used clothing, then that's fine. It means less competition for the good stuff. Why does it bother you so much that others do? Despite your claim of not wanting to stir the pot, that's clearly what you're intentionally doing.
I am not bothered by what others do, anymore than those who respond that buying new clothing somehow endorses the continued manufacture of substandard goods. Buying used bespoke doens't do anything for the furtherment of the craft either. The only beneficiary is the previous owner of the garment, and the purchaser who feels he has struck a fantastic bargain. Really, I just wanted to hear why someone will wear and even seek out used clothing. It seems that used clothing makes up a large part of some wardrobes here. Isn't that interesting? (interesting is not a judgemental term, and any feeling of judgement on the part of the reader is his own responsibility.)
post #27 of 124
Without wading into the whole argument here, I'll note that some of my favorite clothing items I found second-hand. My favorite odd jacket, an old Bladen hacking jacket, came to me well-worn, and that's one reason I like it so much. It has character, and a bit of history, and clearly was well-loved by someone else. Also, I could scour every store within 1,000 miles of here and find nothing like it.

I have to say, though, that I understand why someone wouldn't like the idea of wearing used clothes. I have my limits. I can't bring myself to consider shoes with any more wear than from normal store trials. I also buy my shirts and trousers new, though I'll buy lightly worn suits. Illogical, ain't it?
post #28 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
I am not bothered by what others do, anymore than those who respond that buying new clothing somehow endorses the continued manufacture of substandard goods.

Whoa, I may be misreading you here, but are you saying that you don't believe that being part of the demand group (that is, purchasing) an inferior good affects the supply of such goods?
post #29 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
Humble student's budget doesn't allow me the luxury of going to Savile Row to get a suit, and I like wearing suits though I don't like wearing (or owning) anything with no humanity invested in it, like some fused Mani garbage. I wear suits to work and to class all the time, for no reason other than my own joy. However, I have the added filip of partaking in the general consumerist society as little as possible. Really the only new things I buy are electronic devices and items that do work for me (pots and pans, &c). Most of my 'things' are handmade or antique. I don't like purchasing things that really had no care invested in them, but are merely the product of a bunch of people who crank whatever it is out the same as they would crank anything out (not their fault of course). So I buy a fifty year old suit or an eighty year old tux that was cut and tailored by hand, and in some sense that craftsman lives on. I'd hope he would be pleased to see his work still bringing someone satisfaction and compliments. I like pejseak's point, and would add that engaging in consumerist mediocrity does rather condone it, which I prefer to avoid. I do not, however, buy used shoes. I don't like feet. Regards, Huntsman
Your statement is a bit flawed, because if you purchase new electronic devices (e.g. cell phones, stereos and tv's), how much care is invested in these mediocre things that are obsolete by tomorrow. We really have no other choice when it comes to mass produced consumer items, except to not purchase them, and then only at the expense of our loss of convenience. I appreciate tyour sentiment to want to preserve the joy one gets out of a bespoke garment, even if it was made for someone who is now deceased. As for consumerism, without it the world would be a very poor place. Rampant consumerism, which is a masked term intended for envy and greed, is an undersirable quality in any person. If one eats at a McDonald's or Burger King, or Cheesecake Factory, is he merely eating a meal because he is hungry, or is he really endorsing mediocrity? Could be both. Best regards, Carey I like civil discourse.
post #30 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
Whoa, I may be misreading you here, but are you saying that you don't believe that being part of the demand group (that is, purchasing) an inferior good affects the supply of such goods?
Examples: E. Zegna, Samuelsohn, Hickey-Freeman (fully-canvassed only), Allen Edmond's shoes, Bill's Khakis. All of these are factory made. All of these are considered to be good quality. Hell I bet Levi's still makes a decent jean. Just because a manufacturer makes something that can be sold to thousands of people, does not make that manufacturer mediocre. Not many here can afford a completely bespoke wardrobe. If one's bespoke item is second hand, then you have not purchsed bespoke (i.e. made for you). That bespoke jacket just became a low volume manufactured good. Your purchase did not benefit the manufacturer, unless you bought it from him.
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