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Knife Set - Page 5

post #61 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post
so a super sharp knife makes life harder because they get stuck in the cutting board?
No, that is one reason they don't work well for some people. The VG 10 and other types of hard steel are very, very hard to keep sharp. These laser like edges don't last forever and soon you end up with an expensive blunt object. Also, I'm quite positive that most people's technique would not change much from a less expensive product.
post #62 of 151
i agree that super sharp knives can chip easily and are definitely harder to sharpen, but honyakis are supposed to have highest edge retention (kirenaga) by virtue of the way they're made (forged layered single steel instead of a soft metal in the middle with a hard metal on the outside). as long as you dont drop it i think its a personal matter of balance of how much you want to take really good care of your knives vs how much joy you derive out of using them
post #63 of 151
Like I said, these artisans rely on people with the love and the money necessary to keep their art form alive. By the end of my life time, so many crafts are going to be dead, so whatever can be kept alive, I'm all for it.

But yeah, I don't think most people can handle it. Up to them though.
post #64 of 151
yeah that's very true. i would very much like to support craftsmen rather than large global brands. watanabe's workshop has a level of skill and dedication to his craft that i feel like we might miss out in a few generations. also i'm not sure how much less fragile his normal gyutos are, but they're in the same price range as the misonos.
post #65 of 151
For the average home chef, learning how to sharpen a knife is more important then getting a high end knife. I rather have people buy say a Dexter Russell or a Forshner then a Shun any day of the week. These inexpensive knives are the knives most restaurants use and work great. I really can't imagine the average home chef maintaining a japanese knife with it's super hard alloy. I think most people need to know that super hard metal knives need to be resharpen. Where as softer steels can be rehoned with a steel, super hard metal you would probably do more damage then if you were just to leave the knife alone without steeling.

That being said, spending say $70 for a Tojiro would not be the end of the world. But recommending a $400 knife for the average home chef is a waste IMHO.
post #66 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post
Please listen to my advice, best knives are from Cutco! They do a forever guarantee and will always fix your knives, sharpening i think is separate, i have a set and no regrets, these will last you a lifetime.
my gf used to work for cutco and because of her i now have a lot of cutco knives and definitely recommend them

^^ Kyle, why haven't you spamminated this ^ guy? (kidding. kind of)

Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I think people have no idea how much skill it takes to keep a knife like that sharp, and to use it correctly. 99.999999% of the people, it is a total waste.

^^ Truth

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post
and your a jerk, who hasnt said anything useful

^^ Not truth

Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
No, that is one reason they don't work well for some people.

The VG 10 and other types of hard steel are very, very hard to keep sharp. These laser like edges don't last forever and soon you end up with an expensive blunt object.

Also, I'm quite positive that most people's technique would not change much from a less expensive product.

The softer steels are easier to keep up with and require less patience over the stone. The harder steels require a lot more time to get the edge right - which means more time on the stone(s), which funny enough most people don't have the patience to keep at it - and maintain the same form. Most people lose interest after a short while and either stop or their form on the stone starts to suffer, usually at a bad time.
post #67 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
A super sharp knife is much better to cut with, but the problem with a very hard knife like the ones you mention, and the super geek websites love, is that they chip easily and they are hard as fuck to sharpen. So, if you get one, you won't have to worry about having a really sharp knife, you will have to worry about having a really dull knife. Just trying to help.

QFT. If you can't do the maintenance, buying the knife is counterproductive. Get something you have the skills to sharpen.
post #68 of 151

Can we please make SField's custom title "useless?"
post #69 of 151
It's pretty obvious who here knows what they are talking about.

If you want to buy a super high end knife - buy it, but don't even pretend you need to - lots of pros use pretty inexpensive knives (like MAC or Forschner, etc.). Then budget to have it sharpened like the high performance object it is (yes you can learn how to do it properly, and no, you won't probably do it as regularly as you should).

Shuns are fine, and were up on Gilt recently.
post #70 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post
It's pretty obvious who here knows what they are talking about.

If you want to buy a super high end knife - buy it, but don't even pretend you need to - lots of pros use pretty inexpensive knives (like MAC or Forschner, etc.). Then budget to have it sharpened like the high performance object it is (yes you can learn how to do it properly, and no, you won't probably do it as regularly as you should).

Shuns are fine, and were up on Gilt recently.

MAC aren't inexpensive.... they're very good knives and I used to see them all the time. But the most common kitchen workhorse knife I saw is probably Misono.
post #71 of 151
I have an 8" henckels and it suits me fine. I keep it sharp and it cuts food. I also have 2 kind of crappy paring knives (one is short but the blade is too thick...the other is longer and the blade is too flexy) that I occasionally use when the chef's is not suited to the task. There is a $10 bread knife that occasionally gets used. This is all I need. I do have maybe 2 other knives hanging on the rack that might be used when guests use my kitchen (or help cook since there are no other choices).

I am thinking about getting something like a 240mm (9-10") gyuto to try out as occasionally I wish for a longer knife and it might be nice to try something without such a deep belly.

Any suggestions on a cheap stone? I've rolled with the spyderco triangle but I recognize its limitations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I think people need to go sit at a proper sushi bar and watch them work... their skills are ridiculous. Aka, you can't fucking do it.

Any chicago "proper" sushi bar recommendations? My friends just go to crappy (often all you can eat) places to sit at a table and eat mealy salmon and fancy rolls. Nobody is ever interested in going to sit at a bar and having an exchange with the guy who is making your food (which is what I was used to considering the sushi experience before I went to college)
post #72 of 151
what I've learned for the past 12 hours... next to clothes, nothing creates more heat in sf than knives...
post #73 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidboy View Post
what I've learned for the past 12 hours... next to clothes, nothing creates more heat in sf than knives...
Well, it has all the ingredients. People with (likely) no skill are able to learn foreign words through the internet to describe tools with snob appeal that they have no idea how to use. Just kidding, kind of. Seriously, I think people have little idea what it means to have good knife skills, and at what level you are actually gaining something from having one of these tools. It always ends in a big swinging dick-off, which is why the internet was invented in the first place, right?
post #74 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
Any chicago "proper" sushi bar recommendations? My friends just go to crappy (often all you can eat) places to sit at a table and eat mealy salmon and fancy rolls. Nobody is ever interested in going to sit at a bar and having an exchange with the guy who is making your food (which is what I was used to considering the sushi experience before I went to college)
I'm a long time devotee of Mirai. Very creative stuff. Super fresh. Just started going to Arami - really love it. I've heard great things about the place on Ontario in the Tokyo Hotel (Ginza Sushi). Also Coast (BYOB - very crowded and slow) and South Coast (not BYOB, easy to get into) are both okay. OH - and Gerard says Sushi Cootchie in the 'burbs is better than japan (that was for you, Kwilky)
post #75 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
It always ends in a big swinging dick-off, which is why the internet was invented in the first place, right?

Precisely.
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