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How much do your surroundings affect your dress? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by epa View Post
+1.

I sometimes put a hankerchief into by breast pocket, but no fancy folds. And even so I get comments. I.


I often put a pocket square in my jacket pockets and no one gives a damn! Still, I enyoy doing it.

tTE
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Working Stiff View Post
Clothes are a means of communicating with the people around you. There's nothing wrong with wearing a bowtie, or being the only guy wearing a pocket square, but it does send a message. If you are thinking about wearing these things, you should first be sure that that's a message you want to send.

Very well said.

There is often a difference in the way we wish to be perceived and the way we actually are perceived. I would take it slow and ask yourself whether a given wadrobe addition will draw negative attention.

Bowties, suspendered pants, double-breasted suits are going to raise eyebrows. I might work in a bow tie on a special occasion, for example. On the other hand, buttoning your suit (!), wearing a white pocket square in a TV-fold, or working in a nice pair of shoes will probably go (mostly) unnoticed. (No one needs to know your shoes cost $600, and anyway, sharing that information would be crass.)

Keep in mind that truly dressing well generally means not drawing attention to one's appearance. We reserve that for the females of the species.
post #18 of 26
I personally care very little if somebody thinks negatively about me based on my clothes. If they do, why do I want to associate myself with that kind of person anyway? Granted, I wear suits 7 days a week and don't look like a slob I still am overdressed in a lot of situations. Overdressing has its negatives in some contexts, but I don't care, it is what I like. I would say that if you are talking about a purple mohawk it is different, but dressing better can only get rid of riff raff and attract more like-minded, useful people. ...or panhandlers and charity volunteers.
post #19 of 26
also keep in mind that what's shown here on this forum is a collection of people/opinions from various environments and lifestyles. It's probably USA centric with a little italian and asian influence... but I see guys rocking gunboat wingtips, seersucker, sack 3R2 suits and bowties and it's a perfect look but completely inappropriate for me, my environment, and my position. What seems to be the accepted norm or even expected 'correct' form of dress on this board is actually a variety of looks, often praised not because they seemlessly blend in but specifically because they stand out. I've bought things that were forum-approved like brightly colored pants or pocket squares but it's totally inappropriate for me and most important, I'M not comfortable. here's a little point from a book on etiquette - the purpose of 'the rules' is to ensure that everyone knows what's expected and they won't find themselves in a position where they're unsure and end up being off the mark. The purpose is to make everyone comfortable because they know what they need to do/wear. Not to say that you should play to the lowest or even common denominator, but dressing up is about self respect and respect for the environment and others that work there. Dressing for what's appropriate in one person's environment (eg the forum standard or the environment of some of the posters) might get you dressing completely inappriopriately for your own environment, and making yourself and others uncomfortable. my advice is to try push your bounds a little (eg wintips) but you might do irreprable damage if you push too far. Suddenly you're the guy with green pants, not the guy who dresses nicely and does good work.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post
Suddenly you're the guy with green pants, not the guy who dresses nicely and does good work.

...i'm wearing green pants today.
post #21 of 26
Hi

I've just joined this forum in order to explore and find my true style of clothing, and as was suggested here, I do believe clothes are a way of communication.

Regarding surrounding, there is an important element that I don't think was explored here- the climate.

I recently moved from a very hot climate to a very cold one, and am delighted to start dressing better since my body heat is much more tolerable here.

For me, wearing a suit in a hot climate made me so uncomfortable that it hindered the whole message I was trying to communicate.
I would become agitated, constantly sweating and just can't wait to take the whole thing off.



I have now bought a 3 piece suit and a nice fedora that I think complement my overall look.

The problem is that having a shaved head, in a cold climate there are very few elegant ways to keep one's head warm enough....
The fedora is not warm enough.

any ideas?
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
Since I've stepped up my game a couple of years ago, it HAS been noticed - even though I work in a suited environment. While a subject of some good natured kidding, I've noticed that about a half-dozen colleagues have taken my lead and similarly stepped-up their game as well with better fitting suits, pocket squares, and more sophisticated shirt-tie-suit combos. One good dresser can have a lot of impact by showing others not only how it's done but that it can be done without becoming a social outcast. And most importantly, I've shown that the uber-boss will appreciate a staffer who can dress well - an important cue for many.

This has been my experience as well, when I worked in Finance I was in a particularly casual office. Most people were happy that i didnt care about the dress code because they similarly started improving their rigging.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by epa View Post
+1.

A bowtie certainly sends a message. I see a guy with a bowtie and I think that either it is a dandy, or he has no idea, depends on who it is and the rest of the outfit.

And when it is about your job, you have to be careful about sending messages.

I sometimes put a hankerchief into by breast pocket, but no fancy folds. And even so I get comments. I am in a senior position and have a good relation to boss and co-workers, so I feel OK doing it, but I would not do it the first day on my new job, especially not if being more towards the junior end. I would move carefully.


I agree with this.

I work in an office full of Oxford shoes varying from Lobb's to Tesco/Walmart all in varying degrees of shine. Everyone wear single breasted suits, but you could get away with a good quality DB, and again in varying quality from bespoke to Topman/Zara. Ties range from Hermes to Tesco/Walmart.

So on the suit front you can pretty much put a standard suit together however you wish.

BUT - there is only one person in the firm who wears a pocket square - there are some 1,000 staff. And most people know who that person is. Message sending - certainly, good - who knows.
post #24 of 26
Well, there are a lot of ways to up your game in the office. One is certainly to (for lack of a better word) "dandify" your outfit with pocket squares, bowties, DBs or what have you. This certainly is expressive and will make you stand out in almost any field, and thus will draw a range of reactions over time.

While this approach is often taken either very senior execs who don't have to give a damn or by someone who is new to - and constantly experimenting with - dressing well in search of an individual style, I think the above advice about one's own personal comfort with one's presentation and the reaction to it should guide all.

Another way is to simply dress very quietly - sober suits, ties, simple shirts, killer shoes - but all of top-notch fabrics and expertly tailored. The resulting composition and superior fit will make you stand apart over time like no bow tie could, but few people would ever be able to put their finger on exactly why you look so damn good.

Either way, there will be a reaction. It may take awhile to come out, but the Q is how you will experience and/or deal with it.
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spark View Post

Another way is to simply dress very quietly - sober suits, ties, simple shirts, killer shoes - but all of top-notch fabrics and expertly tailored. The resulting composition and superior fit will make you stand apart over time like no bow tie could, but few people would ever be able to put their finger on exactly why you look so damn good.

^ This is my current path. While I still haven't gotten there yet with regard to fit and fabrics, that's where I'm headed I think. I have no interest in bowties, loud colors, overly tight fits, loud pocket squares, etc. I don't have anything against them, but that stuff just isn't my style. I've always preferred more understated things. I may try a DB suit at some point. I'm tall and fit, so it might work okay for me.

I think I'm going to pass on the pocket squares for now. I might try a very simple linen one that's carefully folded and barely visible though. I think I might like it if it's just barely there. We'll see...

Thank you all for your comments. The discussion has certainly been helpful for me.

D
post #26 of 26
I think that is the next level, IMO. After someone is done with all of the 'fun socks' and pocket squares, ect you move onto subtle elegance. Give me fit and finish over outlandishness any day.

Maybe it's just a reaction to my current field, but I feel best in black shoes, a charcoal suit, a pinstripe shirt and a neat pattern on navy blue tie.
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