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Another reason not to wear non-iron dress shirts. - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timeless Fashion View Post
I see a lot of non-iron shirt haters here. Do anyone of you travel routinely for business?

Just curious since that is when the non-iron shirts are best for so you don't have to spend time irong your shirts in your hotel rooms before business meetings when you are travelling for business.

Yes, I'm on the road one or two weeks each month. If you hang your shirts in the closet when you get to the hotel, any wrinkles from the suitcase are usually gone by morning. If anything is there, 2 minutes with the iron takes care of it.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
Yes, I'm on the road one or two weeks each month. If you hang your shirts in the closet when you get to the hotel, any wrinkles from the suitcase are usually gone by morning. If anything is there, 2 minutes with the iron takes care of it.

Also, put the shirts in the b-room when you shower, it eliminates most wrinkles.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi Man View Post
I would expect most the shirts whether they are non-iron would last three to four years.

How long should the shirt last?
I've had many that lasted much longer. YMMV.
post #19 of 29
did anyone read the last part where formaldahyde is also in dry cleaning?
post #20 of 29
I think non-iron has its place. For me, that would be the donation bin once my current stock of 5 wears out.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by thejollyco View Post
did anyone read the last part where formaldahyde is also in dry cleaning?
Yes, but your local dry cleaner should not actually be dry cleaning your shirts. They should be laundering your shirts.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by viator View Post
Yes, but your local dry cleaner should not actually be dry cleaning your shirts. They should be laundering your shirts.
But there are things that they do dry clean that come into contact with your body. Say, pants. And touching skin or not, you're going to breathe in whatever chemicals are coming off that jacket. Dry cleaning is much worse. PERC is nasty stuff. Of course, naptha is probably worse, as well as somewhat more flammable*. I don't get the huge fuss, apart from the wearing hot critique. Also, I'm pretty sure not all non iron treatments are the same. *for those unfamiliar, naptha also goes by such names as "white gas" and "lighter fluid". Which does mean that such products can be used for spot removal.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post
Also, put the shirts in the b-room when you shower, it eliminates most wrinkles.

This is a myth.
post #24 of 29
They also fuck up your iron with residue if you steam them alot on a high setting.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timeless Fashion View Post
I see a lot of non-iron shirt haters here. Do anyone of you travel routinely for business?

Just curious since that is when the non-iron shirts are best for so you don't have to spend time irong your shirts in your hotel rooms before business meetings when you are travelling for business.

I agree with this. I hate non-iron shirts a lot, but I'm not gonna lie: I have two white and two blue for travelling. They are the bees knees.
post #26 of 29
Team Non-Iron. I have all-cotton shirts too. They don't hold up as well if too much time lapses between ironing and wearing.
post #27 of 29
I've never been moved to try them. I travel a lot and I don't find my plain old cotton shirts get that bent out of shape from folding, and a little hang and/or a little shower steam typically helps. That said, I don't necessarily go in for the totally starched, pressed look anyways, so a look that's well short of military doesn't bother me in the least. I actually prefer a softer, more comfortable look. Obviously, I do have to iron them at home after washing though. If you are shower steaming, it actually helps just to turn the heat to full hot after you get out and let the room completely steam up.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post
Sounds like dry cleaning is worse.

I like the convience of the shirts, but other qualities are definitely compromised. I've also found that after about three years the shirts start to tear apart in unexpected places. Never thought I'd try them, and I can't say I'm glad I did, but I've been spared of dry cleaner bills or time ironing.

+2 - Given the amount of time I spend on the road I found them very practical. However, I also find they have a shelf of around 3 years. They tend to fray and then tear apart after that. I started just today to replace them with "normal" cotton dress shirts. I brought home 2 Thomas Pink 170's today, and after ironing them, I think they're just as easy to care for as the non-iron variety. I've read previously that the higher count dress shirts tend to be easier to care for, so far I am finding this to be true...no reason for the non-irons perhaps when buying the better stuff?

...steaming works. Full blast for ~10 to 15 minutes followed by a quick touch up ususally does it.

Just my 2 cents...
post #29 of 29
Maybe I did something wrong ( not sure how) but I found that these shirts look like crap. Sure, they look better than a regular shirt out of the dryer, but far from a nice pressed shirt from the cleaners. I hate wrinkles and wound up ironing my "non-iron" shirts, so they wound up at the Goodwill.
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