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Another reason not to wear non-iron dress shirts.

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/...n-formaldehyde
post #2 of 29
The main reason not to wear them, of course, is that they feel weird against you skin and wear hot. I f*cking hate them with a passion.
post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
The main reason not to wear them, of course, is that they feel weird against you skin and wear hot. I f*cking hate them with a passion.

X2. I have yet to feel a non-iron that is as comfortable as a must-iron.
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post
X2. I have yet to feel a non-iron that is as comfortable as a must-iron.

You can date the fall of Brooks Brothers by the replacement of most of their inventory of classic dress shirts with those horrible non-irons. They constitute about 80-90% of what you'll find in their larger stores like the one I used to shop at in downtown DC. I still curse the saleswoman who talked me into a couple of these monstrosities a few years ago. Total waste of money.
post #5 of 29
Sounds like dry cleaning is worse. I like the convience of the shirts, but other qualities are definitely compromised. I've also found that after about three years the shirts start to tear apart in unexpected places. Never thought I'd try them, and I can't say I'm glad I did, but I've been spared of dry cleaner bills or time ironing.
post #6 of 29
post #7 of 29
a fine shirting fabric has a sheen that is pleasing to the eye.
Non-iron glistens in a way that looks cheap!

I can usually spot non-iron from about 10 feet away
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post
Sounds like dry cleaning is worse.

I like the convience of the shirts, but other qualities are definitely compromised. I've also found that after about three years the shirts start to tear apart in unexpected places. Never thought I'd try them, and I can't say I'm glad I did, but I've been spared of dry cleaner bills or time ironing.

I would expect most the shirts whether they are non-iron would last three to four years.

How long should the shirt last?
post #9 of 29
I am not even sure what kind of non-iron shirt people here are talking about? uncomfortable? developing sheen? I have a very cheap non-iron shirt bought in a hurry an it is very comfortable and develops no sheen, the only thing I hate about it is it's obviously-very-cheap-looking collar and the insubstantial weight of the fabric.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjornb17 View Post

+1
post #11 of 29
I have a couple that I like the fit of and the color of the material, but I can't stand the way they feel. I have tried to repeatedly wash them in hot, hoping I could somehow strip them of the treatment, to no avail. I guess they are going in the donation bag.

Mike
post #12 of 29
I hate them with all my heart ....
post #13 of 29
I see a lot of non-iron shirt haters here. Do anyone of you travel routinely for business?

Just curious since that is when the non-iron shirts are best for so you don't have to spend time irong your shirts in your hotel rooms before business meetings when you are travelling for business.
post #14 of 29
I LOVE non-iron so much that I hope to never buy anything else, ever again. There is nothing more annoying than wearing a shirt once, only to look like shit. Non-iron is the greatest innovation in clothing in the last 30 years. And considering the amount saved in laundering bills, they're the best bargain ever also. On one shirt, you might save $50/year. (if you launder after 2 wears)
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
...and wear hot

+1

I sweat like a pig. Leather car seats. All of 3 minutes in the car and its time to change.
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