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Tie Care - Page 3

post #31 of 45
the only time that i have had my ties "serviced" was when they have been stains(possibly 5 times in my life.) i just hang them and that's it.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cant kill da Rooster View Post
If ties are carefully rolled and stored, does this really apply? I prefer not to hang mine.
Cant kill da Rooster, I can only say that I would never even consider rolling a tie. The main reason being that we work hard to make beautiful ties and I would not want to see even one tie damaged.
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post
Cant kill da Rooster,

I can only say that I would never even consider rolling a tie.

The main reason being that we work hard to make beautiful ties and I would not want to see even one tie damaged.

David,

Considering I have about 20k $ worth of ties all rolled up, please explain how this damage can occur? I roll them up loosely, space them on their sides, and have the containers fabric lined.
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post
David, Considering I have about 20k $ worth of ties all rolled up, please explain how this damage can occur? I roll them up loosely, space them on their sides, and have the containers fabric lined.
idfnl, The damage that I am talking about is to the tips. When packing ties tips can be hurt if the tie is rolled as ties move around. When static in a draw etc in theory the tips will stay in place and not be hurt but theory is just that theory. Things happen. Also while many gentlemen are very careful while rolling their ties others will do it quickly and I am concerned about possible damage to the tips while rolling the ties. Lots of people drive cars around the world without seat belts and do not get hurt but I still prefer seat belts... In the end everyone needs to do what they feel comfortable with and my advice only applies to luxury ties. I say luxury ties because inexpensive Chinese or machine made ties either don't have nice tips to start with or the ties are so inexpensive as to make this discussion irrelevant. Also it is good to keep things in perspective we are so passionate about our tie making that we keep our silk rooms airconditioned to control the temperature and humidity. By the way $20,000 is a lot of ties!
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by kafziel View Post
I tie the ideal knot for each tie I have - different knots depending on the tie and how I plan to wear it - and then I don't have to tie it again. I might occasionally untie one for some reason, but assuming it was tied perfectly the first time and I tie it perfectly the second time (which I do), all the creases inside the knot will still end up in exactly the same place.

I just don't understand the idea of fanatically caring for a relatively inexpensive accessory that will eventually go out of style anyway. Shoes, yes. Watches, yes. Socks, pocket squares, and boxer shorts, no. Even if I had meticulously rolled every black-and-aqua skinny tie I had in the 90s, I still would have ended up getting rid of them.

With all due respect, that seems very strange. I love tying a successful tie knot. It's a big part of wearing a tie for me.

But may be I'm the strange one.
post #36 of 45
David when are your fina ties coming out?
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post
David when are your fina ties coming out?
Ianiceman, The Grenadine Garza Fina silk has been woven and we are now waiting for some Grenadine Garza Grossa pin dots to be finished - then they will all be shipped to us. Lets say roughly April we will be ready to make the Fina grenadines.
post #38 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post
Keeping your knots tied is a big mistake. First, it eventually misshapens the line of the blade. Second, it makes really nasty wrinkles which are very hard to get rid of. Lastly, this is a bad idea because the knot is constantly exposed to skin and touch and will eventually dirty. Tying new knots helps disperse the soiling since you wont knot the same exact place twice.


In terms of care, the advice above makes sense. Agreed, dont dry clean unless its stained.


Personally, I roll my ties. It releases the fabric better than hanging, IMO.

2 other pieces of advice.... always undo your knots the same way you originally tied them. Dont ever, EVER, ever do the yank until the short end comes thru. Second, keep your nail trim. Easiest way to ruin a great Marinalla is with a pull that came from a loose fingernail. This also goes for dry skin.

- Thanks for the advice. I've read this before re: undoing my knots that way. So what does that mean? Instead of just pulling my tie off like I watched my old man do for years I actually loosen the whole knot and reverse it? Thanks again.
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nizzer View Post
- Thanks for the advice. I've read this before re: undoing my knots that way. So what does that mean? Instead of just pulling my tie off like I watched my old man do for years I actually loosen the whole knot and reverse it? Thanks again.

Exactly. Its better for your tie. Less stress on the fibers. You can see the stress on the tie yourself, try it on something cheap.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post

idfnl,


The damage that I am talking about is to the tips.

When packing ties tips can be hurt if the tie is rolled as ties move around.

When static in a draw etc in theory the tips will stay in place and not be hurt but theory is just that theory. Things happen.

Also while many gentlemen are very careful while rolling their ties others will do it quickly and I am concerned about possible damage to the tips while rolling the ties.

Lots of people drive cars around the world without seat belts and do not get hurt but I still prefer seat belts...

In the end everyone needs to do what they feel comfortable with and my advice only applies to luxury ties. I say luxury ties because inexpensive Chinese or machine made ties either don't have nice tips to start with or the ties are so inexpensive as to make this discussion irrelevant.

Also it is good to keep things in perspective we are so passionate about our tie making that we keep our silk rooms airconditioned to control the temperature and humidity.

By the way $20,000 is a lot of ties!


Rolling in reverse can protect the tips, wide side first.

I do have a number of ties that are unlined and hand ticked at the tip, one in fact is yours. In addition, I have a number of silk knits I have to be careful with.

So far, I've never had a problem.

Oh, another thing I should mention.... what started me rolling the in the first place is one of our fukking cats decided to have fun with one of my Canali's and left it looking like a poor man's grenadine. Since then I keep them in a barrister bookcase in my office.

Ya, I have a good 200 or so ties. I cant help it.
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by phxlawstudent View Post
Exactly. Its better for your tie. Less stress on the fibers. You can see the stress on the tie yourself, try it on something cheap.

If you do this long enough, you'll eventually snap the thread of the spine. Almost every broken spine is because of this.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post
....... I do have a number of ties that are unlined and hand ticked at the tip, one in fact is yours...... ......... one of our fukking cats decided to have fun with one of my Canali's and left it looking like a poor man's grenadine. Since then I keep them in a barrister bookcase in my office. Ya, I have a good 200 or so ties. I cant help it.
Good to hear that you have one of our ties - so now I have vested interest in keeping your collection in perfect shape. Lets see - we've talked at great length about rolling and others have talked about unfolding at the end of the day as well as the tragedy of stains. What's left? What about proper care for wool ties? We have been lucky - knock on silk - but maybe they don't have wool eating moths in Thailand? They do have man eating tigers here but the tigers eat people with or without ties so it may be straying a bit far off our subject.
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post
Good to hear that you have one of our ties - so now I have vested interest in keeping your collection in perfect shape.

Lets see - we've talked at great length about rolling and others have talked about unfolding at the end of the day as well as the tragedy of stains.

What's left?

What about proper care for wool ties?

We have been lucky - knock on silk - but maybe they don't have wool eating moths in Thailand? They do have man eating tigers here but the tigers eat people with or without ties so it may be straying a bit far off our subject.


This is what I do... happy to hear your thoughts.

I dont segregate the wool/cashmere/mixes. I've got about 16 - 20 total. I intermix them with the silks, somehow I've convinced myself it reduces the risk of moths.

I've read an occasional dry cleaning is the only real way to prevent damage, but I've got my ties in a sealed set of barrister bookcases so once a year I open a can of moth balls in there and leave it for a week or 2. Never seen a moth hole.
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post
This is what I do... happy to hear your thoughts. I dont segregate the wool/cashmere/mixes. I've got about 16 - 20 total. I intermix them with the silks, somehow I've convinced myself it reduces the risk of moths. I've read an occasional dry cleaning is the only real way to prevent damage, but I've got my ties in a sealed set of barrister bookcases so once a year I open a can of moth balls in there and leave it for a week or 2. Never seen a moth hole.
Sounds good. Probably the key is keeping the ties and storage area clean. We do have 50 meter rolls of wool that we use to cut our necktie interlinings from and we have never had a problem. After we open the rolls to cut interlinings we always seal the rolls of wool with plastic. When I stop to think about almost all luxury ties are partially wool - which is what the interlining is made from.
post #45 of 45

I am going to Necro Postthis thread just to try andkeepsome things neat and tidy as opposed to starting a new thread. If i don't get an answer,I will go that route.

 

I had two ties in a suitcase that D...a Airlines decided to drop in a puddle long enough to get the insides good and truly wet, ties include. I have laid the ties out flat for a while to let them air dry, but I have noticed they are wrinkling quite a bit where they were wet. These are E.G. Capeli Grenadine ties. Should i just hang them back up and pretend that nothing happened? or is there some other step i should take to make sure the ties survive this ordeal?

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