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Cordings of piccadilly - Page 10

post #136 of 150
What about Cordings versus Oliver Brown in moleskin or needlecord jacket?

I prefer double vent and wider lapel, but I fear although Oliver Brown costs more that the quality is less than Cordings?

I wonder if moleskin is more beautiful than needlecord in a jacket?
post #137 of 150
You who dry clean cotton trousers are not as poor as I and live where dry cleaning must cost less. I recommend whatever brand - I know two I consider better than Cordings - always buy larger sizes because cotton trousers shrink when washed, far more than one thinks.
post #138 of 150
I read just recently Sunspel left Turkey. My undershirt or tshirt is Sunspel. I'm very happy with Sunspel tshirts which I buy on sale and a size larger. No problems with disintegration I always had with Smedley.
post #139 of 150
OT but I must concur that sunspel t-shirts are peerless. Still painful to pay that much for a t-shirt though.
post #140 of 150
tbrock about buying sunspel t-shirts: I kept searching and got all mine, all made in England crew neck, short-sleeves, L - none black, grey nor white - below thirty quid on sale online by checking everyday.

I got two negative judgments about moleskin as jacket cloth:
1. Loses shape
2. Heavy and stiff
post #141 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naive, Jr. View Post

You who dry clean cotton trousers are not as poor as I and live where dry cleaning must cost less. I recommend whatever brand - I know two I consider better than Cordings - always buy larger sizes because cotton trousers shrink when washed, far more than one thinks.

I who dry clean cotton trousers follow the care instructions. Most of my cotton trousers, such as Brooks Bros Clark chinos, are machine-washable and OK to tumble dry with very little shrinkage. My Cordings cotton trousers are dry cleaned and, yeah, cost about $8 to do so. So be it.
post #142 of 150
Wow, eight bucks hard-earned to dry clean a pair of cotton trousers! If I were to dry clean my cotton clothing I hardly have money to buy more!
Edited by Naive, Jr. - 1/8/16 at 12:06am
post #143 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naive, Jr. View Post

Wow, eight bucks hard-earned to dry clean a pair of cotton trousers! If I were to dry clean my cotton clothing I hardly have money to buy more!


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnut_the_Great, you're putting words in my mouth. Your post is assuming that I dry clean all my cotton clothing. I don't. I dry clean my Cordings cotton chinos, as instructed on the label and their website.
Dry cleaning one pair of cotton chinos in a rotation of about 8-9 will hardly break the bank. The beauty of personal choice is that if you don't like a particular feature of Cordings' trousers, you don't have to buy them. Buy some Dickies.
post #144 of 150
I'm a fan of cordings. I've been shopping there for about 25 years and still have many of the pieces I bought early on. Can't help but feel the styling has become increasingly more influenced by mainstream catalogues. There are fewer of the unique items I used to particularly enjoy.
I thought the styling on the email I got from them this morning was particularly curious. The model and jacket look wildly out of proportion: tiny head, huge hands, super long jacket.
post #145 of 150
I've had a few of the Cordings suits from their promotions (nothing in the last 5 years, but several earlier) and, with a bit of alteration, they were good everyday workhorses.

Experience on other items has been mixed. They have some great twill trousers and nice moleskins. Interestingly I think they must use the same manufacturer for both of these items as Orvis, as both have the same (quite distinctive) pocket lining fabric but Orvis comes out a bit cheaper.m also like their winter knitwear - I have a green jumper I have been using for 15 years, with no holes!

Tweeds, however, are so so and costly for off the peg.
post #146 of 150
How are their shirts, especially "country shirts" other than very full cut?
They certainly aren't very expensive.
post #147 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebop d View Post

I'm a fan of cordings. I've been shopping there for about 25 years and still have many of the pieces I bought early on. Can't help but feel the styling has become increasingly more influenced by mainstream catalogues. There are fewer of the unique items I used to particularly enjoy.
I thought the styling on the email I got from them this morning was particularly curious. The model and jacket look wildly out of proportion: tiny head, huge hands, super long jacket.

Perhaps his head was photoshopped?

 

The jacket length looks acceptable to me.

 

I too have been a long-term fan of Cordings - very long-term in fact. However, I feel they may have been going downhill in recent years. Their suits are nothing special now.

post #148 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

How are their shirts, especially "country shirts" other than very full cut?
They certainly aren't very expensive.

 

They are good quality, but as you say, very full cut. The bodies are very long, the collars are large, but the sleeves are rather short - not quite in normal body proportion.

post #149 of 150

Responding to Post #146, this is true, but if like me, you have a 17.5 inch neck and a 33 sleeve, they fit well off the rack, with no alterations, other than an adjustment of the cuff button.

post #150 of 150
did they change the fit on their trousers? I saw the sizing guide and for a 28" waist the leg opening is 9 inches? Seems way too big.
Edited by Slh - 7/18/16 at 10:07am
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