or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › What I've Learned in Business So Far...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What I've Learned in Business So Far... - Page 15

post #211 of 310
I think this is a bit obvious, but I almost learned the hard way, work to avoid making enemies. I work in a small, competitive niche, and in Canada in particular, the financial industry is small, and I am coming to the realization that everyone knows everyone, especially in my space. I made the mistake of sending an email shitting all over a former coworker to another former coworker, and unbelievably, the person I was shitting on read the email over the other person's shoulder at an industry function we were at. I was lucky in that the shittee has effectively ruined her own name, so I won't really get hurt by it, but it could have been worse. I now make an effort to cultivate a positive image and avoid talking about other firms or individuals in a negative light.
post #212 of 310
I posted this in another thread, but think it has a place here too: I read once a very true statement about management: 20% of the people do 80% of the work. Good management means finding the right thing for the other 80% to do so they will be successful, and they will stay out of the way of the other 20%.
post #213 of 310
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post
I posted this in another thread, but think it has a place here too:

I read once a very true statement about management:

20% of the people do 80% of the work. Good management means finding the right thing for the other 80% to do so they will be successful, and they will stay out of the way of the other 20%.

I don't know Ron. In my business, we all work hard but management tends to have good leadership skills. In consulting the managers work pretty hard and are also responsible for getting work done. It's just that they have more administrative duties and have to sit on more calls so the tactical work gets done nights and weekends.
post #214 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
I don't know Ron. In my business, we all work hard but management tends to have good leadership skills. In consulting the managers work pretty hard and are also responsible for getting work done. It's just that they have more administrative duties and have to sit on more calls so the tactical work gets done nights and weekends.
You missed Douglas and my debate on this in the reality show thread (it was a cross-post). I backed down quite a bit. I am in consulting and I certainly have teams that fire on more than 20% of cylinders.. but that's not true in most industries. Turns out that skew of the pareto principle was adopted by the moron who wrote "The 4 hour work week" The concept is somewhat valid. You need to identify your go-to people, and you need to make sure the tasks you are giving your "needy" workers are simpler and better defined so you don't get bogged down answering questions and doing QA on basic work.
post #215 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Some great books in business: Blue Ocean Strategy - Great way of thinking about business growth.
Ok done with this. Maybe it's just not especially applicable to my life, few people go to their PR firm for product development ideas, but even then, it didn't particularly win me over. It felt very much like the authors were superimposing some theory on any business that they could, and even then, with "180 companies over 150 years" (or was it the other way around) they seemingly could only think of like a half dozen successful examples. It seemed like its wisdom boiled down to "do something the other guy isn't"...and since that doesn't justify a whole book, they made up a few charts and spent a while explaining them (in the context of the half dozen businesses that they were retroactively able to superimpose their theories on). Maybe my other bias comes from within. I guess in some ways I have intuitively been doing this for years. Hell, I founded the first international PR firm in a developing country - just tweaked a long established model in various "red oceans" and brought it to Vietnam's 2000+ kilometers of Blue Ocean coastline. I then turned around a bunch of years later and did it all over, so maybe the pearls of wisdom in this book were lost on me simply because I have been "doing something the other guy isn't" for like 7 years....
Quote:
Made To Stick - Best book on business communication ever.
Yup. This is good. About half way through now.
post #216 of 310
Thread Starter 
I really like Blue Ocean Strategy but it is more a strategy and product development perspective than may be useful to you. It's far more specific than do something the other guy isn't. I forgot you were in Vietnam. I have a good friend from work vacationing over there but I'm not sure on his itinerary.
post #217 of 310
Thread Starter 
Matt, Now read the Made to Stick authors Chip and Dan Heath's Switch book on changing corporate culture. This is also very good.
post #218 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Matt,

Now read the Made to Stick authors Chip and Dan Heath's Switch book on changing corporate culture. This is also very good.

any good books on networking?
post #219 of 310
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yjeezle View Post
any good books on networking?

http://www.amazon.com/Heart-Networki...2294940&sr=1-1
post #220 of 310
Thread Starter 
http://www.amazon.com/Never-Eat-Alon...2294975&sr=1-1 Starting on this one for overall business advice: http://www.amazon.com/Enchantment-Ch...2295009&sr=1-1
post #221 of 310
Thread Starter 
Don't agree 100% but there is wisdom in this column by Scott Adams: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...editorsPicks_2
post #222 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post
You missed Douglas and my debate on this in the reality show thread (it was a cross-post). I backed down quite a bit. I am in consulting and I certainly have teams that fire on more than 20% of cylinders.. but that's not true in most industries.

Turns out that skew of the pareto principle was adopted by the moron who wrote "The 4 hour work week"

The concept is somewhat valid. You need to identify your go-to people, and you need to make sure the tasks you are giving your "needy" workers are simpler and better defined so you don't get bogged down answering questions and doing QA on basic work.

I think industries like consulting where most employees are high achievers is different in this respect than many other industries/business functions. In consulting everyone is expected to sacrifice for work and deliver at a high level. I think it comes with the territory. In many different industries and functions you have to balance the needs of a larger and more varied group of employees. Some will be ambitious and results oriented and some are there just to pay the bills. I think both workers can actually be beneficial to a business, you just need to know how to maximize their usefulness.

So I agree that the 20/80 dynamic exists, but I think it's more prevalent in industry than it is in consulting or banking, for instance.
post #223 of 310
Great thread; very informative. I am currently a freshman liberal arts major at a top LAC, and I'm looking for advice as to what supplementary courses I should take to bolster my attractiveness to consulting firms. I've already taken intro econ, and intend on taking both intermediate micro and macro next year, as well as Calc II. Will I need to take courses like econ stats and econometrics? Accounting? Corp fin? Just want to make sure I'm up to snuff on the numbers side of things.
post #224 of 310
Depending on the type of consulting, advanced statistics are always good. Also Organizational Psychology.
post #225 of 310
Thread Starter 
This is a good article on interviewing: http://www.fins.com/Finance/Articles...-Job-Interview
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › What I've Learned in Business So Far...