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Are all Allen Edmonds Uppers Made in the Dominican Republic? - Page 4

post #46 of 53
well its good to know and to me doesn't cause me not to want to buy AE products. A little disappointing that its not a 100% american made product, but I understand the need to maintain a pricepoint and value proposition.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

History buffs might see this as our micro version of the Monroe Doctrine...

Sir, history buffs might also note that the Monroe Doctrine isn't very well regarded by America's southern neighbors, especially after the Roosevelt Corollary to it was added.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

... or maybe a localized DR Marshall Plan.

Perhaps a less contentious example. Though I suspect US workers nowadays aren't too concerned about providing Marshall Plan-like assistance to anyone.

Me, I'm all for FDI, especially close to home rather than in China or India.

But if you're going to wrap yourself in the flag and claim 100% American made, you may want to think of your customers' reactions when they learn it isn't - setting aside legalistic definitions of what does and doesn't qualify as made in America.

I think a better spin is to cite a partnership where more American jobs are able to be created due to the skills of DR workers.
post #48 of 53

well, McDonalds is selling 100% beef so of course AE can claim its Made in USA.

post #49 of 53
Curzon -- You're more knowledgeable than I am. I just think of the Monroe Doctrine as a commitment by the US to the security of our hemisphere, and to prohibiting interference from eastern hemisphere powers. I wasn't thinking of the Roosevelt Corollary at all in the analogy. Your partnership description is better. They help us sell more shoes and grow our U.S. employment and we help them make livings and grow employment there.

Thanks for the insights.

Best wishes,
Paul
post #50 of 53
Comes from having lived abroad for over 2 decades, I reckon. Gives one some perspective on how others view us.

You just keep on making great shoes... and push those exports. Need someone to do something to whittle away at the trade imbalance and grow good jobs in the midwest - summered in Door County for years as a kid, and drank a lot of Point beer as a teen, so I have an affinity for Wisconsin.

Best regards.
post #51 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

Gentlemen -
Thanks for your feedback. We do indeed have duplicative capabilities at the beginning of the shoemaking process in Wisconsin and, since 2006, in the Dominican Republic. Both plants are 100% owned and managed closely by us, staffed by our employees. If you watch our YouTube Plant Tour video (available on our website home page), the part of the Goodyear welt process that's also done in the DR is the cutting of the upper leathers, sewing of those pieces together and "hanging" of the lining. The resulting work-in-process looks like a flattened baseball cap with a large hole in the top and no sewn seams around the brim or the bottom of the cap.
The lining and the unfinished upper are attached together and to the bottom of the shoe in the lasting and welting processes, which are all done in Wisconsin. The footbed (inside bottom) leather cutting and the welt taping for the sides and bottoms of the shoes are done 100% in Port Washington, as is the rest of the production process -- the shaping of the loose uppers in preparation for lasting, insertion of toeboxes and heel counters, lasting, attaching the footbed, welting, hot corking, sewing on the sole, nailing and gluing on the heel base, attaching the heel "toplift", trimming all the edges, wheeling, cutting, trimming and attaching the sock liner (when used), and all the stages of finishing. How the duplicated work on the uppers gets distributed between the two plants depends on order flows from week to week.
The increase in demand for our shoes has led us to hire more people in both plants on all functions, which is good for both local economies. We're proud to be building economic vitality in two places that need it in the Western Hemisphere, one right here in Wisconsin and one a few hundred miles off the shore of Florida. History buffs might see this as our micro version of the Monroe Doctrine or maybe a localized DR Marshall Plan.
This formula works for us and for our U.S. employment growth, which is where the majority of our new hires are. Keeping our prices lower than any other fully Goodyear welted shoe manufacturer is an important part of our AE value proposition. It also allows us to spread workload effectively between the two locations so that we keep our delivery times as short as possible, a couple of days in many instances. Delivery to major wholesale accounts with that kind of flexibility is a major competitive advantage versus the Asian shoe importers who send shoes by ocean vessel in containerloads. Keeping our prices under control keeps us accessible for more and more customers with family budgets.
Thanks for the question and the interest. I hope the hundreds (and growing) of people we have in our Port Washington facitilities will continue to have your support.
Best wishes,
Paul

Is the Independence collection and webgems 100% USA made. I asked this at a B&M store today and was told they were.
post #52 of 53
So which AE models, if any, are 100% made in the USA?
post #53 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmarsh1976 View Post

So which AE models, if any, are 100% made in the USA?

Sorry to bump an old thread, but I think it was supposed to eventually go back to being made in the USA.
Are they still importing the uppers?
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