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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 665

post #9961 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL3212 View Post

Hello all,

I just purchased these Wolverine 1000 mile boots and when they arrived the stitching on the upper was already coming off. Is this an easy fix? The retailer is offering a discount and I'd rather keep them if it's not that big of an issue. I have not contacted Wolverine yet.  Thanks for any help!

I suspect it's not even an essential or critical line of stitching...I'd need to see the inside of the boot.

Beyond that, a competent shoe repair could stitch it up for a couple of bucks.
post #9962 of 19272

I've just bought a new pair of burgundy cordovan semi-brouges. I know that you usually don't treat cordovan with anything when new, although, these are actually feeling a little dry. What should I use to nourish the cordovan? I have Saphir Renovateur, burgundy and neutral cordovan cream.

post #9963 of 19272
Cordovan cream is fine
post #9964 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacafotos View Post

Question re shoe repair:

My Alden eyelets are sharp and snag the laces. I've filed them down, but some remain problematic.

Is there a compound I can coat the inside diameter with, something clear that would harden and cover the sharp metal?

I'm thinking a clear coat like that use for nails. Not sure if that would work.

Nine times out of ten, when an eyelet "snags" the laces it is because the eyelet itself is damaged.

Eyelets are usually pretty thin metal...sometimes nickle or brass but more often, esp. in the case of "dress" shoe eyelets, aluminum. And most of them are baked enameled or painted to begin with. Adding more paint won't help much....the damage is done, the metal worn through.

Take them to a competent repair shop and have the eyelets replaced.

--
Edited by DWFII - 6/30/14 at 9:31am
post #9965 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL3212 View Post
 

Hello all,

 

I just purchased these Wolverine 1000 mile boots and when they arrived the stitching on the upper was already coming off. Is this an easy fix? The retailer is offering a discount and I'd rather keep them if it's not that big of an issue. I have not contacted Wolverine yet.  Thanks for any help!

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I suspect it's not even an essential or critical line of stitching...I'd need to see the inside of the boot.

Beyond that, a competent shoe repair could stitch it up for a couple of bucks.

 

Here is a few shots of the inside and another of the outside. Thanks so much for the advice! I really appreciate it.


 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

post #9966 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL3212 View Post



Here is a few shots of the inside and another of the outside. Thanks so much for the advice! I really appreciate it.
 



Ornamental only.
post #9967 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Cordovan cream is fine

 

Should I use the burgundy colored or the neutral cream? As I said: the shoes are new, if that matters.

post #9968 of 19272
Whatever your gut tells you
post #9969 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Replacing a steel shank in a shoe that came with steel shanks is a fairly straightforward job--if at least one is intact, you have a template. But it is a measure of incomprehension and inadequate understanding, regarding the fundamentals of how shoes are made, to rationalize or try to justify putting steel shanks into shoes that have never had them when the original last is not present or available. Period.

Anyone wanting to understand how shoes are made first has to understand the last--to have studied lasts. Even better to have made shoes on lasts and seen and considered the results and implications.

From the featherline at the heel seat to the treadline in the forepart, the last is radiused...lengthwise and widthwise. Lengthwise, it starts with a "convex" curve in the heelseat, transitions to a "concave" curve in the waist and transitions back to a convex curve as it approaches the treadline. So it's a compound ...and complex...curve. And all of these segments are "fair curves," meaning that they have a functional (even mathematical) as well as aesthetic principle that they adhere to.

It would be rare to find any two lasts models, even at the same heel height, having identical curves in identical proportions.

When a shoe is made, esp. if it is a decent shoe with a leather insole, the insole is shaped to conform very closely to the bottom of the last. If a steel shank is to be used, the shoe manufacturer will commission steel shanks especially bent to conform to the last being used. Some shanks will fit size five lasts, others will fit size 13 lasts--they won't be identical.

And, for each heel height a different configuration must be created.

The shank is sandwiched in-between the insole and the outsole such that if no shank covering is used or no "cottage" built, there will be no gap between the insole and the shank or the shank and the outsole.

Done correctly, the shank supports the shoe at the correct heel height and supports the waist of the shoe exactly as the designer of the last intended--no sags, no bags, no gaps.

And it will continue to support the shoe in that same manner and shape for the life of the shoe (or until the shank rusts and/or is broken) and provide the wearer with exactly the same support and feel that he purchased.

With bespoke shoes, the shank is purposefully and carefully bent to conform to the bottom of the insole. And all of the previous principles apply.

And then the heel is added (or built) and leveled so that the heel sits properly.

But all of this is predicated on the last being present in the shoe. Without the last, the insole cannot be formed to the bottom of the last--it will tend to be flat and to "bridge" gaps and curves. Without the last, the shank cannot accurately be bent to conform to the bottom of the last.

And it is worth noting that heel height and proper heel "set" are entirely and critically dependent on the last and the bottom curves. Without the last, the heel cannot be set properly.

Trying to fit metal shanks into a shoe that has only had fiber or leather shanks...without the original last...is a guessing game at best...and a "good-enough-for-government-work" job, all the time.

Any attempt to bend the shank to support a shoe in the absence of the original last is a fool's game--it has no foundation in either logic or best practices.

Since last bottoms are different, shanks that come from wholesale outlets cannot be trusted to conform to any given last. You might as well stick an unbent 30 penny nail in there and call it good.

Yes, metal shanks can be mounted in shoes that never had metal shanks...anything can be done but the real question is "should it be done?"

Or maybe even "is it ethical to do it?"

--

No need to read all of this. Been doing it for ever. Never a problem, no complaints.
post #9970 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baked Potato View Post
 

 

Should I use the burgundy colored or the neutral cream? As I said: the shoes are new, if that matters.

burgundy colored would be better!! neutral cream tends to create a "dusty" effect where the shoes creases( neutral wax  cracks-chip off and with the absence of pigment looks like dust especially in dark colored shoes!)

post #9971 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

burgundy colored would be better!! neutral cream tends to create a "dusty" effect where the shoes creases( neutral wax  cracks-chip off and with the absence of pigment looks like dust especially in dark colored shoes!)

or you can mix some burgundy or any cream with neutral cordovan, that way you dont have to end up buying one each for calf and cordovan.
post #9972 of 19272

The hispanic lady at B Nelsons that always shines my shoes says to use neutral on new shoes...

 

Don't really know why...but she does give a damn good shoe shine

post #9973 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post


or you can mix some burgundy or any cream with neutral cordovan, that way you dont have to end up buying one each for calf and cordovan.

i dont think thats quite good idea cause this way you add solvents(turpentine-naphtha etc ) in cordovan cream where they are not indented to be! + this wont save you from the Dusty effect(i have tried that with no success)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

The hispanic lady at B Nelsons that always shines my shoes says to use neutral on new shoes...

 

Don't really know why...but she does give a damn good shoe shine

Generally there is no difference in consistency of a pigmented and neutral cream of the same brand and brand line! the only thing i can think is that she use neutral so not to alter the color of the new pair !!

post #9974 of 19272
When I was a young man just getting into the Trade, I struggled with fit...I think every maker does. Yet most of my contemporaries in the bootmaking business, and esp. some of the older guys, were insistent that they had never had a misfit. Never had a complaint. Never. Ever.

Even in the beginning I knew that wasn't true. Not just from my own struggles but from talking to customers who were on the "rebound" from some of these makers, and who not only had fit problems but had indeed complained to the maker (who apparently just didn't want to hear it).

For some years I couldn't understand that kind of mentality. It seemed dishonest to me.

Then one evening I was talking to one of the legends of the Trade over a brew or two and I mentioned this...and expressed my contempt for people who would lie about something so fundamental.

The "legend" said something that has stuck with me over the years...he said "Everyone has misfits. It's part of the learning process and if you don't have misfits you don't learn anything and you cannot grow or get better. But," he want on, "those old boys aren't lying, they just need a better definition of fit." Without a definition that answers to the laws of physics and to reality and the possibility that the fit isn't ideal, anything goes. Any fit is OK...even if it isn't.

I still don't believe it's ethical to so cavalierly dismiss knowledge as well as the concerns of customers who trust you to know and do right by them. But as I said--just about anything is possible but that doesn't make it right.
post #9975 of 19272
A selection from the Carreducker blog (the article just below mine) that seems appropriate:
Quote:

"Being modern shoemakers, we are always keen to examine our practice and explore new ways of working. My feeling is that most of what we are taught as apprentices is the accumulation of generations of shoemaking knowledge and that most things have been tried. This means that what we are taught by our masters is probably the best way of doing something and we change it at our peril with what seems (at the time) a great new way to do something but which, over time, you come to realise that maybe they were right all along.

An area we are currently re-examining is shanks. We were taught as apprentices in a world famous bespoke shomakers in London, that leather shanks are all you need for a gent's shoe. This is generally true with a few provisos - that the shank is thick, that the heel is below an inch and an eighth and that the customer is of average weight.

So we have always used leather shanks. But there are problems - you have to shape the shank to get a nice contour in the waist and the tendency is to make it too thin. And we have had a few pairs back for repairs which have a bit of collapsed shank.

This has led us to fitting metal shanks as standard now in men's shoes much as we would for women's shoes.

And this is how I was taught to do it. It is essential that the shank is secure and won't shift around when the shoe is worn.

Once you have welted the shoe and you are ready to put the shank in, you have to shape it to the curve of the last. So place it and give it a few enormous hits with the hammer. This should give it the right curve. If you can remember, it is a good idea to do this on the last before you even attach the insole."
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