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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 663

post #9931 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

I see no pic. Please try again as I'd like to see it.

Sorry about that. I guess I don't know to post a pic! I have it in my mail box.
Any suggestions would be helpful. In the meantime I'll try and figure it out.

Save the image from your email on your computer. Edit your post and click the icon that looks like mountains and a sun; this is for images. Click on the 'Upload Files' option in the top o the popup. You can select multiple images by holding ctrl while you select them. Browse to the image you saved from your email.
post #9932 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

Save the image from your email on your computer. Edit your post and click the icon that looks like mountains and a sun; this is for images. Click on the 'Upload Files' option in the top o the popup. You can select multiple images by holding ctrl while you select them. Browse to the image you saved from your email.

Thank you Sir. It's been edited.
While I'll be the first to openly admit...I am not an eloquent writer, my spelling is for shit and, I am basically a computer dummy. In fact, I had trouble following your steps. I had to get my Son to do this for me!! But, I do know the shoe repair business inside and out. Now that I am up to speed with this old phe-nom of posting pics I'm happy to contribute more when I can.

Thanks again.
post #9933 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post


Here is a pic of an AE shoe we just opened:

20140627_124515.jpg
4,962 KB

You can see the "member" we discussed earlier.
I prefer to refer to it as a shank because a shank is basically any support in this area made of various materials.

Cool.

Nick, could you put in a fiber or steel "normal" shank when you do a recraft of an AE shoe? That may be an option for me when I need some of my AE shoes resoled. I have some shoes with shanks and I can definitely feel more support. Thanks.
post #9934 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiny View Post

Cool.

Nick, could you put in a fiber or steel "normal" shank when you do a recraft of an AE shoe? That may be an option for me when I need some of my AE shoes resoled. I have some shoes with shanks and I can definitely feel more support. Thanks.

When we take a shoe apart and find a bad or week shank we discard the bad one and pair the good one up with a matching one. If there is no match we replace both. The good one gets saved in inventory to be used as a match later. It's not like a bad tire. If the shank is good, it's good.

Yes...A competent cobbler should be able to install a more rigid or steel shank (upon your request) without disrupting the intended balance of the shoe.
post #9935 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Times change and so does the language but my impression is that "heel tucks" are used inside the shoe...under the heel pad. You are correct that they are used to secure the heel stack but they don't usually function as a shank. The ones I'm familiar with aren't stiff enough or long enough. But they could be the source of discomfort. (No, I take that back...I seem to remember seeing shoes, loafers in particular, that had an insole comprised of a fiber heel and shank area and a paperboard forepart.)

That said, women's fashion shoes use something similar between the outsole/ heel block and the insole which does function as a shank of sorts. (Women's fashion shoes are not my area of expertise...I've repaired them but I have zero interest in them.) so it wouldn surprise me if the same material or something similar was being used in the manufacture of low heeled men's shoes.

The reason the "heel tucks" I'm familiar with are used is that on this quality of shoe, fiberboard insoles are the rule rather than the exception. And fiberboard or leatherboard insoles are not stout or dense enough to hold the nails. Since the nails are driven into the heel stack...which itself is usually made of fiberboard...from the interior of the shoe, the heads of the nails would, given the stresses that the heels are subject to, pull right through the insole without the tuck.

--

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Unless I misunderstood you...it sounds like what is known as Blake-Rapid. If good materials are used ...esp. for the insole...it is a very good method of making a shoe. Much better than GY and almost as good as HW.
Even pretty good shoemakers can learn from reading his blog regularly. And often the "comments" are interesting, too.

That said, it's not a Twitter feed so if a person is made uncomfortable by length or literacy, be forewarned (just a general observation, not aimed at you). but then, I read Grammarphobia

--

 

Thanks for your thoughts as always, DW.  You are quite correct in the changing terminology.  What Nick posted in his photo is exactly what we are referring to, and while the source I read indicated that it was for nails to grip into, the picture doesn't seem to show that.  It looks like there may be some nail holes in the right side (top) of the tuck, but I don't see any others.  There does appear to be some flexing in the small nub that sticks out in the front, which looks like it would be right around the heel breast.  However, he said that his discomfort was on the inside rather than on the outside edge of the heel breast.  Interesting. 

 

I think the explanation of the intended purpose of this fiber piece still makes some sense, knowing how AE constructs their shoes.  Their "standard" line is made with a rather thick (for GY-welting of course) leather insole.  It's about the thickness of a decent leather belt (about 1/8" thick) which is on the heavy side of the spectrum, by comparison, for GY-welted shoes made with leather insoles.  There seems to be a fair split between GY-manufacturers who drive their nails down from the top and cover the nail heads with the thin sock liner and manufacturers who drive them from the bottom up for securing the heel stack.  Of course there are also the small clinch nails used to secure the heel seat prior to affixing the heel stack (which is pre-assembled by most GY manufacturers and you know).  AE doesn't use a sock liner because no nails are in contact (theoretically) with the insole.  The foot just rests from heel to toe on the smooth leather insole, with no additional cushion from a sock liner.  They lay in the cork before they lay in the fiber piece, and my assumption (which can get a person in trouble) had been that they simply know the exact length of nails they need to drive through the heel base, outsole, and fiber tuck so that any nail point protruding through it would be absorbed by the cork and leather insole and never be noticed by the wearer's heel.  I would assume by the time it reached the insole, there would be so little point left that it would only make a small dimple at best.  As Nick pointed out, they make shoes by the hundreds (or even thousands) daily, so they obviously have it down to a science, and I'm sure they could easily figure out how long the nails have to be to accomplish their goal. 

 

I say all this, not because I think you will necessarily care, but because shoe manufacturing techniques are extremely interesting to me. :D     That's why I go to thrift shops and snap up pairs for dissection when possible (I don't wear used shoes).  I have a pair of AE's waiting for dissection, so I'll be happy to post my findings for anyone who cares once I get around to them.

 

On a separate note, with your second post I quoted, I fully see the logic with why Blake-rapid is sturdier than GY-welting.  My only bone to pick with it is availability.  The prices I run into with quality Blake-rapid shoes (leather insole and good finishing) is that it is just as cost effective to buy a hand-welted shoe.  When that's the case, it's a no-brainer to me.  I would always pick a hand-welted shoe over a Blake-rapid, unless I was just smitten by the Blake-rapid shoe for some reason.  The lower cost Blake-rapid shoes that I find use fiberboard or Texon insoles.  As always, I'd welcome any direction someone could point me in towards quality Blake-rapid shoes that that don't price themselves in the range of a hand-welted shoe.   

post #9936 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Apropos of nothing in particular and maybe even a bit OT...James Ducker and Debora Carre (I hope I got that right) invited me to do a guest blog some time ago. How generous is that?!

Today was the day and the blog can be found here.

The Carreducker blog is one of the best on the Internet, in my opinion. The work they do is exceptional and, even more importantly, they spend enormous amounts of time and energy sharing insights and skills, and educating the public about fundamental shoemaking issues and techniques. "A work of love and respect." I can't recommend it highly enough esp. for people wanting to learn about shoes and how they are made...when made correctly.

--

 

Thanks for posting DW.  I thoroughly enjoy this blog as well. 

post #9937 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post


Here is a pic of an AE shoe we just opened:

20140627_124515.jpg
4,962 KB

You can see the "member" we discussed earlier.
I prefer to refer to it as a shank because a shank is basically any support in this area made of various materials.

 

Thanks very much for taking the time to post that picture Nick!  It does seem to show some bending right at the point where it tapers down to the point that is extending forward from the heel.  It looks like there are some small nail holes in the right side of the piece (top of the photo), but nowhere else that I can see.  If it's only purpose is to provide a gripping medium for nails, it is interesting that it would have the tapered point in the front, which seems like it would be useless.  Was it broken or splitting there, near the zone that gsgleason was saying he is having his discomfort?

post #9938 of 19050

In a couple of weeks time, I am going to Singapore for five days. I am only taking hand luggage and won't have room for a second pair of shoes. Does anyone have any advice about how best to condition my shoes, before 14 hour X 2 flights and five days of wearing the same shoes? Should I take a brush with me or will a cloth suffice?  Does a pressurised cabin affect leather in any way?

post #9939 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

Thanks very much for taking the time to post that picture Nick!  It does seem to show some bending right at the point where it tapers down to the point that is extending forward from the heel.  It looks like there are some small nail holes in the right side of the piece (top of the photo), but nowhere else that I can see.  If it's only purpose is to provide a gripping medium for nails, it is interesting that it would have the tapered point in the front, which seems like it would be useless.  Was it broken or splitting there, near the zone that gsgleason was saying he is having his discomfort?

Yes there was a crease in the area that would be above the heel breast. Both shanks will be replaced with steel out of our inventory.
To dispel some previous false claims of my "vested interests". This is a perfect example. My true vested interests lie in what is doing best for the customer. We see this all of the time and just replace them w/o telling or charging the customer. My philosophy is a simple basic one....
Take care of the customer and everything else will take care of itself. I will point out though if there is more extensive damage we will stop the job an discuss it with the customer. At that point it's up to him to decide if the wants to continue with the re-craft.

I also would like to point something else out. In this case it is a 360 degree welt. Most 360's are double soled which means 3 layers are cemented and stitched around the entire circumference of the shoe. That in itself gives more support including in the shank area. In this case the shank still failed. With a 270 welt (usually single soled) the stitching stops just beyond the outside edges where the heel breast is. Those cases are more common for failed shanks.
post #9940 of 19050
I've been very busy lately and unable to look at Style Forum. Has there been a consensus that topy's are ugly yet? devil.gif
post #9941 of 19050

Just to get you up to date, pB, some are in favour of topy's and some aren't. 

post #9942 of 19050
Still!!??! You're supposed to have my back Munky!!! smile.gif
post #9943 of 19050

I do what I can, in difficult times. :embar: 

post #9944 of 19050
S&P is at 1,960! These times are wonderful! But we are due for a good crash, aren't we?
post #9945 of 19050

Munky, there's always room for one pair of shoes in your hand luggage.  Just wear the heavier pair.  And I'd just dust them off with the shoe bag or a cloth, or the little silicon sponge you will probably find in your hotel room.  Or take a pair of your wife's old nylon tights.  A possible embarrassment if your bag is searched, but then again a very good story.

 

Also, if you're on a fourteen hour flight, why not just take your shoes off and put them in the overhead locker?  I always do for anything over a couple of hours.  Much more comfortable.

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